Posts tagged sharing
11:57 am - Tue, Jul 17, 2012
56 notes
Here’s an impressive variation on the “share economy” idea. It does involve a rental fee, but it clearly makes tools available in an efficient way, with positive results.  

Since opening last year, Charlotte’s ToolBank has equipped more than 11,000 volunteers at 500 different projects, lending tools with a combined retail value of $243,000 for only $7,200. It now provides 134 nonprofit agencies with tools.
The Charlotte location is just one of several ToolBanks nationwide. The original, Atlanta Community ToolBank, celebrated its 20th anniversary last year. Baltimore’s ToolBank opened at the end of May, and another is scheduled to open in Cincinnati later this summer. Local nonprofits can rent tools for just three percent of the cost of the tool, multiplied by the number of weeks it’s needed. A shovel that normally costs $30 to buy? A paltry $1.80 cents to rent it for two weeks from the ToolBank.
The rentals fees are just “enough to get people to bring the tools back,” says Patty Russart, who has served as executive director of Atlanta’s ToolBank for nearly four years.

(via The Awesome Power of ToolBanks - Neighborhoods - The Atlantic Cities)

Here’s an impressive variation on the “share economy” idea. It does involve a rental fee, but it clearly makes tools available in an efficient way, with positive results. 

Since opening last year, Charlotte’s ToolBank has equipped more than 11,000 volunteers at 500 different projects, lending tools with a combined retail value of $243,000 for only $7,200. It now provides 134 nonprofit agencies with tools.

The Charlotte location is just one of several ToolBanks nationwide. The original, Atlanta Community ToolBank, celebrated its 20th anniversary last year. Baltimore’s ToolBank opened at the end of May, and another is scheduled to open in Cincinnati later this summer. Local nonprofits can rent tools for just three percent of the cost of the tool, multiplied by the number of weeks it’s needed. A shovel that normally costs $30 to buy? A paltry $1.80 cents to rent it for two weeks from the ToolBank.

The rentals fees are just “enough to get people to bring the tools back,” says Patty Russart, who has served as executive director of Atlanta’s ToolBank for nearly four years.

(via The Awesome Power of ToolBanks - Neighborhoods - The Atlantic Cities)

5:38 pm - Wed, Jul 11, 2012
175 notes
Urban intervention du jour:
Give away stuff via a sidewalk “swap box,” made from an old drawer.
Spotted by Neal LaMontagne in Vancouver, BC.
Photo used with permission. [Thanks, Neal!]

Urban intervention du jour:

Give away stuff via a sidewalk “swap box,” made from an old drawer.

Spotted by Neal LaMontagne in Vancouver, BC.

Photo used with permission. [Thanks, Neal!]

2:02 pm
38 notes
Over the past couple of years, we’ve followed the rise of NeighborGoods, the site that enables neighbors to share stuff. (Why buy a new drill that you might use only twice a year; instead, borrow one from a neighbor, and perhaps get to know that neighbor!)
NeighborGoods is among the collaborative consumption services we’ve mentioned a couple of times. It’s with some surprise to learn this news from the company:

Our team has very big news that we want to share with you. After three amazing years, 25,000 incredible neighbors and over $4.5 million of inventory being shared, NeighborGoods.net will be shutting its doors. We would like to share what this means for you and your account.
Over the next three weeks we will be preparing for our shutdown which will be happening July 31st. We strongly encourage you to complete any open transactions by this date. After today we will no longer be accepting group subscriptions or account verifications.
Although this is goodbye for NeighborGoods we are excited to announce that members of our team have created a brand new sharing tool, Favortree. Favortree is a ‘play it forward’ trading game [favor-trading game/app] for universities, faith communities and local neighborhoods. Members can help each other by sharing goods and completing small favors. By helping your friends and neighbors, you earn rewards which you can exchange for help when you need it.

Read the rest: Goodbye NeighborGoods; Hello Favortree!
"Shutting its doors," with no explanation why? Anyone know?
Related: TheNextWeb post on the Favortree game/app.

Over the past couple of years, we’ve followed the rise of NeighborGoods, the site that enables neighbors to share stuff. (Why buy a new drill that you might use only twice a year; instead, borrow one from a neighbor, and perhaps get to know that neighbor!)

NeighborGoods is among the collaborative consumption services we’ve mentioned a couple of times. It’s with some surprise to learn this news from the company:

Our team has very big news that we want to share with you. After three amazing years, 25,000 incredible neighbors and over $4.5 million of inventory being shared, NeighborGoods.net will be shutting its doors. We would like to share what this means for you and your account.

Over the next three weeks we will be preparing for our shutdown which will be happening July 31st. We strongly encourage you to complete any open transactions by this date. After today we will no longer be accepting group subscriptions or account verifications.

