Posts tagged thrift
9:13 am - Fri, Feb 24, 2012
150 notes
In Toronto, several people who work together in a group known as “The Art of Reuse" open up pop-up thrift shops in different locations every six months or so, selling merchandise — many items one-of-a-kind — they’ve handpicked (or "curated," as they say) from thrift stores around metro Toronto.
The group aims to “re-invent thrift shopping and the connotation it comes with, whether that be negative or positive,” by creating “well-branded, aesthetically pleasing” shopping environments with merchandise priced at $50 or less.
The temporary stores are “meant to cater to both the fashion conscious and the frugal customer alike.”
In The Globe and Mail, Katharine Scarrow reports:

“It’s never been about generating cash quickly, but raising awareness about thrifting and teaching people about sustainability,” says [group member] Courtney [Eastman].
In the six months leading up to [a store opening], the group spends four to five days a week, fanning to three to four shops a day, scouring each one for roughly an hour at a time. That’s roughly 480 hours of picking (and ultimately ditching) piles of clothes and accessories leading up to the main event.

More: In Pictures: Pop-up thrift shop draws a stylish crowd - The Globe and Mail

In Toronto, several people who work together in a group known as “The Art of Reuse" open up pop-up thrift shops in different locations every six months or so, selling merchandise — many items one-of-a-kind — they’ve handpicked (or "curated," as they say) from thrift stores around metro Toronto.

The group aims to “re-invent thrift shopping and the connotation it comes with, whether that be negative or positive,” by creating “well-branded, aesthetically pleasing” shopping environments with merchandise priced at $50 or less.

The temporary stores are “meant to cater to both the fashion conscious and the frugal customer alike.”

In The Globe and Mail, Katharine Scarrow reports:

“It’s never been about generating cash quickly, but raising awareness about thrifting and teaching people about sustainability,” says [group member] Courtney [Eastman].

In the six months leading up to [a store opening], the group spends four to five days a week, fanning to three to four shops a day, scouring each one for roughly an hour at a time. That’s roughly 480 hours of picking (and ultimately ditching) piles of clothes and accessories leading up to the main event.

More: In Pictures: Pop-up thrift shop draws a stylish crowd - The Globe and Mail

1:50 pm - Sun, Dec 4, 2011
232 notes
gq:


A Midafternoon Shoe Story
Or: The Greatest Thrift-Store Find Ever. Via Friend-of-GQ Andrew Romano:

Don’t give up on good shoes. 
While attending a friend’s wedding in the lovely city of York, England, I stumbled upon a pair of bespoke John Lobb shoes in a local thrift shop. They were my size. They were my style. I knew that they were far nicer than any shoes I’d ever owned. Or had been, in their original state. And even though new, bespoke Lobbs sell for $4,300—these are, after all, some of the finest handcrafted foot coverings on earth—they were only $50. Unfortunately, they weren’t really in office-ready condition, but I bought them anyway, hoping I could find a way to restore them.
I did, as you can see from the before and after photographs above. 
Through Styleforum, a shoe aficionado named Nate offered to work on the uppers, and, being a rookie in these matters (and wanting to learn from a master), I took him up on it. His process consisted of a) buffing with the inside of a sock, which removed “virtually all of the buildup on the surface”; b) applying a layer of Crema Alpina “to clean up anything [he] missed,” at which point they looked “100% better,” with “almost all the creasing… flattened out”; c) giving them a go with Saphir Renovateur to “cut through some of the stubborn old polish”; and d) applying a little Saphir Medaille d’Or brown wax to the microcreases to further try to dissolve any remaining black gunk.
He did a remarkable job. As you can see, the Lobbs do indeed look 100% better, or more. The leather is remarkably resilient; in most places, it could pass as brand-new. There’s still some slight creasing near the front of the shoes, and the black polish that was ground into those creases hasn’t completely vanished. But these are much, much better than presentable, which was my original goal. I think they look fantastic.
Next time I plan to do the job myself. All it took was some quality products, a little know-how, and a lot of elbow grease.  As I said: don’t give up on good shoes. 

gq:

A Midafternoon Shoe Story

Or: The Greatest Thrift-Store Find Ever. Via Friend-of-GQ Andrew Romano:

Don’t give up on good shoes. 

