Posts tagged traffic signs
1:38 pm - Sun, Feb 19, 2012
71 notes

We’ve come across many things made from road signs, including this fence, but nothing as intricate as artist Greely Myatt’s “Quiltsurround,” a 32-panel public art installation in downtown Memphis.

Using about 700 speed-limit, caution, and stop signs (and even a few Memphis City Beautiful signs), Myatt designed traditional quilt patterns in 4-by-12 foot panels. The panels … hide a chain-link fence and City Hall’s heating and cooling system.
"We didn’t have a very good budget for this, and the idea of recycling is part of quilting, so I had the idea of taking the street signs that the city was going to recycle," Myatt said. "I knew that material would withstand the outdoors."

Art students from the University of Memphis, where Myatt teaches sculpture, helped fabricate the panels.
(Via Quilts Made From Street Signs @Craftzine.com blog. Photos via Jenean Morrison; quotes from Memphis Flyer.)

We’ve come across many things made from road signs, including this fence, but nothing as intricate as artist Greely Myatt’s “Quiltsurround,” a 32-panel public art installation in downtown Memphis.

Using about 700 speed-limit, caution, and stop signs (and even a few Memphis City Beautiful signs), Myatt designed traditional quilt patterns in 4-by-12 foot panels. The panels … hide a chain-link fence and City Hall’s heating and cooling system.

"We didn’t have a very good budget for this, and the idea of recycling is part of quilting, so I had the idea of taking the street signs that the city was going to recycle," Myatt said. "I knew that material would withstand the outdoors."

Art students from the University of Memphis, where Myatt teaches sculpture, helped fabricate the panels.

(Via Quilts Made From Street Signs @Craftzine.com blog. Photos via Jenean Morrison; quotes from Memphis Flyer.)

4:07 pm - Wed, Oct 26, 2011
282 notes

Residents of Asheville, North Carolina’s Burton Street Community — a neighborhood which fell into decline during the past four decades — have been working with the non-profit Asheville Design Center ”to transform discarded objects into art, neglected properties into community spaces, and at-risk youth into creative catalysts for change.”

A major component of their improvement efforts is an interactive learning and teaching space, designed and built by area university students and community members, in the Burton Street Peace Garden.

Materials used include discarded signs (a large Texaco sign, pictured above, serves as a sliding door), old windows, and door and window screens, among other items.

More at polis: Creative Reuse Transforms Asheville Community.

7:50 am - Wed, Oct 12, 2011
30 notes
House numbers made from old street signs.
via Design Milk

House numbers made from old street signs.

via Design Milk

6:28 pm - Thu, Jun 30, 2011
85 notes
A Dumpster converted to a swimming pool; a food court and pocket park — shaded by vinyl repurposed from old billboards, “with puzzle-piece seating made from old fences” — built by University of Texas at Arlington architecture students; an old piano placed on the street for passersby to play; the street giving greater way to pedestrians and bicyclists; a bike rack made from a traffic sign — all were part of a “Build a Better Boulevard" event held recently near downtown Dallas.
The event took place in association with the Dallas Complete Streets project, “intended to shift the city’s emphasis to building streets that are safer, more livable, and welcoming to everyone.”
(via Scenes From a Better Ross Avenue - DallasObserver - Unfair Park blog)
See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts about repurposed Dumpsters, billboards, pianos, and traffic signs.

A Dumpster converted to a swimming pool; a food court and pocket park — shaded by vinyl repurposed from old billboards, “with puzzle-piece seating made from old fences” — built by University of Texas at Arlington architecture students; an old piano placed on the street for passersby to play; the street giving greater way to pedestrians and bicyclists; a bike rack made from a traffic sign — all were part of a “Build a Better Boulevard" event held recently near downtown Dallas.

The event took place in association with the Dallas Complete Streets project, “intended to shift the city’s emphasis to building streets that are safer, more livable, and welcoming to everyone.”

