Posts tagged tabletop tree
2:49 pm - Fri, Jan 4, 2013
78 notes
What do you do with your old holiday cards? 
Perhaps you cut the fronts of cards into pieces for use as tags on gifts, or as ornaments on trees, or to hang on string as garland/bunting? 
If you find a card’s artwork really attractive, maybe you’ve placed it in an old frame (or in a great frame you scored at a yard sale or thrift store), or displayed it in a CD case, and used it as decor? 
Here’s a different idea: You could make a tabletop tree or two, like the ones pictured above from Better Homes and Gardens (use a chopstick for the “trunk”), or make a mini tree like one we featured earlier (example here, another here).
Do you receive fewer holiday cards than you used to? I think many of us do — and many of us appreciate the fact that our friends and/or family members no longer send them! 
So, tell us: What do you do with old cards?

What do you do with your old holiday cards? 

Perhaps you cut the fronts of cards into pieces for use as tags on gifts, or as ornaments on trees, or to hang on string as garland/bunting

If you find a card’s artwork really attractive, maybe you’ve placed it in an old frame (or in a great frame you scored at a yard sale or thrift store), or displayed it in a CD case, and used it as decor? 

Here’s a different idea: You could make a tabletop tree or two, like the ones pictured above from Better Homes and Gardens (use a chopstick for the “trunk”), or make a mini tree like one we featured earlier (example here, another here).

Do you receive fewer holiday cards than you used to? I think many of us do — and many of us appreciate the fact that our friends and/or family members no longer send them! 

So, tell us: What do you do with old cards?

8:56 am - Wed, Dec 12, 2012
369 notes
christmasdecorating:


DIY Christmas Tree Tutorial Here



Postcards! 
4:13 pm - Fri, Dec 7, 2012
184 notes
radio-ladi0:




This is my creation for the “Tree of the Year” competition.
The materials in the tree are circuits from electronic waste.
All materials are recycled.





We thought we’d seen Christmas trees made from just about everything. Now there’s this cool one made from e-waste! Love!

radio-ladi0:

This is my creation for the “Tree of the Year” competition.

The materials in the tree are circuits from electronic waste.

All materials are recycled.

We thought we’d seen Christmas trees made from just about everything. Now there’s this cool one made from e-waste! Love!

12:38 pm - Thu, Dec 6, 2012
237 notes
Repurposing for the holidays
Why not turn egg cartons into a tree? Or make ornaments out of them?
For additional reuse ideas and inspiration, check out the gallery of trees made from repurposed materials here, and other items — ornaments, garland, wreaths, and more — here.
(photo: Colégio Bernardette Romeira)

Repurposing for the holidays

Why not turn egg cartons into a tree? Or make ornaments out of them?

For additional reuse ideas and inspiration, check out the gallery of trees made from repurposed materials here, and other items — ornaments, garland, wreaths, and more — here.

(photo: Colégio Bernardette Romeira)

2:18 pm - Sun, Dec 25, 2011
50 notes
Now here’s a little Unconsumption-y holiday spirit.
(Spotted on Pinterest, via 2gypsygirls.)
More funnel repurposing here.

Now here’s a little Unconsumption-y holiday spirit.

(Spotted on Pinterest, via 2gypsygirls.)

More funnel repurposing here.

5:00 pm - Tue, Dec 20, 2011
26 notes

If you’re decorating a small space or looking for less flashy holiday centerpiece options, this cardboard Christmas tree photo tutorial from Craftberry Bush is for you! Cardboard is always a great low-cost  decorating option, and these trees would add the perfect amount of  sparkle to any table, itty bitty apartment, or dorm room!

More: How-To: Cardboard Christmas Tree @Craftzine.com blog
Craftberry Bush projects also mentioned in this earlier Unconsumption post.

If you’re decorating a small space or looking for less flashy holiday centerpiece options, this cardboard Christmas tree photo tutorial from Craftberry Bush is for you! Cardboard is always a great low-cost decorating option, and these trees would add the perfect amount of sparkle to any table, itty bitty apartment, or dorm room!

More: How-To: Cardboard Christmas Tree @Craftzine.com blog

Craftberry Bush projects also mentioned in this earlier Unconsumption post.

