Posts tagged water
11:31 am - Wed, Oct 17, 2012
42 notes

Studiomobile unveiled a futuristic-looking installation as part of the Venice Architecture Biennale 2012. “Networking Nature” is a living ecosystem that feeds off seawater and turns it into fresh drinking water via solar-powered stills.
The mechanics behind Networking Nature involves placing ocean water in glass tanks. As the tanks heat up by small lamps, this causes the seawater to evaporate, where the steam is then condensed into fresh water. The drinking water is finally collected in tanks, ready to be distributed.
The designers explain that the contraption is created to be part of a larger local water infrastructure called “Smart Water Network.”

(via Living Ecosystem Turns Seawater Into Fresh Drinking Water [Pics] - PSFK)

Studiomobile unveiled a futuristic-looking installation as part of the Venice Architecture Biennale 2012. “Networking Nature” is a living ecosystem that feeds off seawater and turns it into fresh drinking water via solar-powered stills.

The mechanics behind Networking Nature involves placing ocean water in glass tanks. As the tanks heat up by small lamps, this causes the seawater to evaporate, where the steam is then condensed into fresh water. The drinking water is finally collected in tanks, ready to be distributed.

The designers explain that the contraption is created to be part of a larger local water infrastructure called “Smart Water Network.”

8:57 am - Mon, Jul 23, 2012
133 notes
good:

Do It Yourself: Use a Bottle to Reduce the Water Your Toilet Wastes #30DaysofGOOD

A half-gallon container can save you hundreds of gallons of water per year.
Every day, the average person flushes a toilet 4.5 times. For many of those toilets, each twist of the handle dumps four or more gallons of water down the drain. That’s 18 gallons of toilet water per day, per person. That means in a town of just 60,000 inhabitants, a million gallons of toilet water gets carried into sewers and septic tanks each day.

Read more at GOOD.is

good:

Do It Yourself: Use a Bottle to Reduce the Water Your Toilet Wastes #30DaysofGOOD

A half-gallon container can save you hundreds of gallons of water per year.

Every day, the average person flushes a toilet 4.5 times. For many of those toilets, each twist of the handle dumps four or more gallons of water down the drain. That’s 18 gallons of toilet water per day, per person. That means in a town of just 60,000 inhabitants, a million gallons of toilet water gets carried into sewers and septic tanks each day.

Read more at GOOD.is

4:55 pm - Thu, Mar 22, 2012
179 notes
Today, as many of you know, is World Water Day. And we, like many of you, strive to help increase awareness of the ongoing need to protect and conserve water and other natural resources.
Are you aware that:
Reducing your shower time by 5 minutes can save up to 20 gallons of water per shower?
Washing dishes in a dishwasher instead of hand-washing them can save 16 gallons of water? 
A low-flow toilet can save 25 gallons of water/day?
A dripping faucet can result in 20 gallons of lost water per day?
Thanks to our friends at The Nature Conservancy, who created this “Water Footprint of an American” infographic and shared the valuable water-saving tips!
Find much more info on The Nature Conservancy’s blog here. 

Today, as many of you know, is World Water Day. And we, like many of you, strive to help increase awareness of the ongoing need to protect and conserve water and other natural resources.

Are you aware that:

  • Reducing your shower time by 5 minutes can save up to 20 gallons of water per shower?
  • Washing dishes in a dishwasher instead of hand-washing them can save 16 gallons of water? 
  • A low-flow toilet can save 25 gallons of water/day?
  • A dripping faucet can result in 20 gallons of lost water per day?

Thanks to our friends at The Nature Conservancy, who created this “Water Footprint of an American” infographic and shared the valuable water-saving tips!

Find much more info on The Nature Conservancy’s blog here

10:08 am - Fri, Oct 14, 2011
169 notes


One of the most innovative products found on the Greenbuild Expo floor was the Reveeco EcoVéa recycling shower. This might be a hard sell for some but the concept is brilliant, allowing you to enjoy long showers without guilt. Possibly the world’s most intelligent shower, EcoVéa recycles water within your shower to push the limits of water conservation. For a ten minute shower, the EcoVéa can save up to 66% above your fixture efficiency savings.
EcoVéa consists of a 36″ x 36″ shower base which comes in a variety of finishes …. While showering, the EcoVéa cell analyzes whether water is dirty and should be discarded or water is clean and can be reused. If reused, it is treated through a filter and antibacterial treatment, mixed with a small quantity of new hot water to maintain a consistent temperature, and sent back to the shower head.


(via Smart EcoVéa Enables Guilt-Free Showers — Jetson Green)

One of the most innovative products found on the Greenbuild Expo floor was the Reveeco EcoVéa recycling shower. This might be a hard sell for some but the concept is brilliant, allowing you to enjoy long showers without guilt. Possibly the world’s most intelligent shower, EcoVéa recycles water within your shower to push the limits of water conservation. For a ten minute shower, the EcoVéa can save up to 66% above your fixture efficiency savings.

EcoVéa consists of a 36″ x 36″ shower base which comes in a variety of finishes …. While showering, the EcoVéa cell analyzes whether water is dirty and should be discarded or water is clean and can be reused. If reused, it is treated through a filter and antibacterial treatment, mixed with a small quantity of new hot water to maintain a consistent temperature, and sent back to the shower head.

