Posts tagged toronto
9:21 am - Tue, Jul 10, 2012
143 notes
For the 2012 Canada Blooms Garden Festival, Toronto-based landscape design firm b sq. Design Studio turned 105 standard-sized (48” long x 40” wide x 5” tall) pallets into a garden area featuring planter boxes planted with herbs, a water feature, and a 12-foot-tall playhouse with a “roof deck.” 

Recycled wood pallets were chosen as the primary material for this feature garden as they were a commonly available material that everyone recognizes but only as an industrial object. Our challenge was to take this common element and make it into something beautiful and interesting that could be dismantled after the show and then returned into the commercial market once again to function as shipping pallets.

For more new uses for pallets, check out the archive here.

For the 2012 Canada Blooms Garden Festival, Toronto-based landscape design firm b sq. Design Studio turned 105 standard-sized (48” long x 40” wide x 5” tall) pallets into a garden area featuring planter boxes planted with herbs, a water feature, and a 12-foot-tall playhouse with a “roof deck.” 

Recycled wood pallets were chosen as the primary material for this feature garden as they were a commonly available material that everyone recognizes but only as an industrial object. Our challenge was to take this common element and make it into something beautiful and interesting that could be dismantled after the show and then returned into the commercial market once again to function as shipping pallets.

For more new uses for pallets, check out the archive here.

9:41 am - Fri, May 18, 2012
117 notes
Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.
Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 
One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)


Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.

Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 

One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)

Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

9:13 am - Fri, Feb 24, 2012
149 notes
In Toronto, several people who work together in a group known as “The Art of Reuse" open up pop-up thrift shops in different locations every six months or so, selling merchandise — many items one-of-a-kind — they’ve handpicked (or "curated," as they say) from thrift stores around metro Toronto.
The group aims to “re-invent thrift shopping and the connotation it comes with, whether that be negative or positive,” by creating “well-branded, aesthetically pleasing” shopping environments with merchandise priced at $50 or less.
The temporary stores are “meant to cater to both the fashion conscious and the frugal customer alike.”
In The Globe and Mail, Katharine Scarrow reports:

“It’s never been about generating cash quickly, but raising awareness about thrifting and teaching people about sustainability,” says [group member] Courtney [Eastman].
In the six months leading up to [a store opening], the group spends four to five days a week, fanning to three to four shops a day, scouring each one for roughly an hour at a time. That’s roughly 480 hours of picking (and ultimately ditching) piles of clothes and accessories leading up to the main event.

More: In Pictures: Pop-up thrift shop draws a stylish crowd - The Globe and Mail

In Toronto, several people who work together in a group known as “The Art of Reuse" open up pop-up thrift shops in different locations every six months or so, selling merchandise — many items one-of-a-kind — they’ve handpicked (or "curated," as they say) from thrift stores around metro Toronto.

The group aims to “re-invent thrift shopping and the connotation it comes with, whether that be negative or positive,” by creating “well-branded, aesthetically pleasing” shopping environments with merchandise priced at $50 or less.

The temporary stores are “meant to cater to both the fashion conscious and the frugal customer alike.”

In The Globe and Mail, Katharine Scarrow reports:

“It’s never been about generating cash quickly, but raising awareness about thrifting and teaching people about sustainability,” says [group member] Courtney [Eastman].

In the six months leading up to [a store opening], the group spends four to five days a week, fanning to three to four shops a day, scouring each one for roughly an hour at a time. That’s roughly 480 hours of picking (and ultimately ditching) piles of clothes and accessories leading up to the main event.

More: In Pictures: Pop-up thrift shop draws a stylish crowd - The Globe and Mail

3:26 pm - Thu, Aug 25, 2011
41 notes
Upcycled bicycles

Caroline Macfarlane and Vanessa Nicholas, from Toronto’s OCAD University, gave a bright face-lift to an abandoned Raleigh as a work of art, and part of the Good Bike Project. They hope to make it a city-wide phenomenon.

(via guardian.co.uk)

Upcycled bicycles

Caroline Macfarlane and Vanessa Nicholas, from Toronto’s OCAD University, gave a bright face-lift to an abandoned Raleigh as a work of art, and part of the Good Bike Project. They hope to make it a city-wide phenomenon.

(via guardian.co.uk)

2:43 am - Sun, Jun 5, 2011
54 notes
Toronto has an abundance of planter boxes along its streets.  Unfortunately many of them have been neglected and have become makeshift trashcans void of any actual plants.  Fortunately, Toronto is also home to artist Sean Martindale, who had the vision to beautify the sometimes crumbling cement planters.  Having received the Toronto FEAST Project Grant, he recruited 17 other artists, designers, and gardeners to complete his project, “Outside the Planter Boxes.”
Contributor Martin Reis used Legos to cleverly patch some of the planters. Find more photos on his website.
(via Treehugger)

Toronto has an abundance of planter boxes along its streets.  Unfortunately many of them have been neglected and have become makeshift trashcans void of any actual plants.  Fortunately, Toronto is also home to artist Sean Martindale, who had the vision to beautify the sometimes crumbling cement planters.  Having received the Toronto FEAST Project Grant, he recruited 17 other artists, designers, and gardeners to complete his project, “Outside the Planter Boxes.”

