Posts tagged palletecture
1:50 pm - Thu, Feb 24, 2011
50 notes
From The $200 Microhouse - NYTimes.com:
Derek Diedricksen makes “playful micro-shelters out of junk” in the backyard of his home in Stoughton, Massachusetts.
"At about 24 square feet, the Gypsy Junker [pictured above], made primarily out of shipping pallets, castoff storm windows and a neighbor’s discarded kitchen cabinets, is the largest of Mr. Diedricksen’s backyard structures."
"Sawed-off yellow, blue and green wine bottle bottoms make for a colorful lower-level window in the guest area, and there is a heating unit with an exterior vent built from a frying-pan base, with a broken brass cymbal that serves as a heat reflector." The exterior counter is the side of an old front-loading washing machine. (He used the washing machine’s porthole-like window in another structure made from salvaged materials.)
"Mr. Diedricksen makes a living doing carpentry and spends a lot of time as Mr. Mom to his two young children, but he has also been a comic book writer, a D.J. and a home inspector, and is a drummer in a Rage Against the Machine tribute band called Age Against the Machine."
Read the rest of The New York Times story, and view a slideshow of Diedricksen’s various cabins, here.
His video of the Gypsy Junker is here.
Junkitecture. Palletecture. Charming.
(hat tip to Naomi Seldin, @SimplerLiving on Twitter)

From The $200 Microhouse - NYTimes.com:

Derek Diedricksen makes “playful micro-shelters out of junk” in the backyard of his home in Stoughton, Massachusetts.

"At about 24 square feet, the Gypsy Junker [pictured above], made primarily out of shipping pallets, castoff storm windows and a neighbor’s discarded kitchen cabinets, is the largest of Mr. Diedricksen’s backyard structures."

"Sawed-off yellow, blue and green wine bottle bottoms make for a colorful lower-level window in the guest area, and there is a heating unit with an exterior vent built from a frying-pan base, with a broken brass cymbal that serves as a heat reflector." The exterior counter is the side of an old front-loading washing machine. (He used the washing machine’s porthole-like window in another structure made from salvaged materials.)

"Mr. Diedricksen makes a living doing carpentry and spends a lot of time as Mr. Mom to his two young children, but he has also been a comic book writer, a D.J. and a home inspector, and is a drummer in a Rage Against the Machine tribute band called Age Against the Machine."

Read the rest of The New York Times story, and view a slideshow of Diedricksen’s various cabins, here.

His video of the Gypsy Junker is here.

Junkitecture. Palletecture. Charming.

(hat tip to Naomi Seldin, @SimplerLiving on Twitter)

12:51 pm - Sat, Dec 11, 2010
8 notes
In South Africa, designers Andreas Claus Schnetzer and Pils Gregor used wood pallets in building an affordable prototype home known as the “Slumtube.” Local natural materials, such as clay and straw, provide insulation.
(via Inhabitat)
Related: Earlier Unconsumption pallet-repurposing post here, with links to other pallet structures.

In South Africa, designers Andreas Claus Schnetzer and Pils Gregor used wood pallets in building an affordable prototype home known as the “Slumtube.” Local natural materials, such as clay and straw, provide insulation.

(via Inhabitat)

Related: Earlier Unconsumption pallet-repurposing post here, with links to other pallet structures.

3:51 pm - Sat, Nov 20, 2010
18 notes
Via repurposedgoods:

Another great take on using pallets to create a low cost shelter. I would love to see the plans OR create a DIY Guide for something like this. Side observation, their pallets look mighty clean which makes me wonder, were they ever used for the transportation of goods?
ohmyfurandwhiskers:

This shelter was designed for refugees in Kosovo, back in 2006.  Now it is being developed by i-beam design for use as inexpensive and efficient low-cost housing not only for  people displaced by natural disasters but also as a solution for  affordable pre-fab housing.  In most cases in a disaster relief effort,  many of the pallets will arrive as part of the transportation of food  and materials; so the basic materials are there already.  The shelters can be built by hand at a rate of 500-600 pallets per day. One transitional shelter  measuring 10’ x 20’ would take 80 pallets to build and cost  approximately $500.
As much as I would like to live in a yurt, I think this would be a fantastic idea too.

