Posts tagged lighting
10:07 am - Mon, Jul 9, 2012
75 notes
More musical instrument repurposing: Lighting.
(via Tommaso Guerra)
9:01 am - Sun, Jun 24, 2012
91 notes
Laz Ojalde turns aluminum cans into lighting.
(via MocoLoco)

Laz Ojalde turns aluminum cans into lighting.

(via MocoLoco)

12:21 pm - Fri, Jun 15, 2012
69 notes
Light artist Bill Culbert transforms discarded plastic bottles and other ordinary household objects into fantastic sculptural installations.
Culbert has been selected to represent New Zealand at the Venice Biennale in 2013.


(via Beautiful/Decay)

Light artist Bill Culbert transforms discarded plastic bottles and other ordinary household objects into fantastic sculptural installations.

Culbert has been selected to represent New Zealand at the Venice Biennale in 2013.

(via Beautiful/Decay)

11:23 am - Tue, Jun 5, 2012
69 notes
Here’s another new spin on old records: 
GIN Art & Design’s lamps made from vintage 45 rpm records. 
(via GIN Art & Design at ICFF)

Here’s another new spin on old records

GIN Art & Design’s lamps made from vintage 45 rpm records. 

(via GIN Art & Design at ICFF)

10:23 am - Wed, May 30, 2012
102 notes
DIY project du jour:
Use discarded books to refresh old lamps. (Thrift store or yard sale finds, perhaps?)
For a how-to/tutorial, see: ReadyMade: Literary Lamp.
Find other creative new uses for books here, and previous lighting-related posts here.

DIY project du jour:

Use discarded books to refresh old lamps. (Thrift store or yard sale finds, perhaps?)

For a how-to/tutorial, see: ReadyMade: Literary Lamp.

Find other creative new uses for books here, and previous lighting-related posts here.

9:05 pm - Mon, May 28, 2012
108 notes
For a rustic look: If you have an old galvanized metal tub, you could simply repurpose it as a lamp.
Lamps pictured are from Atelier Joya, a San Francisco-based “boutique event design and floral company” that makes the lights and other items, such as vintage shutter display pieces and lights made from lobster baskets, available for rent.  
(Spotted on Pinterest, on an aptly named “If it’s galvanized, I probably love it” board here.)

For a rustic look: If you have an old galvanized metal tub, you could simply repurpose it as a lamp.

Lamps pictured are from Atelier Joya, a San Francisco-based “boutique event design and floral company” that makes the lights and other items, such as vintage shutter display pieces and lights made from lobster baskets, available for rent.  

(Spotted on Pinterest, on an aptly named “If it’s galvanized, I probably love it” board here.)

12:39 pm - Wed, May 23, 2012
328 notes
starsforstreetlights:

(via How to Make a Lamp from Vintage Cameras)
9:41 am - Fri, May 18, 2012
117 notes
Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.
Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 
One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)


Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.

Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 

One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)

Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

8:43 am - Wed, May 16, 2012
119 notes
Designer Issey Miyake, who’s explored the use of recycled materials in clothing design, debuts a line of flat-pack lamps made from recycled plastic bottles:

IN-EI, a new line of lamps created by the fashion designer Issey Miyake for the Italian lighting company Artemide, includes table, floor, ceiling and pendant lights. The collection, which is made from recycled PET plastic bottles, can be stored flat and expanded into three-dimensional forms without the use of internal frames.

The lamps will be available in the U.S. this fall.
(via Artemide Bringing Miyake Lamp Line to United States - NYTimes.com)

Designer Issey Miyake, who’s explored the use of recycled materials in clothing design, debuts a line of flat-pack lamps made from recycled plastic bottles:

IN-EI, a new line of lamps created by the fashion designer Issey Miyake for the Italian lighting company Artemide, includes table, floor, ceiling and pendant lights. The collection, which is made from recycled PET plastic bottles, can be stored flat and expanded into three-dimensional forms without the use of internal frames.

The lamps will be available in the U.S. this fall.

(via Artemide Bringing Miyake Lamp Line to United States - NYTimes.com)

4:18 pm - Fri, May 11, 2012
154 notes
It’s wine o’clock (somewhere!) — which means it’s time to share a wine-related repurposing find …
Today, it’s a DIY project: Attach corks to the cover of an electric fan, to make a mobile or a lamp.
With the addition of a lamp cord set (mentioned previously here), such a creation could be used as a lighting fixture or “chandelier,” as maker Mox & Fodder says.
For tutorial, see Mox & Fodder’s post here.  
For earlier items in Unconsumption wine o’clock series of posts, check out the archive here.

It’s wine o’clock (somewhere!) — which means it’s time to share a wine-related repurposing find …

Today, it’s a DIY project: Attach corks to the cover of an electric fan, to make a mobile or a lamp.

With the addition of a lamp cord set (mentioned previously here), such a creation could be used as a lighting fixture or “chandelier,” as maker Mox & Fodder says.

For tutorial, see Mox & Fodder’s post here.  

For earlier items in Unconsumption wine o’clock series of posts, check out the archive here.

5:52 pm - Wed, May 2, 2012
37 notes
Paul Coudamy’s F-Light — ceiling lights made from salvaged Airbus windows.
How’d you like to work in an office outfitted with a set of these lights?!
See also: More airplane-related repurposing here.

Paul Coudamy’s F-Light — ceiling lights made from salvaged Airbus windows.

How’d you like to work in an office outfitted with a set of these lights?!

See also: More airplane-related repurposing here.

12:38 pm - Mon, Apr 30, 2012
318 notes
michellebrand:

Cascade
240 bottle bases are used to make this beautiful design…………………….

Now this is some beautiful handiwork. UK-based designer Michelle Brand cuts off the bottoms of plastic bottles, sands them, then connects them, turning them into works of art ranging from large-scale lights and room dividers to pieces of jewelry.

Detail photo via her site here. For additional information and photos, check out Michelle’s Tumblr here. 
See also:
Michelle’s work makes me think of this use of bottle bottoms.
Find earlier Unconsumption plastic-related posts here. 

michellebrand:

Cascade

240 bottle bases are used to make this beautiful design…………………….

Now this is some beautiful handiwork. UK-based designer Michelle Brand cuts off the bottoms of plastic bottles, sands them, then connects them, turning them into works of art ranging from large-scale lights and room dividers to pieces of jewelry.

Detail photo via her site here. For additional information and photos, check out Michelle’s Tumblr here

See also:

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