Posts tagged lighting
4:00 pm - Sun, Aug 12, 2012
134 notes
thingsrecycledusefully:

Recycled Coffee Filter Lamps
Designer Vilma Farrell recycles used coffee filters into one-of-a-kind lamps. Talk about one man’s trash being another man’s treasure! While some lamps are given the earth-toned patterns of the naturally stained coffee filters, others are given additional color with vegetables and spices. Check out Lampada’s
via:  urbanesquemagazine

We’ve highlighted a number of coffee-related items here in the past, but this is a rather good one.

thingsrecycledusefully:

Recycled Coffee Filter Lamps

Designer Vilma Farrell recycles used coffee filters into one-of-a-kind lamps. Talk about one man’s trash being another man’s treasure! While some lamps are given the earth-toned patterns of the naturally stained coffee filters, others are given additional color with vegetables and spices. Check out Lampada’s

via:  urbanesquemagazine

We’ve highlighted a number of coffee-related items here in the past, but this is a rather good one.

4:02 pm - Fri, Jul 27, 2012
302 notes
Whoa — now this looks like an Unconsumption-y chandelier. 
Fashioned from wine bottles and wine barrel parts.
(via Bewley’s Rerun Productions)
Happy wine o’clock (somewhere)! 

Whoa — now this looks like an Unconsumption-y chandelier.

Fashioned from wine bottles and wine barrel parts.

(via Bewley’s Rerun Productions)

Happy wine o’clock (somewhere)! 

10:21 am - Sat, Jul 14, 2012
94 notes
What’s not to like about Nadia Belalia’s lamps made from pieces of colanders and steamer baskets? 
(via Design*Sponge)
Seriously, if you like this, then check out previous posts on kitchen-related upcycling here, and various things repurposed as lighting here. Lots of reuse inspiration.

What’s not to like about Nadia Belalia’s lamps made from pieces of colanders and steamer baskets? 

(via Design*Sponge)

Seriously, if you like this, then check out previous posts on kitchen-related upcycling here, and various things repurposed as lighting here. Lots of reuse inspiration.

10:07 am - Mon, Jul 9, 2012
74 notes
More musical instrument repurposing: Lighting.
(via Tommaso Guerra)
9:01 am - Sun, Jun 24, 2012
91 notes
Laz Ojalde turns aluminum cans into lighting.
(via MocoLoco)

Laz Ojalde turns aluminum cans into lighting.

(via MocoLoco)

12:21 pm - Fri, Jun 15, 2012
70 notes
Light artist Bill Culbert transforms discarded plastic bottles and other ordinary household objects into fantastic sculptural installations.
Culbert has been selected to represent New Zealand at the Venice Biennale in 2013.


(via Beautiful/Decay)

Light artist Bill Culbert transforms discarded plastic bottles and other ordinary household objects into fantastic sculptural installations.

Culbert has been selected to represent New Zealand at the Venice Biennale in 2013.

(via Beautiful/Decay)

11:23 am - Tue, Jun 5, 2012
70 notes
Here’s another new spin on old records: 
GIN Art & Design’s lamps made from vintage 45 rpm records. 
(via GIN Art & Design at ICFF)

Here’s another new spin on old records

GIN Art & Design’s lamps made from vintage 45 rpm records. 

(via GIN Art & Design at ICFF)

10:23 am - Wed, May 30, 2012
101 notes
DIY project du jour:
Use discarded books to refresh old lamps. (Thrift store or yard sale finds, perhaps?)
For a how-to/tutorial, see: ReadyMade: Literary Lamp.
Find other creative new uses for books here, and previous lighting-related posts here.

DIY project du jour:

Use discarded books to refresh old lamps. (Thrift store or yard sale finds, perhaps?)

For a how-to/tutorial, see: ReadyMade: Literary Lamp.

Find other creative new uses for books here, and previous lighting-related posts here.

9:05 pm - Mon, May 28, 2012
108 notes
For a rustic look: If you have an old galvanized metal tub, you could simply repurpose it as a lamp.
Lamps pictured are from Atelier Joya, a San Francisco-based “boutique event design and floral company” that makes the lights and other items, such as vintage shutter display pieces and lights made from lobster baskets, available for rent.  
(Spotted on Pinterest, on an aptly named “If it’s galvanized, I probably love it” board here.)

For a rustic look: If you have an old galvanized metal tub, you could simply repurpose it as a lamp.

Lamps pictured are from Atelier Joya, a San Francisco-based “boutique event design and floral company” that makes the lights and other items, such as vintage shutter display pieces and lights made from lobster baskets, available for rent.  

(Spotted on Pinterest, on an aptly named “If it’s galvanized, I probably love it” board here.)

12:39 pm - Wed, May 23, 2012
329 notes
starsforstreetlights:

(via How to Make a Lamp from Vintage Cameras)
9:41 am - Fri, May 18, 2012
117 notes
Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.
Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 
One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)


Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.

Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 

One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)

Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

8:43 am - Wed, May 16, 2012
119 notes
Designer Issey Miyake, who’s explored the use of recycled materials in clothing design, debuts a line of flat-pack lamps made from recycled plastic bottles:

IN-EI, a new line of lamps created by the fashion designer Issey Miyake for the Italian lighting company Artemide, includes table, floor, ceiling and pendant lights. The collection, which is made from recycled PET plastic bottles, can be stored flat and expanded into three-dimensional forms without the use of internal frames.

The lamps will be available in the U.S. this fall.
(via Artemide Bringing Miyake Lamp Line to United States - NYTimes.com)

Designer Issey Miyake, who’s explored the use of recycled materials in clothing design, debuts a line of flat-pack lamps made from recycled plastic bottles:

IN-EI, a new line of lamps created by the fashion designer Issey Miyake for the Italian lighting company Artemide, includes table, floor, ceiling and pendant lights. The collection, which is made from recycled PET plastic bottles, can be stored flat and expanded into three-dimensional forms without the use of internal frames.

The lamps will be available in the U.S. this fall.

(via Artemide Bringing Miyake Lamp Line to United States - NYTimes.com)

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