Posts tagged reuse
12:20 pm - Sat, Sep 20, 2014
93 notes

This beautiful home in Croatia by DVA Arhitekta features recycled red brick that was actually waste from another renovation. Using this material allowed the architect to blend the modern blueprint better with its surroundings.
Big window panels allow lots of natural light inside and smart use of materials, gives the interior an upscale look. It’s not every day you see a modern building such as this made from brick — it feels like a slightly warmer option than concrete or stone.

(via Podfuscak Residence in Croatia by DVA Arhitekta - Design Milk)

This beautiful home in Croatia by DVA Arhitekta features recycled red brick that was actually waste from another renovation. Using this material allowed the architect to blend the modern blueprint better with its surroundings.

Big window panels allow lots of natural light inside and smart use of materials, gives the interior an upscale look. It’s not every day you see a modern building such as this made from brick — it feels like a slightly warmer option than concrete or stone.

(via Podfuscak Residence in Croatia by DVA Arhitekta - Design Milk)

3:40 pm - Tue, Sep 16, 2014
88 notes

Here’s an admirable design solution to the idea of the physical business card:

Designer: Cameron MollMaterial: Crane Lettra, Pearl Production: Letterpress; hand-cut and hand-stamped Printer: Bryce Knudson, Bjorn Press
…. 
“[My] cards are individually cut from my letterpress type posters using inventory that is damaged in some way (ink splatter, bent corner, etc) and stamped by hand,” Moll says.
- See more at: http://www.howdesign.com/how-design-blog/best-business-cards#sthash.XMF6BxDT.dpuf

 (via 14 Best Business Cards in the Biz - HOW Design)

Here’s an admirable design solution to the idea of the physical business card:

Designer: Cameron Moll
Material: Crane Lettra, Pearl
Production: Letterpress; hand-cut and hand-stamped
Printer: Bryce Knudson, Bjorn Press

…. 

“[My] cards are individually cut from my letterpress type posters using inventory that is damaged in some way (ink splatter, bent corner, etc) and stamped by hand,” Moll says.

- See more at: http://www.howdesign.com/how-design-blog/best-business-cards#sthash.XMF6BxDT.dpuf

 (via 14 Best Business Cards in the Biz - HOW Design)

3:40 pm - Tue, Sep 9, 2014
244 notes

The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.
A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.

A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

4:39 pm - Mon, Sep 8, 2014
65 notes

Israeli designer Lou Moria has used a vacuum-forming process to create pairs of plastic slippers that can be produced quickly and cheaply. 
[The shoes can] be created from a single piece of recyclable rubbery plastic. [This responded to] research on cheap shoes, which often comprise many different materials and are assembled as part of a long process.
[In this instance] the designer creates the shoes using vacuum forming technology. A plastic sheet is heated until it is soft and draped over a mould inside the forming machine. … 
Waste pieces of the material can be recycled and used to create more shoes, which are available in any colour.

Fascinating! More here, including a video: Lou Moria uses vacuum forming to create recyclable shoes in seconds

Israeli designer Lou Moria has used a vacuum-forming process to create pairs of plastic slippers that can be produced quickly and cheaply.

[The shoes can] be created from a single piece of recyclable rubbery plastic. [This responded to] research on cheap shoes, which often comprise many different materials and are assembled as part of a long process.

[In this instance] the designer creates the shoes using vacuum forming technology. A plastic sheet is heated until it is soft and draped over a mould inside the forming machine. …

Waste pieces of the material can be recycled and used to create more shoes, which are available in any colour.

Fascinating! More here, including a video: Lou Moria uses vacuum forming to create recyclable shoes in seconds

5:59 pm - Fri, Sep 5, 2014
72 notes
The Art of “Kipple”
A project from photographer Dan Tobin Smith was evidently inspired by Philp K. Dick’s notion of “Kipple”

"Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday’s homeopape [newspaper]. When nobody’s around, kipple reproduces itself… the entire universe is moving towards a final state of total, absolute kippleization." From Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

According to Creative Review, Tobin Smith set out to “create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects.”So there was an open call for stuff people didn’t want anymore. And now: 

Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
The concept of kipple, says Tobin Smith, “inspired me to start thinking about design and products – we make so much stuff but we’ve got limited resources. Often it’s bound up with taste, we think because it’s beautiful it’s okay – but if it’s useless, it’s useless.”

More here: Creative Review - Dan Tobin Smith’s art of useless objects

The Art of “Kipple”

A project from photographer Dan Tobin Smith was evidently inspired by Philp K. Dick’s notion of “Kipple”

"Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday’s homeopape [newspaper]. When nobody’s around, kipple reproduces itself… the entire universe is moving towards a final state of total, absolute kippleization." From Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

According to Creative Review, Tobin Smith set out to “create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects.”So there was an open call for stuff people didn’t want anymore. And now:

Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.

The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.

The concept of kipple, says Tobin Smith, “inspired me to start thinking about design and products – we make so much stuff but we’ve got limited resources. Often it’s bound up with taste, we think because it’s beautiful it’s okay – but if it’s useless, it’s useless.”

More here: Creative Review - Dan Tobin Smith’s art of useless objects

12:20 pm - Tue, Sep 2, 2014
34 notes

The other day I caught Noah and Charlotte (my two youngest) using some vintage picture books as their personal art canvases. And I mean the paper-tearing, marker-smearing, no-mercy kind of art.
Once I recovered from the initial devastation, it dawned on me that every form of destruction is also an opportunity for creation: why not use those “destroyed” children’s books as the canvas for wall art?
Personalized signs spelling out your child’s name add a cute touch to a cozy reading nook.
This is our new favorite project and we can’t wait to share how easy it is to make!

