Posts tagged reuse
8:03 am - Mon, Aug 25, 2014
5,335 notes
theonion:



Experts: “We can just keep using the chairs we have.”


"According to the report, chair production can cease entirely with no negative consequences for American consumers, as the many good chairs now on store shelves and available at garage sales are sufficient to satisfy the country’s seating requirements for the immediate future." 
Amusing. And a good reminder that so many existing items can be found in second-hand shops and/or in antique stores, listed on Craigslist, Freecycle, eBay, and even found in many of your friends’ homes and/or those of family members (“hi, Dad!”); so why would consumers need to buy newly made merchandise?!
Yeah, reuse! 

theonion:

"According to the report, chair production can cease entirely with no negative consequences for American consumers, as the many good chairs now on store shelves and available at garage sales are sufficient to satisfy the country’s seating requirements for the immediate future." 

Amusing. And a good reminder that so many existing items can be found in second-hand shops and/or in antique stores, listed on Craigslist, Freecycle, eBay, and even found in many of your friends’ homes and/or those of family members (“hi, Dad!”); so why would consumers need to buy newly made merchandise?!

Yeah, reuse! 

3:19 pm - Sat, Aug 16, 2014
252 notes
DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS
Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components: 
Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).
Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  
A full video about the winning project below.

DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS

Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components:

Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).

Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  

A full video about the winning project below.

12:20 pm - Tue, Aug 12, 2014
125 notes

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.
This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.

This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

12:20 pm - Mon, Aug 11, 2014
166 notes

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures.
His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors.
You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson.

(via A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf | Colossal)

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures.

His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors.

You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson.

(via A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf | Colossal)

1:26 pm - Fri, Aug 8, 2014
61 notes
This sounds like our kinda show:

Premiering Friday, August 8th at 10PM on Pivot TV, Human Resources is a new reality series about TerraCycle, an innovative company whose mission is to “eliminate the idea of waste.”
TerraCycle is one of the fastest growing green companies in the world, and they’ll take anything and everything that is landfill-bound — from potato chip bags to cigarette butts — and recycles, up-cycles, re-uses, or otherwise transforms these objects into something else.

Learned about this from The New York Times: 

“Garbage is my passion,” Tiffany Threadgould, a designer, says in the premiere. “My ring is an old spoon. My earrings are bike parts.”
The first episode involves pitching a coffee-table book on recycling to a publisher. The second is about the no-separation “zero-waste boxes” the company tries to sell to small businesses.


If you know Uncon, you know that Threadgould is one of my heroes: Her amazing contributions to our Uncollection project added up to one of my favorite moments for this entire project.
So I will be watching. Hope you will too. More here: Human Resources | Pivot.tv

This sounds like our kinda show:

Premiering Friday, August 8th at 10PM on Pivot TV, Human Resources is a new reality series about TerraCycle, an innovative company whose mission is to “eliminate the idea of waste.”

TerraCycle is one of the fastest growing green companies in the world, and they’ll take anything and everything that is landfill-bound — from potato chip bags to cigarette butts — and recycles, up-cycles, re-uses, or otherwise transforms these objects into something else.

Learned about this from The New York Times:

“Garbage is my passion,” Tiffany Threadgould, a designer, says in the premiere. “My ring is an old spoon. My earrings are bike parts.”

The first episode involves pitching a coffee-table book on recycling to a publisher. The second is about the no-separation “zero-waste boxes” the company tries to sell to small businesses.

If you know Uncon, you know that Threadgould is one of my heroes: Her amazing contributions to our Uncollection project added up to one of my favorite moments for this entire project.

So I will be watching. Hope you will too. More here: Human Resources | Pivot.tv

3:40 pm - Mon, Aug 4, 2014
143 notes




Radamés Figueroa, who goes by “Juni,” is an artist who set aside his brushes to live in the trees…. 
"Tree House–Casa Club" (2013) is the result of the artist’s collaborative efforts in the Naguabo forest, where he and his friends built a tree house from raw materials found by the artist in San Juan over the course of nine months, and from readily available materials in the forest, such as stones and water for cement mix. 
Figueroa grew up using what he calls “tropical readymades”—riffing on Duchamp’s found object art—by turning his shoes and footballs into planters. 




 More: Tree House Retreat Made of Repurposed Materials | Dwell

Radamés Figueroa, who goes by “Juni,” is an artist who set aside his brushes to live in the trees….

"Tree House–Casa Club" (2013) is the result of the artist’s collaborative efforts in the Naguabo forest, where he and his friends built a tree house from raw materials found by the artist in San Juan over the course of nine months, and from readily available materials in the forest, such as stones and water for cement mix. 

Figueroa grew up using what he calls “tropical readymades”—riffing on Duchamp’s found object art—by turning his shoes and footballs into planters. 

 More: Tree House Retreat Made of Repurposed Materials | Dwell

3:04 pm
144 notes

Lithuanian designer Ingrida Kazenaite has developed a conceptual pen that would mend damaged clothes by “printing” over rips and tears.
…
One end of the pen would scan the fabric to match the colour and texture, then the other end would spray the fibres onto the garment. Buttons on the case would allow the user to switch between the two functions.

(via Fabric Pen by Ingrida Kazenaite repairs clothes without stitching)

Lithuanian designer Ingrida Kazenaite has developed a conceptual pen that would mend damaged clothes by “printing” over rips and tears.