9:14 am
31 notes

Create your own Makedo Christmas tree these holidays. All you have to do  is download the template file available here on instructables and go to  mymakedo.com for a Makedo KIT for THREE.

I read the above passage (on Instructables, here: Makedo Christmas tree) and said: “Cool! … What?”
What I mean is: This cardboard-box tree looks appealing, but what is “a Makedo KIT for THREE”?
Here is what I found:

Open ended creativity: Makedo’s family-sized set of award winning connectors: Turn cardboard boxes, paper cups, plastic bottles, lids and other household packaging into amazing recycled artworks with the Makedo Freeplay set of connectors.
Makedo’s Freeplay Kit provides all the tools and reusable connectors to build your own masterpiece. Kit for Three is the perfect family sized set with plenty of parts to make 7-8 smaller creations or 1-2 that are really big. You decide.
This kit includes two plastic safe-saws for punching holes in thick cardboard or plastic and cutting it down to size; and the clever re-clips and lock-hinges let you connect materials together quickly and easily. Makedo parts are  reusable so next time create something totally different. And then do  it all again.

I wasn’t familiar with Makedo, but its offerings sound like a potentially helpful way of converting all kinds of secondary materials into amusing new items — not just for the holidays.

Create your own Makedo Christmas tree these holidays. All you have to do is download the template file available here on instructables and go to mymakedo.com for a Makedo KIT for THREE.

I read the above passage (on Instructables, here: Makedo Christmas tree) and said: “Cool! … What?”

What I mean is: This cardboard-box tree looks appealing, but what is “a Makedo KIT for THREE”?

Here is what I found:

Open ended creativity: Makedo’s family-sized set of award winning connectors: Turn cardboard boxes, paper cups, plastic bottles, lids and other household packaging into amazing recycled artworks with the Makedo Freeplay set of connectors.

Makedo’s Freeplay Kit provides all the tools and reusable connectors to build your own masterpiece. Kit for Three is the perfect family sized set with plenty of parts to make 7-8 smaller creations or 1-2 that are really big. You decide.

This kit includes two plastic safe-saws for punching holes in thick cardboard or plastic and cutting it down to size; and the clever re-clips and lock-hinges let you connect materials together quickly and easily. Makedo parts are reusable so next time create something totally different. And then do it all again.

I wasn’t familiar with Makedo, but its offerings sound like a potentially helpful way of converting all kinds of secondary materials into amusing new items — not just for the holidays.


5:11 pm - Wed, Dec 14, 2011
75 notes
More books = more Christmas trees
Okay, so I keep thinking that I won’t post other holiday-related items. And then I come across things that we haven’t shared here on Unconsumption, and I feel compelled to post them!
So, here we go: Four additional examples of trees made from books.
(“Tree” pictured above via Goose Hill. Thanks to Annie for pointing it out to me.)

(via The Blog on the Bookshelf)
If you aren’t too worried about your books’ bindings/spines, you could make something like this:

(via Aga Inés on Flickr)

(via Real Simple)
For other book tree examples, check out these earlier Unconsumption posts. Tabletop trees? Look here. Alternative Christmas trees, in general, and other holiday tree-related posts: here.

More books = more Christmas trees

Okay, so I keep thinking that I won’t post other holiday-related items. And then I come across things that we haven’t shared here on Unconsumption, and I feel compelled to post them!

So, here we go: Four additional examples of trees made from books.

(“Tree” pictured above via Goose Hill. Thanks to Annie for pointing it out to me.)

(via The Blog on the Bookshelf)

If you aren’t too worried about your books’ bindings/spines, you could make something like this:

(via Aga Inés on Flickr)

(via Real Simple)

For other book tree examples, check out these earlier Unconsumption posts. Tabletop trees? Look here. Alternative Christmas trees, in general, and other holiday tree-related posts: here.

8:56 am - Mon, Dec 12, 2011
280 notes

mollyblock:

How-to: Make a “paper tree” in five easy steps

This project was inspired by two things: 1.) A neat “printed paper pine” item from Anthropologie, and 2.) my discovery, in the attic of my parents’ house, of an assortment of vintage sheet music — mainly trumpet and saxophone parts from the 1950s-1970s (that hadn’t been touched since the 1970s) when my father played in a band. 