(via Scenes From a Better Ross Avenue - DallasObserver - Unfair Park blog)

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts about repurposed Dumpsters, billboardspianos, and traffic signs.

5:46 pm
13 notes
To add to the Unconsumption gallery of new uses for old road signs is this chair from friend of Unconsumption Will Holman, who says:

I put together this sleek chair out of a recycled road sign and some salvaged pecan wood, materials that were all sourced within a mile of my Alabama home. The signs came from the local county engineer’s yard, where they sat in a stack after twenty-plus years of faithful service on Alabama’s rural roads. Pecan wood is a species of hickory, native to the American south. It is dense, tight-grained, and strong, perfect for furniture construction.
The resulting chairs are low-slung, laid-back loungers; some were left un-cushioned for use on the back deck, and others were upholstered with either smooth or ribbed cushions for use inside.

(Via Will and Startwoodworking.com, which provides a how-to/tutorial. Thx, Will!)

To add to the Unconsumption gallery of new uses for old road signs is this chair from friend of Unconsumption Will Holman, who says:

I put together this sleek chair out of a recycled road sign and some salvaged pecan wood, materials that were all sourced within a mile of my Alabama home. The signs came from the local county engineer’s yard, where they sat in a stack after twenty-plus years of faithful service on Alabama’s rural roads. Pecan wood is a species of hickory, native to the American south. It is dense, tight-grained, and strong, perfect for furniture construction.

The resulting chairs are low-slung, laid-back loungers; some were left un-cushioned for use on the back deck, and others were upholstered with either smooth or ribbed cushions for use inside.

(Via Will and Startwoodworking.com, which provides a how-to/tutorial. Thx, Will!)

3:15 pm - Tue, Apr 26, 2011
33 notes
edgina:

Unusual Street Sign Furniture by Texas based designer Tim Delger
(via Freshome)

For other creative new uses for road signs, check out earlier Unconsumption posts here.

edgina:

Unusual Street Sign Furniture by Texas based designer Tim Delger

(via Freshome)

For other creative new uses for road signs, check out earlier Unconsumption posts here.

(via problemsolver)

8:22 pm - Wed, Apr 20, 2011
42 notes
Another cool new use for old road signs: 
Trent Jansen’s “cycle signs” — reflectors that can be clamped onto wheel spokes or strapped (using pieces of old bike tire inner tubes) to handlebars, seats, or other bike parts.
(via designboom)
See other uses of signs here.

Another cool new use for old road signs: 

Trent Jansen’s “cycle signs” — reflectors that can be clamped onto wheel spokes or strapped (using pieces of old bike tire inner tubes) to handlebars, seats, or other bike parts.

(via designboom)

See other uses of signs here.

8:21 pm
13 notes
After reading our earlier posts showing new uses for road signs, Friend of Unconsumption Kirsten Hively sent us this photo of a bench she and Becky Hutchinson made, while they were in architecture school, from scrap items from Boston’s “Big Dig" highway project.
The slats and metal cross brace were once a detour sign. The bench’s vertical pieces were made from plywood also found at the Big Dig scrap yard. 
Well done! [And thanks, Kirsten!]

After reading our earlier posts showing new uses for road signs, Friend of Unconsumption Kirsten Hively sent us this photo of a bench she and Becky Hutchinson made, while they were in architecture school, from scrap items from Boston’s “Big Dig" highway project.

The slats and metal cross brace were once a detour sign. The bench’s vertical pieces were made from plywood also found at the Big Dig scrap yard.

Well done! [And thanks, Kirsten!]

3:47 pm - Fri, Mar 25, 2011
10 notes
Another great project that includes repurposed traffic signs, among other items, is described in Dwell magazine’s “Signs of the Times” story:
In Berkeley, California, the Dwight Way — a mixed-use urban-infill project designed, built, and developed by Leger Wanaselja Architecture — features “a fence made from street signs, awnings crafted from hatchback windows, traffic-sign siding, and a gate fashioned out of Volvo station wagon doors.” And that’s just on the building’s exterior! Check out Sam Grawe’s full story, including information about the project’s interior, and Dwell’s slideshow. (Photo by Randi Berez)
See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts featuring items made from repurposed road signs (table and chairs; fence) and traffic lights (chair; pendant lights).

