Posts tagged fashion
3:24 pm - Wed, Apr 17, 2013
218 notes

I get a kick out of seeing creative new uses for those plastic clips that keep bags of bread closed. (We’ve highlighted some bread-tag reuse examples here.) 

Also, trashion — clothing made from items that many people would toss into a trash can or a recycling bin — not only makes many of us smile, but encourages us to consider our wardrobe options and choices.

That said, there’s this: Bread clips upcycled into a wedding dress. 

The bride, Australia resident and fashion designer Stephanie Watson, sewed onto cotton fabric some 10,000 bread bag clips she’d collected for 10+ years. Cost: $36.

The Geelong Advertiser says this:

Ms Watson said she started collecting bread tags a decade ago at 19, and joked that when there were enough tags to cover a wedding dress, she and Mr Wapling would get married.

"We started living together in Geelong and there was a pile of bread tags on the window sill which we just kept adding to," Ms Watson said.

"It was just a joke at the beginning, but then people heard about the idea and they started collecting for us and giving us bread tags. "I was getting so many, I had to keep getting bigger and bigger jars.

A cousin (who’s a baker) donated a roll of tags (presumably new ones, but still) to help Stephanie complete the dress. 

(spotted on TreeHugger)

1:30 pm - Mon, Apr 1, 2013
486 notes
We’ve spotted an example of seat cushions upholstered with old belts, and have seen old suits turned into tote bags (here and here), and, now, there’s this:
Suits used as upholstery.
(photo via Good Ideas For You)
What do you think of this upcycling example?

We’ve spotted an example of seat cushions upholstered with old belts, and have seen old suits turned into tote bags (here and here), and, now, there’s this:

Suits used as upholstery.

(photo via Good Ideas For You)

What do you think of this upcycling example?

8:04 am - Thu, Mar 21, 2013
106 notes
New Mexico-based artist and environmental educator Nancy Judd uses fashion to engage people in environmental issues.
Nancy’s “Recycle Runway” couture fashion sculptures made from trash include a “faux fur” coat — old cassette tapes woven into the fabric of a thrift store coat. Discarded video tape accents the coat’s collar and cuffs, and material from a thrift store dress was used inside as lining.
Nancy’s “junk mail dress” was one of the first items we featured on Unconsumption (back in 2009!). It’s here.
(Photo by Sandrine Hahn, via Recycle Runway)
See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on new uses for cassettes here.

New Mexico-based artist and environmental educator Nancy Judd uses fashion to engage people in environmental issues.

Nancy’s “Recycle Runway” couture fashion sculptures made from trash include a “faux fur” coat — old cassette tapes woven into the fabric of a thrift store coat. Discarded video tape accents the coat’s collar and cuffs, and material from a thrift store dress was used inside as lining.

Nancy’s “junk mail dress” was one of the first items we featured on Unconsumption (back in 2009!). It’s here.

(Photo by Sandrine Hahn, via Recycle Runway)

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on new uses for cassettes here.

1:23 pm - Wed, Mar 20, 2013
367 notes
Lindsay Pemberton ”rescues” vintage tea cups from secondhand stores and upcycles them into cute bangles. She even puts cups’ handles and bottoms, which often sport makers’ marks, to good use: They get made into pendants and brooches/pins, respectively.
(Spotted on Pinterest — from The Life of Miss Elly blog | Rarg.co.nz)
See also: Earlier Unconsumption post on turning pieces of broken china into key rings.

Lindsay Pemberton ”rescues” vintage tea cups from secondhand stores and upcycles them into cute bangles. She even puts cups’ handles and bottoms, which often sport makers’ marks, to good use: They get made into pendants and brooches/pins, respectively.

(Spotted on Pinterest — from The Life of Miss Elly blog | Rarg.co.nz)

See also: Earlier Unconsumption post on turning pieces of broken china into key rings.

3:18 pm - Fri, Mar 15, 2013
2,017 notes
societycottontail:

newspaper dress = amazing.

Today’s trashion inspiration. 

societycottontail:

newspaper dress = amazing.

Today’s trashion inspiration. 

(Source: osseous-matter, via fuckyeahbookarts)

8:34 am - Mon, Mar 11, 2013
92 notes

Amy Twigger Holroyd approaches fashion with sharing in mind. In one project, she created garments that could be shared by friends with different body types. By making clothes that don’t constrict in places where people vary the most, a size six could potentially share her sweater with a size 16. 

But Holroyd’s projects go beyond one-size-fits-all couture. Her PhD research on “fashion as a commons” is an exploration of how to democratize and disrupt the clothing industry. “If you’re not able to make, you’re dependent on buying,” she says. “And if you’re dependent on buying, you’re dependent on what those people [in the fashion industry] have chosen — the quality of it, the design of it, the aesthetic of it.”

And so, under the umbrella label Keep & Share, she teaches folks how to fix and knit their own clothing, creates and sells long-lasting, sharable clothing, and hacks into cheap knitwear to send a message about the industry.

An interesting, slow-fashion, collaborative consumption-type of idea, for sure.