While attending a friend’s wedding in the lovely city of York, England, I stumbled upon a pair of bespoke John Lobb shoes in a local thrift shop. They were my size. They were my style. I knew that they were far nicer than any shoes I’d ever owned. Or had been, in their original state. And even though new, bespoke Lobbs sell for $4,300—these are, after all, some of the finest handcrafted foot coverings on earth—they were only $50. Unfortunately, they weren’t really in office-ready condition, but I bought them anyway, hoping I could find a way to restore them.

I did, as you can see from the before and after photographs above. 

Through Styleforum, a shoe aficionado named Nate offered to work on the uppers, and, being a rookie in these matters (and wanting to learn from a master), I took him up on it. His process consisted of a) buffing with the inside of a sock, which removed “virtually all of the buildup on the surface”; b) applying a layer of Crema Alpina “to clean up anything [he] missed,” at which point they looked “100% better,” with “almost all the creasing… flattened out”; c) giving them a go with Saphir Renovateur to “cut through some of the stubborn old polish”; and d) applying a little Saphir Medaille d’Or brown wax to the microcreases to further try to dissolve any remaining black gunk.

He did a remarkable job. As you can see, the Lobbs do indeed look 100% better, or more. The leather is remarkably resilient; in most places, it could pass as brand-new. There’s still some slight creasing near the front of the shoes, and the black polish that was ground into those creases hasn’t completely vanished. But these are much, much better than presentable, which was my original goal. I think they look fantastic.

Next time I plan to do the job myself. All it took was some quality products, a little know-how, and a lot of elbow grease.  As I said: don’t give up on good shoes. 

(Source: andrewromano)

6:22 am - Sat, Jun 4, 2011
29 notes
"Designer Jessi Arrington packed nothing for TED but 7 pairs of undies,  buying the rest of her clothes in thrift stores around LA. It’s a  meditation on conscious consumption — wrapped in a rainbow of color and  creativity.”
via TED
Editor’s note: At the end of Jessi’s week-long stay in southern California, she donated the locally purchased clothes to area organizations. Among the general points she conveys are: 1) people don’t need to buy or wear new clothes, or spend a lot of money on them, and 2) people don’t need to get emotionally attached to things.

"Designer Jessi Arrington packed nothing for TED but 7 pairs of undies, buying the rest of her clothes in thrift stores around LA. It’s a meditation on conscious consumption — wrapped in a rainbow of color and creativity.”

via TED

Editor’s note: At the end of Jessi’s week-long stay in southern California, she donated the locally purchased clothes to area organizations. Among the general points she conveys are: 1) people don’t need to buy or wear new clothes, or spend a lot of money on them, and 2) people don’t need to get emotionally attached to things.

3:48 pm - Thu, Apr 28, 2011
27 notes

Two [Brown University] undergraduates have teamed up to create Brown’s first student-run thrift store, providing an outlet for students to donate, exchange and buy used goods. The Vault, which opened two weeks ago, was started by Hannah Winkler ‘13 and Tara Noble ‘12.5 in the hopes of providing various environmentally friendly ways for the community to handle unwanted items.

There are three components to the Vault — a thrift store, an item exchange and a workshop. The thrift store currently sells clothes, jewelry, books and other accessories donated by students, and Winkler said she also hopes to offer housewares in the future. For the item exchange, Brown students can bring in their unwanted clothing or other items to receive store credit for other goods in the thrift store.

The Vault is also unique in that it offers various workshops that align with Winkler and Noble’s goal of upcycling, a process that converts old or useless materials into items that have more value and a positive environmental impact.

The Vault offered a T-shirt workshop Monday in Salomon, where students could bring in used clothing and upcycle them into other items, such as bags or wristbands. Noble said other workshops are also planned for the future, on papermaking, repair-and-mending and seasonal workshops.