Another great project that includes repurposed traffic signs, among other items, is described in Dwell magazine’s “Signs of the Times” story:

In Berkeley, California, the Dwight Way — a mixed-use urban-infill project designed, built, and developed by Leger Wanaselja Architecture — features “a fence made from street signs, awnings crafted from hatchback windows, traffic-sign siding, and a gate fashioned out of Volvo station wagon doors.” And that’s just on the building’s exterior! Check out Sam Grawe’s full story, including information about the project’s interior, and Dwell’s slideshow. (Photo by Randi Berez)

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts featuring items made from repurposed road signs (table and chairs; fence) and traffic lights (chair; pendant lights).

1:36 pm
10 notes
Over on Instructables, designer Will Holman, whose work we’ve featured previously [metal signs and license plates repurposed as bowls (here and here); a table; a lamp], writes about a related initiative: working with a group of YouthBuild students in Greensboro, Alabama, to build a fence out of old road signs.

YouthBuild (http://www.youthbuild.org) is a national program funded by the Department of Labor that provides low-income young people a chance to study for their GED and acquire trade skills, all while earning a small stipend for their labor. This fall, my students and I built a fence adjacent to our campus. It encloses a playground constructed by the Rural Studio (http://www.ruralstudio.org) in 1997 and currently used by a daycare center. The local county and state highway engineering offices donated old road signs, which we then cut, sanded, filed, and drilled to create pickets. Using jigs and a self-organized assembly line, the students manufactured nearly a thousand pickets for roughly 225 linear feet of fencing. 

(via Road Sign Fence)

Over on Instructables, designer Will Holman, whose work we’ve featured previously [metal signs and license plates repurposed as bowls (here and here); a table; a lamp], writes about a related initiative: working with a group of YouthBuild students in Greensboro, Alabama, to build a fence out of old road signs.

YouthBuild (http://www.youthbuild.org) is a national program funded by the Department of Labor that provides low-income young people a chance to study for their GED and acquire trade skills, all while earning a small stipend for their labor. This fall, my students and I built a fence adjacent to our campus. It encloses a playground constructed by the Rural Studio (http://www.ruralstudio.org) in 1997 and currently used by a daycare center. The local county and state highway engineering offices donated old road signs, which we then cut, sanded, filed, and drilled to create pickets. Using jigs and a self-organized assembly line, the students manufactured nearly a thousand pickets for roughly 225 linear feet of fencing. 

(via Road Sign Fence)

1:28 pm - Tue, Jul 6, 2010
11 notes
Walk - Don’t Walk road-tested chair
From Uncommon Goods’s Web site:

There’s nothing pedestrian about this chair. Artisan John Carter combines fine art, interior design and social commentary for a truly one-of-a-kind creation. The New York City “Walk/Don’t Walk” signs actually work - and a remote control is included to turn them on and off. The legs are made from reconfigured, customized steel street sign brackets, with galvanized, heavy duty self-leveling feet.

Related: Unconsumption post about artist Boris Bally’s work made from re-used traffic signs and other “non-precious materials.”

Walk - Don’t Walk road-tested chair

From Uncommon Goods’s Web site:

There’s nothing pedestrian about this chair. Artisan John Carter combines fine art, interior design and social commentary for a truly one-of-a-kind creation. The New York City “Walk/Don’t Walk” signs actually work - and a remote control is included to turn them on and off. The legs are made from reconfigured, customized steel street sign brackets, with galvanized, heavy duty self-leveling feet.

Related: Unconsumption post about artist Boris Bally’s work made from re-used traffic signs and other “non-precious materials.”

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