Posts tagged reuse
3:40 pm - Wed, Apr 23, 2014
135 notes

Riding the bus in Detroit is not fun: Half of the city’s bus routes have been cancelled over the last decade, and waiting for a bus to show up can take as long as two hours. A new project is trying to make that wait a little more pleasant by building mobile bus shelters—and since this is Detroit, the shelters are made out of recycled parts from abandoned buildings.

More about the Door Stops project here: These Makeshift Detroit Bus Shelters Are Recycled From Abandoned Houses | Co.Exist | ideas impact

Riding the bus in Detroit is not fun: Half of the city’s bus routes have been cancelled over the last decade, and waiting for a bus to show up can take as long as two hours. A new project is trying to make that wait a little more pleasant by building mobile bus shelters—and since this is Detroit, the shelters are made out of recycled parts from abandoned buildings.

More about the Door Stops project here: These Makeshift Detroit Bus Shelters Are Recycled From Abandoned Houses | Co.Exist | ideas impact

12:20 pm - Wed, Apr 16, 2014
73 notes

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.
Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.
He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.

Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.

He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

3:40 pm - Tue, Apr 15, 2014
135 notes

junkculture:

Gasoline Canister Sculptures by Gerd Rohling

German artist Gerd Rohling creates sculptural pieces of art using found materials that he collects from the streets of Berlin. His exhibition titled “NOTHING FOR ALL” at gallery Piet Hein Eek features a series of brilliantly inventive sculptures made from discarded gasoline containers which he has simply cut into angular faces. Some of the faces seem to be sporting masks, while others have halos and hats made from rubber tires and waste baskets. Rohling’s work is a visually striking statement against pollution and serves as a reminder to recycle plastic waste.
3:40 pm - Sun, Apr 13, 2014
195 notes

Turn parking spaces into mini-cities?

Fully equipped with a kitchen, bathroom, and a flexible living space, the SCADPad could be the way to creatively reuse the parking lot—one of a city’s most wasteful uses of space.”

More: Fast Company.

4:41 pm - Fri, Mar 21, 2014
106 notes

At last, it’s wine o’clock again, which means it time to share an adult beverage-related repurposing find!

Today’s find, via Randy & Meg’s Garden Paradise, is bottle trees. (Or would you say they’re flowers?) 

Earlier posts in Unconsumption/s wine o’clock series can be found here; the bottle tree subset: here

7:24 am - Mon, Mar 10, 2014
377 notes
Cross-file under: ”Creative reuse of an old clamp” and “vertical storage.” 
(via Diagnosis: Interior Mania)

Cross-file under: ”Creative reuse of an old clamp” and “vertical storage.” 

(via Diagnosis: Interior Mania)

3:40 pm - Thu, Feb 20, 2014
20 notes

Create from a Crate 2013/14 Exhibition and Competition!

You can see view the finished pieces and prize winners at the forthcoming Exhibition.

More here: http://www.vwa.org.au/exhibitions/create-crate/

12:21 pm
101 notes

These furniture pieces are made from recycled milk jugs. Loll Design estimates that for every pound of chair they make, 8 milk jugs are recycled and put back into good use.

(via Loll Design: Furniture from Milk Jugs | IPPINKA)

These furniture pieces are made from recycled milk jugs. Loll Design estimates that for every pound of chair they make, 8 milk jugs are recycled and put back into good use.

(via Loll Design: Furniture from Milk Jugs | IPPINKA)

3:40 pm - Mon, Feb 17, 2014
106 notes

The Reborn cardboard sofa, by Seoul-based monocomplex design studio. It’s reborn because it was, quite simply, made out of 127 used cardboard boxes.

More: Refuse Repurposed: Reborn Cardboard Sofa by Monocomplex | The Beautifulist

The Reborn cardboard sofa, by Seoul-based monocomplex design studio. It’s reborn because it was, quite simply, made out of 127 used cardboard boxes.

More: Refuse Repurposed: Reborn Cardboard Sofa by Monocomplex | The Beautifulist

7:56 pm - Sun, Feb 16, 2014
63 notes

Dismayed by the California Department of Transportation’s plans to scrap the steel from the recently replaced eastern span of the Bay Bridge, Bay Area resident David Grieshaber is looking to turn a section of it into a three-story home that would include a loft for himself and his wife, a rental space for Airbnb guests, and public space for visitors.

More: Someone Wants to Build a Home from Old Bay Bridge Scraps - Architectural Craziness - Curbed National

Dismayed by the California Department of Transportation’s plans to scrap the steel from the recently replaced eastern span of the Bay Bridge, Bay Area resident David Grieshaber is looking to turn a section of it into a three-story home that would include a loft for himself and his wife, a rental space for Airbnb guests, and public space for visitors.

More: Someone Wants to Build a Home from Old Bay Bridge Scraps - Architectural Craziness - Curbed National

3:40 pm - Thu, Feb 13, 2014
53 notes

Unlike most architects, Jan Körbes spent two years living in a caravan.
“I wanted my own space,” said Körbes, who spends half his time traveling for work. Initially an experiment, such mobile living actually worked. But anyone who has lived in a caravan would know that there is a lack of space, and, er, privacy.
While an apartment might be a solution for most, Körbes was inspired to build a home from an old grain silo, which he found in the Netherlands and shipped to Germany. The home cost $20,000, and Körbes has been living in the silo with his 7-year-old daughter since July. 

 (via This German Architect Turned a Recycled Silo into a (Tiny) House | Motherboard)

Unlike most architects, Jan Körbes spent two years living in a caravan.

“I wanted my own space,” said Körbes, who spends half his time traveling for work. Initially an experiment, such mobile living actually worked. But anyone who has lived in a caravan would know that there is a lack of space, and, er, privacy.

While an apartment might be a solution for most, Körbes was inspired to build a home from an old grain silo, which he found in the Netherlands and shipped to Germany. The home cost $20,000, and Körbes has been living in the silo with his 7-year-old daughter since July.

 (via This German Architect Turned a Recycled Silo into a (Tiny) House | Motherboard)

3:40 pm - Tue, Feb 11, 2014
51 notes

The Fragment table was designed by Roberto Sironi, industrial designer from Milan, Italy. The project tries to investigate the aesthetic-expressive quality of briccole cut-outs.Briccole is a wooden  man-made marine structure that extends above the water level and is not connected to shore. They are used at ports and piers for various reasons, for example to provide a fixed point for ships, when all the pier length is already used. Sometimes they are used to carry useful information like speed limits, advertising or navigation aids. Briccole used in this project are old pieces of oak wood, that stayed over 10 years underwater, being eroded by water. This provided elements with particular, unique embroidery.

More:  Fragment table - wood brought back to life - dsgnrt - daily dose of inspiration! - find your inspiration! architecture, design and art daily!)
Via Reddit.

The Fragment table was designed by Roberto Sironi, industrial designer from Milan, Italy. The project tries to investigate the aesthetic-expressive quality of briccole cut-outs.

Briccole is a wooden  man-made marine structure that extends above the water level and is not connected to shore. They are used at ports and piers for various reasons, for example to provide a fixed point for ships, when all the pier length is already used. Sometimes they are used to carry useful information like speed limits, advertising or navigation aids.



image

Briccole used in this project are old pieces of oak wood, that stayed over 10 years underwater, being eroded by water. This provided elements with particular, unique embroidery.

More:  Fragment table - wood brought back to life - dsgnrt - daily dose of inspiration! - find your inspiration! architecture, design and art daily!)

Via Reddit.

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