Posts tagged maps
9:17 am - Thu, Dec 22, 2011
1,343 notes
An easy (and fun) way to reuse old maps is to use them as gift wrap.
(Photo via a Wooden Bee Pinterest board.)

An easy (and fun) way to reuse old maps is to use them as gift wrap.

(Photo via a Wooden Bee Pinterest board.)

8:46 am
1,494 notes
DIY project: Fold old maps into origami globes.
Other sheets of paper, such as magazine, catalog, book, or old sheet music pages, also could be used.
For this project, 5” square pieces of maps were folded into globes, then strung on twine. If you’d prefer to leave your globes loose, you could display a bunch of them in bowls, or group them on trays and add other items to make centerpieces (great for travel-themed parties). What other uses could you find for them?
For the how-to-fold-‘em details — Robbi Lindeman’s excellent tutorial and photos — visit poppytalk’s blog.

For other map reuse ideas, check the Unconsumption map-post archive here.

DIY project: Fold old maps into origami globes.

Other sheets of paper, such as magazine, catalog, book, or old sheet music pages, also could be used.

For this project, 5” square pieces of maps were folded into globes, then strung on twine. If you’d prefer to leave your globes loose, you could display a bunch of them in bowls, or group them on trays and add other items to make centerpieces (great for travel-themed parties). What other uses could you find for them?

For the how-to-fold-‘em details — Robbi Lindeman’s excellent tutorial and photos — visit poppytalk’s blog.

For other map reuse ideas, check the Unconsumption map-post archive here.

1:24 pm - Tue, Dec 13, 2011
38 notes
DIY project du jour: Turn old globes into snowpeople.
For how-to details, head over to Emily Henderson’s blog.

DIY project du jour: Turn old globes into snowpeople.

For how-to details, head over to Emily Henderson’s blog.

8:24 am - Thu, Nov 3, 2011
115 notes
Artist Francisca Prieto turns old catalogs, books, maps, and other printed materials into works of art. She folds each page using origami techniques, then joins together the folded pieces.

Francisca provides the unique experience of being able to look at a book and all of its pages at once, yet unable to read any one page individually. A hidden narrative emerges in each work through the connections that Francisca makes both in terms of the folded structures she creates, and the conceptual connections of the images and text selected.

(via Design*Sponge)
See also: Other creative new uses for books and maps.

Artist Francisca Prieto turns old catalogs, books, maps, and other printed materials into works of art. She folds each page using origami techniques, then joins together the folded pieces.

Francisca provides the unique experience of being able to look at a book and all of its pages at once, yet unable to read any one page individually. A hidden narrative emerges in each work through the connections that Francisca makes both in terms of the folded structures she creates, and the conceptual connections of the images and text selected.

(via Design*Sponge)

See also: Other creative new uses for books and maps.

10:33 am - Mon, Oct 10, 2011
112 notes

Each [notebook] is one-of-a-kind, as the cover is a unique map from somewhere around the world. There’s 48 pages of 100% recycled paper (with rounded corners to prevent dog-earing, of course). 5.25″ wide x 8″ tall.

 Mapbook — ACCESSORIES — Better Living Through Design

Each [notebook] is one-of-a-kind, as the cover is a unique map from somewhere around the world. There’s 48 pages of 100% recycled paper (with rounded corners to prevent dog-earing, of course). 5.25″ wide x 8″ tall.

 Mapbook — ACCESSORIES — Better Living Through Design

9:01 am - Wed, Sep 21, 2011
29 notes

The project arises from two real common situations.
The first: in previous years, before iphone apps appeared, we were used to collect a lot of maps of cities and places we visited for journey or holidays. I love maps because they both represent the journey’s state of mind and the identity of places. For that reason I always want, when possible, to keep them under my eye at home but the number of walls at home are a finite number…
The second: it happens that an old inherited lampshade can be damaged after several years or can be too old style for our apartments. And so what to do with maps and lampshade?

Memory Lamp. Musa Boom designs a recycled lamp - Musa Boom’s Blog
Thanks: Maria Cristina Debenedetti

The project arises from two real common situations.

The first: in previous years, before iphone apps appeared, we were used to collect a lot of maps of cities and places we visited for journey or holidays. I love maps because they both represent the journey’s state of mind and the identity of places. For that reason I always want, when possible, to keep them under my eye at home but the number of walls at home are a finite number…

The second: it happens that an old inherited lampshade can be damaged after several years or can be too old style for our apartments. And so what to do with maps and lampshade?

Memory Lamp. Musa Boom designs a recycled lamp - Musa Boom’s Blog

Thanks: Maria Cristina Debenedetti

7:08 am - Sun, May 15, 2011
16 notes
Artist Creates Intricate Portraits Out of Old Maps

Artist Nikki Rosato creates intricate portraits by cutting away at old maps, leaving only the roads and rivers behind like a network of blood vessels. Rosato uses a Stanley knife to hand-cut away all of the landmasses between the roads and waterways, and then uses the delicate paper left to create portraits — some in 2-D and some sculptural pieces.
For her first map series — If You Were a Place, You’d Be … — she took photos of friends and asked them which place they felt best represented them or was important to them. She then used a map of that place to create a likeness of her subjects.
Rosato noted that because paper maps are rarely used any more, they are easy for her to acquire. “For my birthday this year, my mom surprised me with about 20 pounds of used road maps that she obtained from online sources such as eBay.”

(via Underwire - Wired.com)

Artist Creates Intricate Portraits Out of Old Maps

Artist Nikki Rosato creates intricate portraits by cutting away at old maps, leaving only the roads and rivers behind like a network of blood vessels. Rosato uses a Stanley knife to hand-cut away all of the landmasses between the roads and waterways, and then uses the delicate paper left to create portraits — some in 2-D and some sculptural pieces.

For her first map series — If You Were a Place, You’d Be … — she took photos of friends and asked them which place they felt best represented them or was important to them. She then used a map of that place to create a likeness of her subjects.

Rosato noted that because paper maps are rarely used any more, they are easy for her to acquire. “For my birthday this year, my mom surprised me with about 20 pounds of used road maps that she obtained from online sources such as eBay.”

(via Underwire - Wired.com)

5:21 am - Thu, Mar 17, 2011
10 notes
How about a reclaimed journey to Ireland on St Patricks Day?
via Weckner Design

How about a reclaimed journey to Ireland on St Patricks Day?

via Weckner Design

9:47 am - Mon, Dec 20, 2010
353 notes
Via szymon:


Matthew Cusick “paints” with maps

Via szymon:

Matthew Cusick “paints” with maps

3:38 pm - Fri, Dec 17, 2010
37 notes
If, like me, you’re enthusiastic about repurposing old maps, you’ll like this idea:
Make bows from maps or magazine pages. 
(Photo via How About Orange, which provides how-to info.)

If, like me, you’re enthusiastic about repurposing old maps, you’ll like this idea:

Make bows from maps or magazine pages.

(Photo via How About Orange, which provides how-to info.)

4:27 am
20 notes
File under “Why didn’t I think of that?”:
World BBQ grill, from www.goldenhen.com.au. 
See also: Golden Hen’s art installation known as “Eggo house" — made out of egg cartons.
(hat tip to Liane Rossler)

File under “Why didn’t I think of that?”:

World BBQ grill, from www.goldenhen.com.au

See also: Golden Hen’s art installation known as “Eggo house" — made out of egg cartons.

(hat tip to Liane Rossler)

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