Posts tagged repurposing
12:20 pm - Thu, Mar 13, 2014
115 notes

procrastinaut:

How do you keep old electronics out of the trash? One answer is a simple hack: Stick a newer gadget inside an old shell. These classic Macs from the late 80s have been fitted with iPads inside, making them a hybrid of recycled Apple parts.

The project came about by chance when a Dutch designer stumbled on the old computers. “When I helped my buddy with moving last month, he was going to throw out his nerdy Macintosh SE from 1989,” recalls Fredo de Smet, a principal at a creative firm called Fisheye. “There were six of them, and I saved them from destruction.”

The company pulled out the old image tubes, and 3-D printed a frame to hold a 7-inch iPad inside. So far, they’ve used the hacked computers at a trade show and occasionally bring them to meetings, though De Smet notes the obvious: “The old Mac is not truly mobile.”

More here.

12:20 pm - Fri, Oct 4, 2013
218 notes

procrastinaut:

Sculptures made of phonebooks by Gemis Luciani.

(Fubiz)

9:26 am - Mon, Aug 12, 2013
471 notes

junkculture:

A House Built from Salvaged Materials Physically Transforms into an Open Air Theater:

Artist Matthew Mazzotta, the Coleman Center for the Arts, and the people of York, Alabama have teamed up to work together and transform a blighted property in York’s downtown into a new public art project in the shape of a house that can physically transform into a 100 seat open air theater, free for the public.
The project called “Open House” was developed using materials from the abandoned house as well as the land it sits on. The house opens up when the community wants to enjoy shows, plays, movies, and any other event people can think of that supports community life.
See more here
12:20 pm - Mon, Jul 1, 2013
243 notes

Say what you want about Domino’s (it’s an abomination unto the Lord), but they have one of the better branded Pinterest projects I’ve seen in a while—Second Hand Logos.
Since Domino’s recently redesigned their logo, Crispin Porter + Bogusky got to thinking about what happens to a company’s old signage, clothing, store materials, etc.
So, the agency commissioned 10 artists to make stuff with old Domino’s employee shirts, pizza boxes and other company ephemera. Lots of it is for sale, and Domino’s is being gracious enough not to demand a cut of the artists’ sales, which is pretty cool of them.

The waste fallout of pointless redesigns is sad. But, you have to give some credit for trying to make the most of it in this way. And to reiterate the writer’s point: nice that the repurposing artists don’t have to split any resulting profits. Give them a hand for making something worthwhile out of the needlessly rejected. 
More: Artists Give Old Domino’s Signage a Second Life in ‘Second Hand Logos’ Project | Adweek

Say what you want about Domino’s (it’s an abomination unto the Lord), but they have one of the better branded Pinterest projects I’ve seen in a while—Second Hand Logos.

Since Domino’s recently redesigned their logo, Crispin Porter + Bogusky got to thinking about what happens to a company’s old signage, clothing, store materials, etc.

So, the agency commissioned 10 artists to make stuff with old Domino’s employee shirts, pizza boxes and other company ephemera. Lots of it is for sale, and Domino’s is being gracious enough not to demand a cut of the artists’ sales, which is pretty cool of them.

The waste fallout of pointless redesigns is sad. But, you have to give some credit for trying to make the most of it in this way. And to reiterate the writer’s point: nice that the repurposing artists don’t have to split any resulting profits. Give them a hand for making something worthwhile out of the needlessly rejected.

More: Artists Give Old Domino’s Signage a Second Life in ‘Second Hand Logos’ Project | Adweek

4:40 pm - Mon, May 27, 2013
27 notes

A sustainability-minded competition challenged students at Parsons The New School for Design to transform Poltrona Frau‘s leather leftovers–freshly harvested from the floor of its factory in Tolentino, Italy–into luxe accessories and objects. Designer and Parsons faculty member Andrea Ruggiero led a group of 15 Parsons product design students in the seven-week project.
Jenny Hsu emerged on top with “Piqnique” (at left), a woven case for meals on the go that doubles as a leather placemat. Rounding out the top three were Yuna Kim‘s “Miovino” leather wine glass tags and the “Tuft” candle holders (at right) designed by Benjamin Billick.

More: Parsons Students Repurpose Luxe Leather Scraps for ‘Wasteless’ Competition - UnBeige

A sustainability-minded competition challenged students at Parsons The New School for Design to transform Poltrona Frau‘s leather leftovers–freshly harvested from the floor of its factory in Tolentino, Italy–into luxe accessories and objects. Designer and Parsons faculty member Andrea Ruggiero led a group of 15 Parsons product design students in the seven-week project.

Jenny Hsu emerged on top with “Piqnique” (at left), a woven case for meals on the go that doubles as a leather placemat. Rounding out the top three were Yuna Kim‘s “Miovino” leather wine glass tags and the “Tuft” candle holders (at right) designed by Benjamin Billick.

More: Parsons Students Repurpose Luxe Leather Scraps for ‘Wasteless’ Competition - UnBeige

2:38 pm - Tue, Jan 29, 2013
58 notes
Another DIY / repurposing idea that’s for the birds: 
Why not turn an old paint can or coffee can into a birdfeeder?
(Of course, it doesn’t have to be as elaborate as the examples pictured!)
For a brief tutorial, see this Lowe’s Creative Ideas post.

