Posts tagged scrap wood
12:20 pm - Thu, Jul 10, 2014
118 notes

Vietnamese office a21studio used recycled wood to construct the curving framework of this coffee house, which encircles a courtyard near the city of Nha Trang.
The Salvaged Ring structure was designed by a21studio for a carpenter who wanted to utilise a surplus of scrap wood collected over his career to build a coffee house near a motorway on the outskirts of the city.

More: Salvaged Ring coffee house by a21studĩo is made from scrap wood

Vietnamese office a21studio used recycled wood to construct the curving framework of this coffee house, which encircles a courtyard near the city of Nha Trang.

The Salvaged Ring structure was designed by a21studio for a carpenter who wanted to utilise a surplus of scrap wood collected over his career to build a coffee house near a motorway on the outskirts of the city.

More: Salvaged Ring coffee house by a21studĩo is made from scrap wood

4:41 pm - Fri, Feb 8, 2013
1,687 notes

Save wine bottles, make your own tables. 

Simply insert bottles in to openings in pieces of wood. In addition to use as table tops, the pieces of wood (in this case, they’re scrap wood sealed with a wax finish) can function as serving trays.

Brazilian designer Tati Guimarães designed this collection. We featured her metal frame that holds corks — for use as trivets, or to hang on a wall — on Unconsumption here (way back in June 2009!). Check out her site, Ciclus, for additional information.

See also: Earlier Unconsumption post on shelving made from wine bottles and pieces of wood.

For other items in Unconsumption’s wine o’clock series — an occasional series of posts highlighting examples of wine-related repurposing — browse here.

2:19 pm - Mon, Nov 19, 2012
40 notes
The “favela chair,” designed by brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana (mentioned previously here), was inspired by the architecture of shanty towns, a.k.a. favelas, in the Campanas’ native Brazil.
Each chair is hand-glued and nailed together from scrap wood, making each chair unique. 
Photo via SFMOMA, which is one of several museums with a favela chair in its permanent collection. 
Spotted in the last slide of this post from The New York Times design blog. (In the NYT piece, check out the LOT-EK lamp made from a detergent bottle!) 

The “favela chair,” designed by brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana (mentioned previously here), was inspired by the architecture of shanty towns, a.k.a. favelas, in the Campanas’ native Brazil.

Each chair is hand-glued and nailed together from scrap wood, making each chair unique. 

Photo via SFMOMA, which is one of several museums with a favela chair in its permanent collection. 

Spotted in the last slide of this post from The New York Times design blog. (In the NYT piece, check out the LOT-EK lamp made from a detergent bottle!) 

1:31 pm - Wed, Oct 24, 2012
87 notes

Brazilian designer Brunno Jahara of Jahara Studio has created a collection of furniture made using scrap wood. Called Neorustica, discarded strips of wood have been painted in bright colours and joined together to form cabinets.

(via Neorustica by Jahara Studio - Dezeen)

Brazilian designer Brunno Jahara of Jahara Studio has created a collection of furniture made using scrap wood. Called Neorustica, discarded strips of wood have been painted in bright colours and joined together to form cabinets.

(via Neorustica by Jahara Studio - Dezeen)

2:45 pm - Fri, Oct 12, 2012
253 notes
London-based artist duo Tim Noble and Sue Webster, whose work we first covered on Unconsumption in April 2009 (here), have opened their first solo exhibition in London since 2006.  

Tim Noble and Sue Webster take ordinary things including rubbish, to make assemblages and then point light to create projected shadows which show a great likeness to something identifiable including self-portraits. The art of projection is emblematic of transformative art. The process of transformation, from discarded waste, scrap metal or even taxidermy creatures to a recognizable image, echoes the idea of ‘perceptual psychology’ a form of evaluation used for psychological patients. Noble and Webster are familiar with this process and how people evaluate abstract forms. Throughout their careers they have played with the idea of how humans perceive abstract images and define them with meaning. The result is surprising and powerful as it redefines how abstract forms can transform into figurative ones.

The show, which features six large-scale sculptures, runs through November 24, 2012, at Blain|Southern. 
(via Nihilistic Optimistic: New Shadow Sculptures Built from Discarded Wood from Tim Noble and Sue Webster | Colossal)

London-based artist duo Tim Noble and Sue Webster, whose work we first covered on Unconsumption in April 2009 (here), have opened their first solo exhibition in London since 2006.  

Tim Noble and Sue Webster take ordinary things including rubbish, to make assemblages and then point light to create projected shadows which show a great likeness to something identifiable including self-portraits. The art of projection is emblematic of transformative art. The process of transformation, from discarded waste, scrap metal or even taxidermy creatures to a recognizable image, echoes the idea of ‘perceptual psychology’ a form of evaluation used for psychological patients. Noble and Webster are familiar with this process and how people evaluate abstract forms. Throughout their careers they have played with the idea of how humans perceive abstract images and define them with meaning. The result is surprising and powerful as it redefines how abstract forms can transform into figurative ones.