Contributor Martin Reis used Legos to cleverly patch some of the planters. Find more photos on his website.

(via Treehugger)

9:35 pm - Tue, Sep 28, 2010
24 notes
A retired shipping container, known now as the Welcome Hut, helps to orient visitors as they enter the grounds of Toronto’s Evergreen Brick Works (EBW), a new 40-acre nature preserve / redevelopment project — billed as “Canada’s first community environmental center.” EBW is a project of Evergreen, a national charity dedicated to bringing nature into public spaces, schools, and homes.
Several components of EBW’s master plan have been completed on the site that was, for more than a century, a brick factory with massive kilns (decommissioned in the 1980s), with adjacent clay/shale quarry in a ravine along the Don River. 
From an August 2010 Toronto Life Magazine story:

In an earlier age, Toronto would have torn down the brick sheds, but we are beginning to see new value in these old places. We don’t just come for the food or the chit-chat with a charming artisanal cheesemaker. We also come for the worn-down bricks and the history immersion. We crave these historic buildings that can root us in our city’s past and tell us where we came from. The fashion for ruins was also hugely popular in 18th-century England. Back then, people were leaving the land to work in factories. Similarly, as our factories close, we’re developing a nostalgic appreciation for manufacturing.

 
EBW’s offerings are slated to include a sustainable garden center, farmers’ market, demonstration gardens and kitchens, conference and event facilities, community bike space, art exhibition areas, and programs for families and kids. 
The Welcome Hut — Dwell.com slideshow here — was designed so that it could be relocated elsewhere on the property, to serve other purposes as needed. 
(spotted on Twitter, via Dwell’s Miyoko Ohtake, @miyokoohtake)

A retired shipping container, known now as the Welcome Hut, helps to orient visitors as they enter the grounds of Toronto’s Evergreen Brick Works (EBW), a new 40-acre nature preserve / redevelopment project — billed as “Canada’s first community environmental center.” EBW is a project of Evergreen, a national charity dedicated to bringing nature into public spaces, schools, and homes.

Several components of EBW’s master plan have been completed on the site that was, for more than a century, a brick factory with massive kilns (decommissioned in the 1980s), with adjacent clay/shale quarry in a ravine along the Don River. 

From an August 2010 Toronto Life Magazine story:

In an earlier age, Toronto would have torn down the brick sheds, but we are beginning to see new value in these old places. We don’t just come for the food or the chit-chat with a charming artisanal cheesemaker. We also come for the worn-down bricks and the history immersion. We crave these historic buildings that can root us in our city’s past and tell us where we came from. The fashion for ruins was also hugely popular in 18th-century England. Back then, people were leaving the land to work in factories. Similarly, as our factories close, we’re developing a nostalgic appreciation for manufacturing.

EBW’s offerings are slated to include a sustainable garden center, farmers’ market, demonstration gardens and kitchens, conference and event facilities, community bike space, art exhibition areas, and programs for families and kids. 

The Welcome Hut — Dwell.com slideshow here — was designed so that it could be relocated elsewhere on the property, to serve other purposes as needed. 

(spotted on Twitter, via Dwell’s Miyoko Ohtake, @miyokoohtake)

3:17 pm - Wed, Sep 1, 2010
1 note

Recycle your unwanted electronics - City of Toronto (on YouTube)

In addition to helping to increase awareness about electronics recycling services, I think this video could motivate many Torontonians to actually take action in disposing of electronic gadgets and devices.

[spotted on Twitter, via @Earth911]

4:32 pm - Mon, Aug 23, 2010
1 note
Via bmdesign:

Sign up for BIXI!!!  http://toronto.bixi.com/index.php/frontend/news

Bike sharing rolls out in Toronto: An estimated 80 docking stations will be installed in the city’s central core in spring 2011.
Noteworthy (and admirable): the promotion of Bixi gift certificates to businesses to purchase for their employees.
(Personal note: As a veteran of several Toronto winters, I’d be inclined to discount  the subscription rate from November-March, the less-desirable  months for cycling!)
Earlier bike-sharing posts can be found here.

Via bmdesign:

Sign up for BIXI!!!  http://toronto.bixi.com/index.php/frontend/news

Bike sharing rolls out in Toronto: An estimated 80 docking stations will be installed in the city’s central core in spring 2011.

Noteworthy (and admirable): the promotion of Bixi gift certificates to businesses to purchase for their employees.

(Personal note: As a veteran of several Toronto winters, I’d be inclined to discount the subscription rate from November-March, the less-desirable months for cycling!)

Earlier bike-sharing posts can be found here.

Install Headline