Another DIY / repurposing idea that’s for the birds:

Why not turn an old paint can or coffee can into a birdfeeder?

(Of course, it doesn’t have to be as elaborate as the examples pictured!)

For a brief tutorial, see this Lowe’s Creative Ideas post.

2:12 pm
313 notes
DIY / repurposing idea du jour:
Old boot screwed onto a tree or a fence = new bird house. 
For additional bird house, feeder, and other bird-related posts, browse through this subset of the Unconsumption archive.
[Photo spotted on Facebook here, thanks to friend Jim Mitchem. Source apparently is Livesay Photography. (Kudos to photographers who add watermarks to their photos!)] 

DIY / repurposing idea du jour:

Old boot screwed onto a tree or a fence = new bird house. 

For additional bird house, feeder, and other bird-related posts, browse through this subset of the Unconsumption archive.

[Photo spotted on Facebook here, thanks to friend Jim Mitchem. Source apparently is Livesay Photography. (Kudos to photographers who add watermarks to their photos!)] 

7:34 pm - Wed, Nov 14, 2012
380 notes
A fun gallery of repurposing inspiration: Creative Ways to Repurpose and Reuse Old Stuff » Design You Trust
9:23 am - Sat, Nov 10, 2012
187 notes
Love this simple holiday decorating / repurposing idea:
Fill a crate with jars, candles, and greenery and/or pine cones. 
(via Kaleidoscope of Colors)

Love this simple holiday decorating / repurposing idea:

Fill a crate with jars, candles, and greenery and/or pine cones. 

(via Kaleidoscope of Colors)

5:04 pm - Wed, Nov 7, 2012
64 notes

Nelson “Kio” Mukiika has a machine shop of sorts in the Kasese district of western Uganda. I say “of sorts” because he does not have access to basic measuring tools. Nevertheless, Mukiika is able to disassemble old bikes and re-weld them together into creations of his own design: Three-wheeled hand-powered bicycles. …
Mukiika can produce the trikes for about $170, well out of reach for the average Ugandan. (More than a third of the population live on a little over $1 a day.) The funding is provided by CanUgan. You can volunteer your time, form a support group, or make a donation to the organization here.

(via CanUgan x Mukiika: Turning Old Bicycles into Hand-Powered Trikes for the Disabled - Core77)

Nelson “Kio” Mukiika has a machine shop of sorts in the Kasese district of western Uganda. I say “of sorts” because he does not have access to basic measuring tools. Nevertheless, Mukiika is able to disassemble old bikes and re-weld them together into creations of his own design: Three-wheeled hand-powered bicycles. …

Mukiika can produce the trikes for about $170, well out of reach for the average Ugandan. (More than a third of the population live on a little over $1 a day.) The funding is provided by CanUgan. You can volunteer your time, form a support group, or make a donation to the organization here.

(via CanUgan x Mukiika: Turning Old Bicycles into Hand-Powered Trikes for the Disabled - Core77)

2:11 pm - Wed, Oct 10, 2012
34 notes

Pecas has created “Fase #3” using a new material called Demodé. It exploits and rescues wasted textile from factories in Santiago, Chile, before being used by the consumer.

via Fase #3 : Bernardita Marambio B.
You can get a sense of the underlying material process here.

Pecas has created “Fase #3” using a new material called Demodé. It exploits and rescues wasted textile from factories in Santiago, Chile, before being used by the consumer.

via Fase #3 : Bernardita Marambio B.

You can get a sense of the underlying material process here.

4:58 pm - Thu, Oct 4, 2012
56 notes

Since its start in 2005, Sea Bags has spawned a number of imitations, but unlike its competitors Sea Bags still uses only retired sails for its durable, handmade totes and accessories.
Now the Portland, Maine-based brand has partnered with fellow East Coast company, Woolrich, marrying its weathered nylon with the Pennsylvania heritage brand’s venerable wools to create a small collection of large tote bags, dopp kits and iPad cases in three plaid variations (Forest, Harvest and Lodge).
Totes come in various combinations of wool bodies with sail interiors and sail shells lined with wool, as well as a few styles comprising nylon blocked with leather on the outside and Woolrich plaid on the inside.
Like the repurposed sails, the Woolrich fabric and leather come from dead stock supply procured by Sea Bags, so it’s a limited edition in the truest sense—when they run out of scraps, the line is finished.

 (via Sea Bags and Woolrich)

Since its start in 2005, Sea Bags has spawned a number of imitations, but unlike its competitors Sea Bags still uses only retired sails for its durable, handmade totes and accessories.

Now the Portland, Maine-based brand has partnered with fellow East Coast company, Woolrich, marrying its weathered nylon with the Pennsylvania heritage brand’s venerable wools to create a small collection of large tote bags, dopp kits and iPad cases in three plaid variations (Forest, Harvest and Lodge).

Totes come in various combinations of wool bodies with sail interiors and sail shells lined with wool, as well as a few styles comprising nylon blocked with leather on the outside and Woolrich plaid on the inside.

Like the repurposed sails, the Woolrich fabric and leather come from dead stock supply procured by Sea Bags, so it’s a limited edition in the truest sense—when they run out of scraps, the line is finished.

 (via Sea Bags and Woolrich)

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