More: How-Tuesday: Upcycled Book Art | The Etsy Blog

The other day I caught Noah and Charlotte (my two youngest) using some vintage picture books as their personal art canvases. And I mean the paper-tearing, marker-smearing, no-mercy kind of art.

Once I recovered from the initial devastation, it dawned on me that every form of destruction is also an opportunity for creation: why not use those “destroyed” children’s books as the canvas for wall art?

Personalized signs spelling out your child’s name add a cute touch to a cozy reading nook.

This is our new favorite project and we can’t wait to share how easy it is to make!

More: How-Tuesday: Upcycled Book Art | The Etsy Blog

8:03 am - Mon, Aug 25, 2014
11,578 notes
theonion:



Experts: “We can just keep using the chairs we have.”


"According to the report, chair production can cease entirely with no negative consequences for American consumers, as the many good chairs now on store shelves and available at garage sales are sufficient to satisfy the country’s seating requirements for the immediate future." 
Amusing. And a good reminder that so many existing items can be found in second-hand shops and/or in antique stores, listed on Craigslist, Freecycle, eBay, and even found in many of your friends’ homes and/or those of family members (“hi, Dad!”); so why would consumers need to buy newly made merchandise?!
Yeah, reuse! 

theonion:

"According to the report, chair production can cease entirely with no negative consequences for American consumers, as the many good chairs now on store shelves and available at garage sales are sufficient to satisfy the country’s seating requirements for the immediate future." 

Amusing. And a good reminder that so many existing items can be found in second-hand shops and/or in antique stores, listed on Craigslist, Freecycle, eBay, and even found in many of your friends’ homes and/or those of family members (“hi, Dad!”); so why would consumers need to buy newly made merchandise?!

Yeah, reuse! 

3:19 pm - Sat, Aug 16, 2014
254 notes
DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS
Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components: 
Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).
Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  
A full video about the winning project below.

DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS

Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components:

Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).

Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  

A full video about the winning project below.

12:20 pm - Tue, Aug 12, 2014
125 notes

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.
This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.

This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

12:20 pm - Mon, Aug 11, 2014
167 notes

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures.
His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors.
You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson.

(via A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf | Colossal)

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures.

His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors.

You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson.

(via A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf | Colossal)

1:26 pm - Fri, Aug 8, 2014
61 notes
This sounds like our kinda show:

Premiering Friday, August 8th at 10PM on Pivot TV, Human Resources is a new reality series about TerraCycle, an innovative company whose mission is to “eliminate the idea of waste.”
TerraCycle is one of the fastest growing green companies in the world, and they’ll take anything and everything that is landfill-bound — from potato chip bags to cigarette butts — and recycles, up-cycles, re-uses, or otherwise transforms these objects into something else.

Learned about this from The New York Times: 

“Garbage is my passion,” Tiffany Threadgould, a designer, says in the premiere. “My ring is an old spoon. My earrings are bike parts.”
The first episode involves pitching a coffee-table book on recycling to a publisher. The second is about the no-separation “zero-waste boxes” the company tries to sell to small businesses.


If you know Uncon, you know that Threadgould is one of my heroes: Her amazing contributions to our Uncollection project added up to one of my favorite moments for this entire project.
So I will be watching. Hope you will too. More here: Human Resources | Pivot.tv

This sounds like our kinda show:

Premiering Friday, August 8th at 10PM on Pivot TV, Human Resources is a new reality series about TerraCycle, an innovative company whose mission is to “eliminate the idea of waste.”

TerraCycle is one of the fastest growing green companies in the world, and they’ll take anything and everything that is landfill-bound — from potato chip bags to cigarette butts — and recycles, up-cycles, re-uses, or otherwise transforms these objects into something else.

Learned about this from The New York Times:

“Garbage is my passion,” Tiffany Threadgould, a designer, says in the premiere. “My ring is an old spoon. My earrings are bike parts.”

The first episode involves pitching a coffee-table book on recycling to a publisher. The second is about the no-separation “zero-waste boxes” the company tries to sell to small businesses.

If you know Uncon, you know that Threadgould is one of my heroes: Her amazing contributions to our Uncollection project added up to one of my favorite moments for this entire project.

So I will be watching. Hope you will too. More here: Human Resources | Pivot.tv

3:40 pm - Mon, Aug 4, 2014
148 notes




Radamés Figueroa, who goes by “Juni,” is an artist who set aside his brushes to live in the trees…. 
"Tree House–Casa Club" (2013) is the result of the artist’s collaborative efforts in the Naguabo forest, where he and his friends built a tree house from raw materials found by the artist in San Juan over the course of nine months, and from readily available materials in the forest, such as stones and water for cement mix. 
Figueroa grew up using what he calls “tropical readymades”—riffing on Duchamp’s found object art—by turning his shoes and footballs into planters. 




 More: Tree House Retreat Made of Repurposed Materials | Dwell

Radamés Figueroa, who goes by “Juni,” is an artist who set aside his brushes to live in the trees….

"Tree House–Casa Club" (2013) is the result of the artist’s collaborative efforts in the Naguabo forest, where he and his friends built a tree house from raw materials found by the artist in San Juan over the course of nine months, and from readily available materials in the forest, such as stones and water for cement mix. 

Figueroa grew up using what he calls “tropical readymades”—riffing on Duchamp’s found object art—by turning his shoes and footballs into planters. 

 More: Tree House Retreat Made of Repurposed Materials | Dwell

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