Would love to see student-entrepreneurs launch similar ventures on or near other college campuses.

12:59 pm - Fri, Mar 11, 2011
366 notes
Via thingsorganizedneatly:

SUBMISSION: The yarn I’m using to knit my sweater. Before I dyed it, but after I unraveled it from the old thrift store sweater it once was.
Organized neatly under feline supervision, of course.

Yarn reuse — it’s Unconsumption, via the awesome Things Organized Neatly Tumblr! [Bonus: Sweet cat pic!]

Via thingsorganizedneatly:

SUBMISSION: The yarn I’m using to knit my sweater. Before I dyed it, but after I unraveled it from the old thrift store sweater it once was.

Organized neatly under feline supervision, of course.

Yarn reuse — it’s Unconsumption, via the awesome Things Organized Neatly Tumblr! [Bonus: Sweet cat pic!]

1:44 pm - Tue, Dec 21, 2010
42 notes
 
Thrifting goes upscale, continued:

First lady Michelle Obama surprised the fashion world when she appeared at the recent “Christmas in Washington” concert in a black dress with a black lace overlay purchased from a New York vintage shop.
It is believed to be the first time that a first lady has worn a second-hand dress to a high-profile public event.

Second hand clothes: Michelle Obama wears vintage and fashion world gasps - CultureMap Houston

Thrifting goes upscale, continued:

First lady Michelle Obama surprised the fashion world when she appeared at the recent “Christmas in Washington” concert in a black dress with a black lace overlay purchased from a New York vintage shop.

It is believed to be the first time that a first lady has worn a second-hand dress to a high-profile public event.

Second hand clothes: Michelle Obama wears vintage and fashion world gasps - CultureMap Houston

12:31 pm
42 notes
Via nprfreshair:

Thrifting Goes Upscale and High-Tech: In its search for new revenue, Goodwill Industries has been  supplementing its retail stores with high-end boutiques that sell  designer donations. It’s also selling a lot more of its donated goods  online through auction sites. This year, it expects to make about $5  million in online sales.

Via nprfreshair:

Thrifting Goes Upscale and High-Tech: In its search for new revenue, Goodwill Industries has been supplementing its retail stores with high-end boutiques that sell designer donations. It’s also selling a lot more of its donated goods online through auction sites. This year, it expects to make about $5 million in online sales.

10:32 am - Thu, Aug 19, 2010
17 notes
sathriftstoregold:

Got this whole lot for a grand total of $2.11! Looking forward to using them all to hold goodies for a party I am throwing next weekend.

This is great — and a good riff off the shopping haul video trend:
The Salvation Army is encouraging thrift store shoppers to post their finds (example featured above) on its Tumblr site, Salvation Army Thrift Store Gold: http://sathriftstoregold.tumblr.com.
Perhaps the site will help to inspire some people to visit thrift stores and/or to make donations of goods or money to The Salvation Army or other non-profit organizations. Whatever action takes place, I like the idea of the site.
[Note: I (Molly) reblogged this photo from The Salvation Army’s Tumblr which could be the reason why it’s showing up here as “posted by Lisa” with a tag of “submission” automatically appended to it.]

sathriftstoregold:

Got this whole lot for a grand total of $2.11! Looking forward to using them all to hold goodies for a party I am throwing next weekend.

This is great — and a good riff off the shopping haul video trend:

The Salvation Army is encouraging thrift store shoppers to post their finds (example featured above) on its Tumblr site, Salvation Army Thrift Store Gold: http://sathriftstoregold.tumblr.com.

Perhaps the site will help to inspire some people to visit thrift stores and/or to make donations of goods or money to The Salvation Army or other non-profit organizations. Whatever action takes place, I like the idea of the site.

[Note: I (Molly) reblogged this photo from The Salvation Army’s Tumblr which could be the reason why it’s showing up here as “posted by Lisa” with a tag of “submission” automatically appended to it.]