Although this is goodbye for NeighborGoods we are excited to announce that members of our team have created a brand new sharing tool, Favortree. Favortree is a ‘play it forward’ trading game [favor-trading game/app] for universities, faith communities and local neighborhoods. Members can help each other by sharing goods and completing small favors. By helping your friends and neighbors, you earn rewards which you can exchange for help when you need it.

Read the rest: Goodbye NeighborGoods; Hello Favortree!

"Shutting its doors," with no explanation why? Anyone know?

Related: TheNextWeb post on the Favortree game/app.

8:55 am - Fri, Jun 8, 2012
146 notes

I was quite interested to read — via the link to Atlantic Cities above as well as on Science Daily — about research suggesting that “Freecycle generates feelings of group unity and cohesion [PDF] among the people who participate in it.”

Freecycle is the “hey I have this thing if you want it let me know” service that I wrote about some years ago, calling the underlying practice “unconsumption.” My interest then was: “It’s worth pondering whether getting rid of stuff can ever feel as good as getting it.” I more or less concluded the answer was Yes, and eventually that led to this very site you are reading right now.

Obviously we’ve gotten more expansive about what unconsumption means, but our advocacy of “creative reuse and mindful consumer behavior” still ties back to the very notions that these researchers have examined. Here’s a little more on their study:

Sociologists have long been intrigued by these kinds of benevolent “generalized exchange communities.” … What motivates people to participate in them?

"This old idea that gift-giving communities generate lots of solidarity, is it true and does it hold up outside of the lab?" asks Robb Willer, a sociologist at the University of California. "We found that it does."

Freecycle generates feelings of group unity and cohesion [PDF] among the people who participate in it. “First, you sort of build this feeling of group identification,” Willer says. “Then you build this feeling of solidarity. Then after that you’re more motivated to give to the system.”

Interestingly, you don’t get the same benefits from participating on Craigslist, which is a more traditional type of “direct exchange system” based on the quid pro quo that you’ll give me something – probably cash – in return for my old love seat. The researchers drew their conclusions by conducting extensive surveys of hundreds of users of both of these networks.

3:27 pm - Sat, Jun 2, 2012
465 notes
We’re fans of free book exchanges, like the Little Free Libraries; the now-defunct-phone-booths-turned-mini-libraries (here, here, here, here, and here); shelves in London Tube and train stations and in airports that enable travelers to swap books; former newspaper racks; and a 1979 Ford transformed into a bookmobile from which free books are distributed in Buenos Aires, among others, that spring up in public spaces. 
(We’re also fond of more traditional libraries that are housed in non-traditional settings like repurposed old buses and historic barns and churches.)
And now in Paris, there’s this communal book exchange sitting atop a tree cage: 

Strasbourg-based street artist Florian Rivière is back with a new, neat urban intervention! Last weekend, Rivière installed a little library on a sidewalk near Gare du Nord … .

I don’t know if that’s a pallet or a crate (or both), but I like it!
See a couple of Riviere’s other urban interventions, a.k.a., “hacktions,” here.
(via Urban Hacktivist Launches Street Library — The Pop-Up City)

We’re fans of free book exchanges, like the Little Free Libraries; the now-defunct-phone-booths-turned-mini-libraries (here, here, here, here, and here); shelves in London Tube and train stations and in airports that enable travelers to swap books; former newspaper racks; and a 1979 Ford transformed into a bookmobile from which free books are distributed in Buenos Aires, among others, that spring up in public spaces. 

(We’re also fond of more traditional libraries that are housed in non-traditional settings like repurposed old buses and historic barns and churches.)

And now in Paris, there’s this communal book exchange sitting atop a tree cage: 

Strasbourg-based street artist Florian Rivière is back with a new, neat urban intervention! Last weekend, Rivière installed a little library on a sidewalk near Gare du Nord … .

I don’t know if that’s a pallet or a crate (or both), but I like it!

See a couple of Riviere’s other urban interventions, a.k.a., “hacktions,” here.

(via Urban Hacktivist Launches Street Library — The Pop-Up City)

5:18 am - Tue, Apr 10, 2012
8,155 notes

ianbrooks:

Weapon of Mass Instruction

Built from a welded frame atop a 1979 Ford Falcon, Raul Lemesoff drives around the streets of Buenos Aires distributing free books to anybody who wants to be assaulted with some serious learnin’.

(via: make / laughingsquid)

A mobile library (art car) that’s helping to foster an interest in both reading and sharing books in Argentina? Auto-reblog for Unconsumption’s celebration of book-things during National Library Week.