9:22 am - Wed, Feb 27, 2013
208 notes
Don’t Buy Those Expensive Jeans — Lease Them Instead

A new program in the Netherlands helps you eliminate wasteful spending on clothes. Instead of owning a pair of jeans for life, you can now just keep them for a year before you send them back to be recycled so you can try something new. 
Companies normally use a leasing model for durable goods, such as cars or heavy machinery. But Dutch entrepreneur Bert van Son thinks it could have a role for other products, too—like jeans. 
A few weeks ago, Van Son, who owns a small line called Mud Jeans, launched a new service allowing people to rent, rather than buy, his products. He figured that he might not make much money up-front. But it might allow him to gather valuable fabric after use, and perhaps cement loyalty with his customers.

More: Fast Company Co.Exist

Don’t Buy Those Expensive Jeans — Lease Them Instead

A new program in the Netherlands helps you eliminate wasteful spending on clothes. Instead of owning a pair of jeans for life, you can now just keep them for a year before you send them back to be recycled so you can try something new. 

Companies normally use a leasing model for durable goods, such as cars or heavy machinery. But Dutch entrepreneur Bert van Son thinks it could have a role for other products, too—like jeans.

A few weeks ago, Van Son, who owns a small line called Mud Jeans, launched a new service allowing people to rent, rather than buy, his products. He figured that he might not make much money up-front. But it might allow him to gather valuable fabric after use, and perhaps cement loyalty with his customers.

More: Fast Company Co.Exist

10:03 pm - Mon, Feb 25, 2013
484 notes
Repurposed cardboard, y’all.
See also: The prom dress a high school student made from cardboard and paper bags and her previous year’s prom dress made from soda pop tabs. 
Additional proof that you can make clothes from, well, just about anything? Check out these items made from Golden books, book pages, computer wires, shirt collars, t-shirts, dry cleaner bags, a parachute, bicycle tire inner tubes, Starburst candy wrappers, plastic shower curtains, and a FEMA tarp. Whew!
(Cardboard dress photo via Strode College. I doubt that a wearer could sit down in this dress, but still, cool repurposing!)

Repurposed cardboard, y’all.

See also: The prom dress a high school student made from cardboard and paper bags and her previous year’s prom dress made from soda pop tabs

Additional proof that you can make clothes from, well, just about anything? Check out these items made from Golden books, book pages, computer wiresshirt collarst-shirtsdry cleaner bags, a parachute, bicycle tire inner tubesStarburst candy wrappers, plastic shower curtains, and a FEMA tarp. Whew!

(Cardboard dress photo via Strode College. I doubt that a wearer could sit down in this dress, but still, cool repurposing!)

8:07 am - Tue, Feb 12, 2013
147 notes

Latex (kitchen/cleaning) gloves turned into jewelry, by Min-Ji Cho.

(spotted on comeunagazzaladra)

Another example — a glove-necklace made by Margherita Marchioni — can be found here

9:43 am - Wed, Feb 6, 2013
403 notes

Momo Wang’s Third-Hand UpCycle Collection is a brilliantly colorful example of what can be achieved with reusing found materials in fashion. Inspired by the “third hand” idea of French philosopher Derrida, Wang told Texprint of the 12-piece collection, “They were all made in my hometown Jinzhou in China. I bought all the clothes and materials from local second-hand markets there. The market is very cool.”
…
Wang finds upcycling to be a creative challenge: “The basic idea is to do what I can to refresh, renew, re-animate precious second-hand materials, and eventually deliver the beauty in them by my realization, and eventually have more and more people doing the same, or at least thinking similarly,” she says.

(via Momo Wang’s Third Hand Upcycled Collection: Inspired by Derrida · Eco-Chick)

Momo Wang’s Third-Hand UpCycle Collection is a brilliantly colorful example of what can be achieved with reusing found materials in fashion. Inspired by the “third hand” idea of French philosopher Derrida, Wang told Texprint of the 12-piece collection, “They were all made in my hometown Jinzhou in China. I bought all the clothes and materials from local second-hand markets there. The market is very cool.”

Wang finds upcycling to be a creative challenge: “The basic idea is to do what I can to refresh, renew, re-animate precious second-hand materials, and eventually deliver the beauty in them by my realization, and eventually have more and more people doing the same, or at least thinking similarly,” she says.