4:37 pm - Wed, Jun 23, 2010
2 notes
365 Dresses, 365 Days, $365 — Earth911.com
Armed with a vision, serious sewing know-how, and an optimistic “make it work” outlook, Gen Y-er Marisa Lynch (pictured above) has passed the halfway point toward her goal of creating a new clothing item (from an old one) each day, at a cost of only $1 per day (excluding labor), for an entire year. Marisa is chronicling her trash-to-treasure experiences at New Dress A Day, and on Facebook and Twitter (@newdressaday).
Photo caption, via Earth911:

Lynch models her favorite dress from Day 77, a short dress that started as a a two-piece frock that screamed “Little House on the Prairie.”

365 Dresses, 365 Days, $365 — Earth911.com

Armed with a vision, serious sewing know-how, and an optimistic “make it work” outlook, Gen Y-er Marisa Lynch (pictured above) has passed the halfway point toward her goal of creating a new clothing item (from an old one) each day, at a cost of only $1 per day (excluding labor), for an entire year. Marisa is chronicling her trash-to-treasure experiences at New Dress A Day, and on Facebook and Twitter (@newdressaday).

Photo caption, via Earth911:

Lynch models her favorite dress from Day 77, a short dress that started as a a two-piece frock that screamed “Little House on the Prairie.”

11:56 am - Wed, May 12, 2010
4 notes
Score! is part swap meet, part Brooklyn loft party, and part free shopping spree. It all began last spring when Jennifer Lyon and Jenny Gottstein were cleaning out their offices at BKLYN YARD. They were left with a lot of usable things they no longer wanted or needed which led to the idea for Score! Instead of throwing things away, a venue is chosen, a professional industry curator organizes the best stuff, and people can trade things they never use for something they’ve always wanted, like a Homer Simpson wine opener. At the end of the event, whatever hasn’t found a new home is donated to charity. 
Start cleaning out your closet, the next swap is coming up on May 29th at BKLYN YARD.
via PSFK

Score! is part swap meet, part Brooklyn loft party, and part free shopping spree. It all began last spring when Jennifer Lyon and Jenny Gottstein were cleaning out their offices at BKLYN YARD. They were left with a lot of usable things they no longer wanted or needed which led to the idea for Score! Instead of throwing things away, a venue is chosen, a professional industry curator organizes the best stuff, and people can trade things they never use for something they’ve always wanted, like a Homer Simpson wine opener. At the end of the event, whatever hasn’t found a new home is donated to charity.

Start cleaning out your closet, the next swap is coming up on May 29th at BKLYN YARD.


via PSFK

2:57 pm - Mon, Jun 1, 2009
3 notes
For the Greenest Office, Buy Vintage. Buy Thrift. Recycle.
With all the hubbub about green products, the point that everyone seems to miss is that the greenest move of all is to buy used stuff. Variously called “vintage,” “thrift,” or “second hand,” its updated name might simply be Cradle-to-Curb-to-Cradle. Stylewise, there doesn’t have to be any trade-offs, as this clever new office redesign by I29, a young architecture firm, proves. All of the pieces were sourced from local flea markets in Amsterdam; they were then given a contemporary, oh-so-Dutch look using with environmentally friendly spray paint. The design fits the client—an ad agency called Gummo—pretty well…
(read the rest on Fast Company)

For the Greenest Office, Buy Vintage. Buy Thrift. Recycle.

With all the hubbub about green products, the point that everyone seems to miss is that the greenest move of all is to buy used stuff. Variously called “vintage,” “thrift,” or “second hand,” its updated name might simply be Cradle-to-Curb-to-Cradle. Stylewise, there doesn’t have to be any trade-offs, as this clever new office redesign by I29, a young architecture firm, proves. All of the pieces were sourced from local flea markets in Amsterdam; they were then given a contemporary, oh-so-Dutch look using with environmentally friendly spray paint. The design fits the client—an ad agency called Gummo—pretty well…

(read the rest on Fast Company)

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