(via gillianmae)

3:52 pm - Mon, Apr 9, 2012
414 notes
Happy National Library Week — the annual celebration, led by the American Library Association, of all things library! This week, in honor of Library Week, we’ll feature a series of library- and book-related posts.
Today, the Unconsumption spotlight is on Little Free Libraries: community book exchanges — located in places like your neighbor’s front yard, and on college campuses and in hospitals — where library cards aren’t needed. The libraries’ basic concept is: “Take a book. Leave a book.”
Most of the “libraries,” which hold 20-30 donated books, are made from reclaimed materials. Each library, which has an official caretaker who builds and maintains it, is registered by the Little Free Library (LFL) project, with its location noted on the LFL Web site. So far, more than 200 little libraries have opened in 34 states and 17 countries.
The libraries not only provide a way for people to pass along books they no longer want, they also help foster a sense of community. In this NPR story on the Little Free Library project, a library user says: “there are all of these nice, little serendipitous connections that happen with your neighbors.” A library caretaker mentioned meeting, via her free library, neighbors who live a block away — neighbors she hadn’t met previously. 
Through the non-profit project, LFL co-founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks aim to promote literacy and love of reading; they also hope that more people (you, perhaps?) will contact them about opening free little libraries in their own communities!

See also:
Earlier Unconsumption posts on various community-driven book swaps, including several operating out of old phone booths, plus other swapping-related projects and services here. 
More on sharing and the sharing economy / collaborative consumption, libraries, and books.

Happy National Library Week — the annual celebration, led by the American Library Association, of all things library! This week, in honor of Library Week, we’ll feature a series of library- and book-related posts.

Today, the Unconsumption spotlight is on Little Free Libraries: community book exchanges — located in places like your neighbor’s front yard, and on college campuses and in hospitals — where library cards aren’t needed. The libraries’ basic concept is: “Take a book. Leave a book.”

Most of the “libraries,” which hold 20-30 donated books, are made from reclaimed materials. Each library, which has an official caretaker who builds and maintains it, is registered by the Little Free Library (LFL) project, with its location noted on the LFL Web site. So far, more than 200 little libraries have opened in 34 states and 17 countries.

The libraries not only provide a way for people to pass along books they no longer want, they also help foster a sense of community. In this NPR story on the Little Free Library project, a library user says: “there are all of these nice, little serendipitous connections that happen with your neighbors.” A library caretaker mentioned meeting, via her free library, neighbors who live a block away — neighbors she hadn’t met previously. 

Through the non-profit project, LFL co-founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks aim to promote literacy and love of reading; they also hope that more people (you, perhaps?) will contact them about opening free little libraries in their own communities!

See also:

11:09 am - Thu, Feb 23, 2012
30 notes

Got a road trip coming up? Why not use Ridejoy to save yourself the gas money and maybe make a new friend in the process? The site’s a lot like apartment/room-share site AirBnB. It leverages the power of the web to connect people so that they can use their resources more efficiently — and, of course, save money in the process.

Here’s how it works. You post an upcoming road trip on the site, name your price (sharing the cost of the gas, say) and see who’s interested. Like AirBnB, connections to your real Facebook profile and reviews by others who have met you through the site help establish that you’re not an ax murderer or whatever.

Let us know if you use the site. 

Related: Earlier Unconsumption posts on sharing-oriented programs and services here.

8:55 am - Thu, Oct 13, 2011
1,052 notes
Old bus = new public library in Bulgaria.
Designed by Studio 8 1/2.
(via Old Bulgarian Trolleybus Transformed Into New Otets Paisiy Public Library | Inhabitat)
3:58 pm - Wed, Jun 29, 2011
111 notes
Via fastcompany:

A new survey by the American Library Association shows that 99.3% of  public libraries offer free access to the web even if you don’t have a  PC and 67% offer e-books. Summer just got a whole lot cooler. 
Picture via guillermogg on Flickr

Related: Earlier Unconsumption post on libraries.

Via fastcompany:

A new survey by the American Library Association shows that 99.3% of public libraries offer free access to the web even if you don’t have a PC and 67% offer e-books. Summer just got a whole lot cooler.

Picture via guillermogg on Flickr

Related: Earlier Unconsumption post on libraries.

(via pewinternet)

3:42 pm - Thu, Jun 2, 2011
52 notes
Via curiositycounts:

Getaround – new social car-sharing service lets you rent out your own set of wheels and borrow others’, another fantastic way to have more by owning less.

Related: Earlier Unconsumption posts about various sharing programs and services, several of which are also peer-to-peer, here.

Via curiositycounts:

Getaround – new social car-sharing service lets you rent out your own set of wheels and borrow others’, another fantastic way to have more by owning less.

Related: Earlier Unconsumption posts about various sharing programs and services, several of which are also peer-to-peer, here.

(Source: curiositycounts, via poptech)

6:44 pm - Sun, May 29, 2011
9 notes

Boulder B-Cycle Launch from FearLess Cottage on Vimeo.

In this video, friend of Unconsumption Alex Bogusky talks about bike-sharing and the launch of Boulder B-Cycle. It’s a nice little intro to the virtues of the bike, multiplied by the virtues of sharing.

B-Cycle mentioned on Unconsumption here; and here are previous posts on bikes, and bike sharing

More: FearLess Revolution - FearLess Blog - Boulder B-Cycle

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