The show, which features six large-scale sculptures, runs through November 24, 2012, at Blain|Southern

(via Nihilistic Optimistic: New Shadow Sculptures Built from Discarded Wood from Tim Noble and Sue Webster | Colossal)

2:17 pm - Fri, Mar 9, 2012
45 notes
More scrap wood uses:
Colorado-based Everitt & Schilling Company repurposes scrap wood — from cabinet and door makers — as wall covering. E&S also has a line made from reclaimed barn wood. 
(via JetsonGreen)

More scrap wood uses:

Colorado-based Everitt & Schilling Company repurposes scrap wood — from cabinet and door makers — as wall covering. E&S also has a line made from reclaimed barn wood. 

(via JetsonGreen)

5:17 pm - Thu, Mar 8, 2012
41 notes
Tel Aviv-based Studio Ve makes its Endy line of furniture — stools, chairs, and coffee tables — from scrap wood from sawmills. (Apparently mills mark the sensitive ends of the planks by painting them, then typically discard them.) The painted areas play a prominent role in the design of the furniture pieces.
(via Design Milk)
For more uses of scrap wood, including other furniture items, scroll through the Unconsumption archive here.

Tel Aviv-based Studio Ve makes its Endy line of furniture — stools, chairs, and coffee tables — from scrap wood from sawmills. (Apparently mills mark the sensitive ends of the planks by painting them, then typically discard them.) The painted areas play a prominent role in the design of the furniture pieces.

(via Design Milk)

For more uses of scrap wood, including other furniture items, scroll through the Unconsumption archive here.

12:27 pm - Tue, Mar 6, 2012
76 notes

Friend of Unconsumption Will Holman, whose furniture and other repurposing projects we’ve highlighted several times (grouped here), used scrap wood to refresh a pair of damaged 35-year-old Steelcase credenzas.
For a project like this, Will says a variety of reclaimed wood, such as pallet wood, or old flooring or molding, could be used.
Check out Will’s photos and tutorial over on Instructables.

Friend of Unconsumption Will Holman, whose furniture and other repurposing projects we’ve highlighted several times (grouped here), used scrap wood to refresh a pair of damaged 35-year-old Steelcase credenzas.

For a project like this, Will says a variety of reclaimed wood, such as pallet wood, or old flooring or molding, could be used.

Check out Will’s photos and tutorial over on Instructables.

1:43 pm - Wed, Feb 22, 2012
66 notes
Pallet repurposing, continued:
Pallet wood used as wall covering.
How-to / DIY details: Grand Design
Reminds me of Piet Hein Eek’s “scrapwood wallpaper” (mentioned here), which is laid out vertically in a more staggered arrangement. Another reclaimed pallet wood wall application can be seen in the technology building on the Central Washington University campus (our post about it here).

Pallet repurposing, continued:

Pallet wood used as wall covering.

How-to / DIY details: Grand Design

Reminds me of Piet Hein Eek’s “scrapwood wallpaper” (mentioned here), which is laid out vertically in a more staggered arrangement. Another reclaimed pallet wood wall application can be seen in the technology building on the Central Washington University campus (our post about it here).

2:42 pm - Tue, Jan 31, 2012
56 notes
Chicago-based artist Dolan Geiman puts salvaged materials to good use in his “rescued wood constructions” and other mixed-media assemblages. Even his paint is recycled, obtained via the city of Chicago’s paint exchange program. Visit Dolan’s Web site and/or Etsy shop to check out some of his other artwork.

Chicago-based artist Dolan Geiman puts salvaged materials to good use in his “rescued wood constructions” and other mixed-media assemblages. Even his paint is recycled, obtained via the city of Chicago’s paint exchange program. Visit Dolan’s Web site and/or Etsy shop to check out some of his other artwork.

8:21 am - Sat, Dec 24, 2011
195 notes

Experimenting in his Brooklyn Gowanus neighborhood, designer/artisan Daniel Goers has created Scrap Ecology, a collection of design objects and sculptures created from wood scraps and other found materials, each containing a living component rendering them simultaneously as art, furniture, and ecological habitats.

Goers’s projects, according to the eco-crafter, aim to “rearrange the raw materials of our urban and natural environments into objects with new meaning and purpose.”

(via Scrap Ecology: Botanical Sculpture | Urban Gardens)

11:08 am - Wed, Nov 30, 2011
65 notes
There’s nothing like a deceiving piece of decorative furniture. Ubico Studio, a Tel Aviv-based design and production team, has created tree stump-shaped tables and stools from recycled wood scraps that are rescued from construction sites, dumpsters and other sites that would normally discard them. Although shaped like real tree stumps, the eclectic and mismatched surface gives them a cool upcycled look.
(via From Scrap To Stylish Stump: Recycled Timber Furniture By Ubico Studio : TreeHugger)

There’s nothing like a deceiving piece of decorative furniture. Ubico Studio, a Tel Aviv-based design and production team, has created tree stump-shaped tables and stools from recycled wood scraps that are rescued from construction sites, dumpsters and other sites that would normally discard them. Although shaped like real tree stumps, the eclectic and mismatched surface gives them a cool upcycled look.

(via From Scrap To Stylish Stump: Recycled Timber Furniture By Ubico Studio : TreeHugger)

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