(via Smart EcoVéa Enables Guilt-Free Showers — Jetson Green)

7:17 am - Tue, Oct 4, 2011
105 notes
“What many take for granted,  millions of others have no or limited   access to. The Life Sack is an  innovative idea that could give clean   drinking water to people in  underdeveloped regions of the world.
Life  Sack is an idea for a new water purifier kit by Korean   industrial  designers Jung Uk Park, Myeong Hoon Lee and Dae Youl Lee.
The  Life Sack repurposes grain sacks as water purifier kits.   Contaminated water is filtered using SODIS (Solar Water Disinfection   Process), which  involves a combination of UV-A radiation and thermal   treatment to kill  the harmful micro-organisms and bacteria found in the   water.”
via Design Indaba

“What many take for granted, millions of others have no or limited access to. The Life Sack is an innovative idea that could give clean drinking water to people in underdeveloped regions of the world.

Life Sack is an idea for a new water purifier kit by Korean industrial designers Jung Uk Park, Myeong Hoon Lee and Dae Youl Lee.

The Life Sack repurposes grain sacks as water purifier kits. Contaminated water is filtered using SODIS (Solar Water Disinfection Process), which involves a combination of UV-A radiation and thermal treatment to kill the harmful micro-organisms and bacteria found in the water.”

via Design Indaba

3:51 pm - Fri, Nov 5, 2010
6 notes

Via smarterplanet:

PepsiCo is taking a major lead in sustainability through its ownership of the potato chip company Walkers.  They are developing a process that would capture water released from potatoes. Not only would the excess water be used in the process for peeling and slicing, but it will eventually add to local drinking water supplies.

(via emergentfutures)

11:06 pm - Tue, Jul 27, 2010
6 notes
Infographic du jour 
(click image for larger version)
[via Brian Clark Howard on Huffington Post]

Infographic du jour 

(click image for larger version)

[via Brian Clark Howard on Huffington Post]

11:16 am - Sat, Apr 3, 2010
1 note

The newest from the people that created the popular video “The Story of Stuff”, “The Story of Bottled Water” gives some interesting insight into the debate of Bottled vs. Tap in an 8 minute video.

11:05 am - Thu, Mar 25, 2010
8 notes
Hot on the heels of this bottled water ban, these glass water bottles from LifeFactory provide another option if stainless steel isn’t your cup of tea, and issues with BPA in older reusables leave you seeking an alternative. Fusing modern sensibility, eco-friendly composition, and exceptional utility, these bottles are made from plain-old glass (imagine..!), with a non-toxic silicone sleeve to protect them from breakage and allow for a better grip. 
"The glass make-up of the reusable bottle means what you see is what you get. Glass is a nonporous material containing zero harmful chemicals and does not scratch, significantly reducing bacterial growth. With Lifefactory bottles you will never experience any type of leaching into your liquid nor will you ever be left with a metallic taste. Best of all, glass is a low impact raw material that is readily abundant, easy to process and 100% recyclable, which is minimally taxing on our environment.”
via Treehugger

Hot on the heels of this bottled water ban, these glass water bottles from LifeFactory provide another option if stainless steel isn’t your cup of tea, and issues with BPA in older reusables leave you seeking an alternative. Fusing modern sensibility, eco-friendly composition, and exceptional utility, these bottles are made from plain-old glass (imagine..!), with a non-toxic silicone sleeve to protect them from breakage and allow for a better grip. 

"The glass make-up of the reusable bottle means what you see is what you get. Glass is a nonporous material containing zero harmful chemicals and does not scratch, significantly reducing bacterial growth. With Lifefactory bottles you will never experience any type of leaching into your liquid nor will you ever be left with a metallic taste. Best of all, glass is a low impact raw material that is readily abundant, easy to process and 100% recyclable, which is minimally taxing on our environment.”

via Treehugger

6:59 pm - Mon, Mar 22, 2010
9 notes

University of Portland bans bottled water

The University of Portland has recently banned the sale of bottled water on its campus stating both ethical and environmental reasons for the action. They’ve replaced disposable plastic bottles with multi-use stainless-steel bottles which they hope will encourage a campus-wide use of the local water system.

Speaking on Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Think Out Loud this morning, a UP representative explained:

"We’ve banned the sale of disposable plastic water bottles on campus for several reasons. One reason is that we consider water to be a human right and not a commodity…that water is so important and so crucial that it shouldn’t be allowed to become a commodity that just is bought and sold to the highest bidder. So we wanted to move away from that."

Bottling water also has really significant environmental impacts both locally where you remove the water from but also in terms of the petro-chemicals needed to produce the plastic water bottles, the transportation of the water by truck…there’s a large environmental footprint to doing this. And really the water coming out of the tap, the water coming out of our drinking fountains is tested to a higher quality than bottled water is. We have, here in Portland, some of the best water in the world.”

We sold tens of thousands of bottled water in an academic year. We’re now providing…stainless steel water bottles for not a whole lot more money than a couple of bottles of disposable water in plastic bottles. And so, students are buying stainless steel bottles and filling them up.”

The full interview is available at the OPB website: Water: From the Bottle or the Tap? Think Out Loud - Oregon Public Broadcasting

Similarly today, Boing Boing linked up an interesting video describing the ‘manufactured demand’ of bottled water: The Story of Bottled Water - Boing Boing

Disposable plastic water bottles no longer available for sale at University of Portland

University of Portland makes a statement, halts bottled water sales - Oregonian

3:45 pm - Tue, Jul 28, 2009
4 notes
TapIt has created a service for residents/visitors in NYC to find free locations to refill your water bottle.  Just check out their online service or their iPhone app to find a participating café or partner, and fill ‘er up.  Café owners benefit from increased traffic, and possibly sales of muffins, and the user doesn’t buy a plastic bottle of water.
(thanks, core77!)

TapIt has created a service for residents/visitors in NYC to find free locations to refill your water bottle.  Just check out their online service or their iPhone app to find a participating café or partner, and fill ‘er up.  Café owners benefit from increased traffic, and possibly sales of muffins, and the user doesn’t buy a plastic bottle of water.

(thanks, core77!)

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