Via repurposedgoods:

Another great take on using pallets to create a low cost shelter. I would love to see the plans OR create a DIY Guide for something like this. Side observation, their pallets look mighty clean which makes me wonder, were they ever used for the transportation of goods?

ohmyfurandwhiskers:

This shelter was designed for refugees in Kosovo, back in 2006. Now it is being developed by i-beam design for use as inexpensive and efficient low-cost housing not only for people displaced by natural disasters but also as a solution for affordable pre-fab housing. In most cases in a disaster relief effort, many of the pallets will arrive as part of the transportation of food and materials; so the basic materials are there already. The shelters can be built by hand at a rate of 500-600 pallets per day. One transitional shelter measuring 10’ x 20’ would take 80 pallets to build and cost approximately $500.


As much as I would like to live in a yurt, I think this would be a fantastic idea too.

(via repurposedgoods)

3:19 pm - Tue, Sep 21, 2010
8 notes
Reused shipping containers + pallets = cargotecture + palletecture
One very cool (and environmentally thoughtful) residence
The Manifesto House in Chile by James & Mau and Infiniski | Design Milk
Related: Unconsumption posts about new uses for disused shipping containers and pallets.

Reused shipping containers + pallets = cargotecture + palletecture

One very cool (and environmentally thoughtful) residence

The Manifesto House in Chile by James & Mau and Infiniski | Design Milk

Related: Unconsumption posts about new uses for disused shipping containers and pallets.

4:17 pm - Thu, Aug 26, 2010
10 notes
A Theatre Made From Junk
"This project reverses the normal processes of our  economy.  Here we are turning waste into functional products. We take  something worthless and make something of worth out of it."
Via PSFK and TreeHugger
Related: The Guardian’s Jonathan Glancey’s take on “junkitecture”
Earlier post about Palettenpavillion

A Theatre Made From Junk

"This project reverses the normal processes of our economy. Here we are turning waste into functional products. We take something worthless and make something of worth out of it."

Via PSFK and TreeHugger

Related: The Guardian’s Jonathan Glancey’s take on “junkitecture”

Earlier post about Palettenpavillion

1:00 pm - Mon, Aug 23, 2010
8 notes
The Palettenpavillon by Matthias Loebermann is a structure made entirely from shipping pallets, ground anchors, and tie rods. Designed to be easily assembled and dismantled, and then entirely recycled at a later date, the resulting building is intended as a temporary meeting place. (via BLDGBLOG: Pallet House)

The Palettenpavillon by Matthias Loebermann is a structure made entirely from shipping pallets, ground anchors, and tie rods. Designed to be easily assembled and dismantled, and then entirely recycled at a later date, the resulting building is intended as a temporary meeting place. (via BLDGBLOG: Pallet House)

10:30 am - Fri, Mar 20, 2009
"a. ml and partners Pallets are cheap and ubiquitous, with over two billion in circulation around the world. Architects and designers have been having their way with them, building theaters, refugee housing , art and architecture. Matthias Loebermann and Partner built this pavilion for the World Ski Championships in 2005 with architecture students from the University of Biberach…built from 1300 pallets and 20 tie rods to hold it together.”
(more photos at treehugger)

"a. ml and partners Pallets are cheap and ubiquitous, with over two billion in circulation around the world. Architects and designers have been having their way with them, building theaters, refugee housing , art and architecture. Matthias Loebermann and Partner built this pavilion for the World Ski Championships in 2005 with architecture students from the University of Biberach…built from 1300 pallets and 20 tie rods to hold it together.”

(more photos at treehugger)

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