Materials needed:

  • One chopstick
  • Something into which the chopstick can be anchored, like a scrap piece of wood, so the stick stands vertically (I upcycled an old plastic reel-to-reel tape spool as a base)
  • Several pages of printed sheet music, pages from a discarded book (or book you’ll no longer read), old holiday cards, or pages from magazines or catalogs
  • A piece of cardboard, roughly 1.5’x2’ in size 

Tools: 

  • Pinking shears, or something else that provides a decorative edge
  • Scissors
  • An ice pick, or other hole-punching device
  • Optional: Glue, small nail, hammer

Estimated time for completion: 

  • A couple of hours, though you probably can multi-task (read blogs, like I did, or watch TV) while working. 

Steps:

  1. Using pinking shears, or another cutting tool, cut the music (or other paper pieces) into squares. I cut my largest square approximately 5” x 5”, and smallest 1” x 1”. As I went along, I didn’t measure the pieces, but estimated the size based on that of the squares I’d just cut. For one tree, I used 40 paper squares. 
  2. Next, use scissors to cut the cardboard into small squares to add as spacers between the paper squares. The cardboard squares should be considerably smaller than the paper squares — that’ll help make the cardboard less visible. (I used a piece of recycled cardboard that held a case of cat food — it’s thinner and less rigid than some cardboard which made it easier to cut, I think.) Cut out the same number of cardboard squares as you have paper squares. 
  3. Poke holes in the center of the paper and cardboard squares. With an ice pick, I was able to punch holes through several squares at the same time. (Your mileage may vary.)
  4. Next, place your chopstick in whatever object you have handy to use as a base. You may want to nail or glue the chopstick into/onto your object. (I didn’t need to — my chopstick fits pretty snugly into my base.) 
  5. Now place the cardboard and paper squares onto the chopstick, pushing them down from the chopstick’s tapered end. Start with your largest square of cardboard, then add your largest piece of music on top of it. Continue stacking the cardboard and paper squares, keeping an eye on how your “tree” is shaping up. Hopefully, it’s a nice cone shape. 

As your layering of squares nears the top of the chopstick, stop at whatever point you want to. You could put a dot of glue on the topmost cardboard piece and paper square, to hold them in place. (I’d like to take the tree apart after the holidays — to store everything flat in a box — so I didn’t add glue.) Also, I left my chopstick top bare because I like the minimal look of it. You may want to “top” your tree with something.  

 That’s it. Place your tree on a table, and enjoy!  

Note: This project carries a stamp of approval from Veto, my feline quality control officer.

Yes, yours truly (Unconsumptioneer Molly) posted a tutorial for something I made. Hope it inspires you to make something of your own! 

8:25 am - Sun, Dec 4, 2011
89 notes

From the Unconsumption archive:

Some favorite DIY holiday decor ideas:

Reindeergarland, and trees made from corks.

3:45 pm - Fri, Nov 25, 2011
32 notes
It’s wine o’clock (somewhere) … 
Which means it’s time to share a wine-related repurposing find. Today’s item: Wine corks arranged into the shape of a Christmas tree. (This tree’s made by 4EyesAndEars on Etsy.)
If you’ve missed some posts in our wine o’clock series, or want to look again at some earlier posts for inspiration to make something of your own, check out the Unconsumption archive here. 

It’s wine o’clock (somewhere) … 

Which means it’s time to share a wine-related repurposing find. Today’s item: Wine corks arranged into the shape of a Christmas tree. (This tree’s made by 4EyesAndEars on Etsy.)

If you’ve missed some posts in our wine o’clock series, or want to look again at some earlier posts for inspiration to make something of your own, check out the Unconsumption archive here

6:05 pm - Fri, Mar 11, 2011
4 notes
Via nestfullofeggs:

cork trees

Yet another reason to save corks — and drink wine!
Other reasons here, in Unconsumption’s collection of wine-related repurposing posts.
À votre santé!

Via nestfullofeggs:

cork trees

Yet another reason to save corks — and drink wine!

Other reasons here, in Unconsumption’s collection of wine-related repurposing posts.

À votre santé!

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