One end of the pen would scan the fabric to match the colour and texture, then the other end would spray the fibres onto the garment. Buttons on the case would allow the user to switch between the two functions.

(via Fabric Pen by Ingrida Kazenaite repairs clothes without stitching)

2:31 pm - Wed, Jul 30, 2014
86 notes

Bringing a twist to the idea of a bag for life, the RNLI has made a messenger bag out of decommissioned life jackets. The RNLI work tirelessly around the country saving the lives of those who get in trouble at sea, and summer is one of their most busy periods.  
All the life jackets used have been worn by the brave volunteers at the RNLI during real sea rescues. 

More: A Bag for Life » Sea to Sky Lifestyle

Bringing a twist to the idea of a bag for life, the RNLI has made a messenger bag out of decommissioned life jackets. The RNLI work tirelessly around the country saving the lives of those who get in trouble at sea, and summer is one of their most busy periods.  

All the life jackets used have been worn by the brave volunteers at the RNLI during real sea rescues. 

More: A Bag for Life » Sea to Sky Lifestyle

12:20 pm - Thu, Jul 24, 2014
51 notes
significobs:


if you have a second copy of something or an old book you know you’ll never flip through again, this neat little Photo Album DIY from Photojojo is worth putting on your crafts to-do list.
The basic idea is to ‘upcycle’ the book into a photo album by cutting out windows in select pages, taping those pages to the next page on three sides using double-sided tape, and then sliding your prints of choice into the newly-created slots.

More: DIY: Upcycle an Old Book Into a Neat Photo Album in a Few Easy Steps

significobs:

if you have a second copy of something or an old book you know you’ll never flip through again, this neat little Photo Album DIY from Photojojo is worth putting on your crafts to-do list.

The basic idea is to ‘upcycle’ the book into a photo album by cutting out windows in select pages, taping those pages to the next page on three sides using double-sided tape, and then sliding your prints of choice into the newly-created slots.

More: DIY: Upcycle an Old Book Into a Neat Photo Album in a Few Easy Steps

3:40 pm - Wed, Jul 23, 2014
70 notes

A conceptual design for a London skyscraper by Paris studio Chartier-Corbasson Architectes proposes using waste generated by workers already in the building to help construct new floors as demand grows.

More: Chartier-Corbasson Architectes’ Organic Skyscraper made from rubbish

A conceptual design for a London skyscraper by Paris studio Chartier-Corbasson Architectes proposes using waste generated by workers already in the building to help construct new floors as demand grows.

More: Chartier-Corbasson Architectes’ Organic Skyscraper made from rubbish

12:20 pm
55 notes

Waste. What is the value of waste? In Cape Town everything is re-used and re-used and re-used until it falls apart. In Cape Town nothing is waste. Everywhere, from townships to more well–to-do areas, we can find products made of used or re-used materials. …. 
Department of Design is a three weeks event, initiated by the Dutch consulate, with Christine de Baan as program director. What makes this official Dutch participation in Cape Town Design Capital 2014 so special, is that it is not a ‘business as usual’ presentation of design objects. But this initiative rather seeks collaboration with South Africa on topics such as energy, water, health, education and town planning.

Read more here: What is waste worth? - Renny Ramakers

Waste. What is the value of waste? In Cape Town everything is re-used and re-used and re-used until it falls apart. In Cape Town nothing is waste. Everywhere, from townships to more well–to-do areas, we can find products made of used or re-used materials. ….

Department of Design is a three weeks event, initiated by the Dutch consulate, with Christine de Baan as program director. What makes this official Dutch participation in Cape Town Design Capital 2014 so special, is that it is not a ‘business as usual’ presentation of design objects. But this initiative rather seeks collaboration with South Africa on topics such as energy, water, health, education and town planning.

Read more here: What is waste worth? - Renny Ramakers

5:21 pm - Tue, Jul 22, 2014
159 notes

A supermarket chain in the UK announced today that it’s going to power one of its stores entirely off food waste. It’s an attractive solution to two of the most gnawing sustainability concerns: waste and energy.
A Sainsbury’s in Cannock, a town in the West Midlands, will get all of its electricity from food waste through a process called anaerobic digestion. The process is pretty much what it sounds like: waste food is “digested” by microorganisms in huge tankers sealed off from the air, which Sainsbury’s compares to a human stomach.
Biffa, the waste management company working with the supermarket, explains that the waste is broken down into a slurry that degrades into an energy rich biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide. 

More: This British Supermarket Will Be Powered Entirely by Its Own Food Waste | Motherboard

A supermarket chain in the UK announced today that it’s going to power one of its stores entirely off food waste. It’s an attractive solution to two of the most gnawing sustainability concerns: waste and energy.

A Sainsbury’s in Cannock, a town in the West Midlands, will get all of its electricity from food waste through a process called anaerobic digestion. The process is pretty much what it sounds like: waste food is “digested” by microorganisms in huge tankers sealed off from the air, which Sainsbury’s compares to a human stomach.

Biffa, the waste management company working with the supermarket, explains that the waste is broken down into a slurry that degrades into an energy rich biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide.

More: This British Supermarket Will Be Powered Entirely by Its Own Food Waste | Motherboard

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