(via Momo Wang’s Third Hand Upcycled Collection: Inspired by Derrida · Eco-Chick)

6:22 pm - Sat, Dec 8, 2012
203 notes

H&M to encourage shoppers to recycle unwanted clothes … while rewarding them with discounts on purchases of new clothing?
From the Los Angeles Times: 








Fast fashion retailer H&M wants your old clothes. 
The Swedish clothier is rolling out a global initiative to encourage its shoppers to recycle unwanted outfits instead of throwing them in the trash, H&M said in a statement Thursday. 
"Every year, tons of textiles are thrown out with domestic waste and end up in landfill. As much as 95% of these clothes could be used again; re-worn, reused or recycled — depending on the state of the garment," H&M said. 
H&M will accept clothing from any brand in any condition (now might be a good time to bring out the stained sweatshirts and dozens of cotton T-shirts). In return, the retailer will give shoppers vouchers for future H&M purchases (thereby providing fodder for future recycling trips). All H&M stores will start accepting used clothing in February. 
This may help the retail giant to counter criticism that the rise of H&M and other fast fashion retailers such as Forever 21 has fueled shoppers, especially young ones, to treat clothing as disposable goods that can be chucked after wearing an outfit two or three times. 
H&M is partnering with recycling company I:Collect, which will take the clothes to a sorting facility in Germany. There, the clothes will either be separated for re-use as apparel or sent on its way for a second life as rags, stuffing, padding and other purposes. 
The retailer said its long-term goal is to “reduce the environmental impact of garments throughout the lifecycle.”









More in H&M’s press release here. 
[Side note: Many of you might recall that H&M came under fire a couple of years ago for destroying and discarding unworn/unsold clothing.]
Related: Earlier this year, UK retailer Marks & Spencer launched a recycled clothing initiative, a.k.a. “shwopping,” meant to reduce the amount of clothing going to landfill. Items — any brands’ merchandise — dropped in M&S in-store drop boxes either get resold through Oxfam, or are repurposed or recycled. M&S recently announced the program will expand beyond its stores: clothing collection boxes will be available at some workplaces. M&S gives customers vouchers redeemable for discounts on future purchases.   
Also: Clothing manufacturer Patagonia also accepts worn clothing — its own products — and provides drop boxes in stores. Through the company’s “Common Threads” program, some used Patagonia merchandise can be resold via eBay; items that are no longer wearable are recycled or repurposed.
What do you think about such clothing-collection initiatives? As a part of these programs, should customers be offered incentives, e.g., vouchers, to buy new clothes, or should they even be offered anything in return for their participation?  

H&M to encourage shoppers to recycle unwanted clothes … while rewarding them with discounts on purchases of new clothing?

From the Los Angeles Times

Fast fashion retailer H&M wants your old clothes. 

The Swedish clothier is rolling out a global initiative to encourage its shoppers to recycle unwanted outfits instead of throwing them in the trash, H&M said in a statement Thursday. 

"Every year, tons of textiles are thrown out with domestic waste and end up in landfill. As much as 95% of these clothes could be used again; re-worn, reused or recycled — depending on the state of the garment," H&M said. 

H&M will accept clothing from any brand in any condition (now might be a good time to bring out the stained sweatshirts and dozens of cotton T-shirts). In return, the retailer will give shoppers vouchers for future H&M purchases (thereby providing fodder for future recycling trips). All H&M stores will start accepting used clothing in February. 

This may help the retail giant to counter criticism that the rise of H&M and other fast fashion retailers such as Forever 21 has fueled shoppers, especially young ones, to treat clothing as disposable goods that can be chucked after wearing an outfit two or three times. 

H&M is partnering with recycling company I:Collect, which will take the clothes to a sorting facility in Germany. There, the clothes will either be separated for re-use as apparel or sent on its way for a second life as rags, stuffing, padding and other purposes. 

The retailer said its long-term goal is to “reduce the environmental impact of garments throughout the lifecycle.”

More in H&M’s press release here

[Side note: Many of you might recall that H&M came under fire a couple of years ago for destroying and discarding unworn/unsold clothing.]

Related: Earlier this year, UK retailer Marks & Spencer launched a recycled clothing initiative, a.k.a. “shwopping,” meant to reduce the amount of clothing going to landfill. Items — any brands’ merchandise — dropped in M&S in-store drop boxes either get resold through Oxfam, or are repurposed or recycled. M&S recently announced the program will expand beyond its stores: clothing collection boxes will be available at some workplaces. M&S gives customers vouchers redeemable for discounts on future purchases.   

Also: Clothing manufacturer Patagonia also accepts worn clothing — its own products — and provides drop boxes in stores. Through the company’s “Common Threads” program, some used Patagonia merchandise can be resold via eBay; items that are no longer wearable are recycled or repurposed.

What do you think about such clothing-collection initiatives? As a part of these programs, should customers be offered incentives, e.g., vouchers, to buy new clothes, or should they even be offered anything in return for their participation?  

10:43 am - Sat, Nov 17, 2012
4 notes

A while back, we tapped into discussion about “derelict chic” in this post. The underlying issue — precisely how do ideas around reuse relate to ideas around uniqueness or even “luxury” — comes up again via this recent article:

How much would you pay for a handbag made from truck tarpaulins and bottle caps?

Ilaria Venturini Fendi’s “dragon” bags, stitched together from reclaimed wood, PVC, vintage drawer pulls and fabric and leather remnants, sell for as much as $2,200. Her bracelets made from rubber toy tires—inscribed “Before Toy Tyre Now Bracelet”—sell for $320.

What do you think?

More: Carmina Campus: A Fendi Scion Makes Trash Into Handbags - WSJ.com

Earlier Unconsumption mention of Fendi’s work here

Install Headline