Posts tagged design
3:40 pm - Wed, Aug 20, 2014
226 notes

Bionic Yarns [is] a New York City-based startup that makes fabric from recycled ocean plastic, and next month, the company is launching its biggest collaboration to date with designer clothing company G-Star RAW.
The “RAW for the Oceans line” includes a range of denim products that, all told, are woven with some nine tons of ocean plastic inside. It’s a tiny fraction of the pollution problem, but you have to start somewhere.

More: How a Pair of Jeans Could Save Our Plastic-Choked Oceans | Business | WIRED

Bionic Yarns [is] a New York City-based startup that makes fabric from recycled ocean plastic, and next month, the company is launching its biggest collaboration to date with designer clothing company G-Star RAW.

The “RAW for the Oceans line” includes a range of denim products that, all told, are woven with some nine tons of ocean plastic inside. It’s a tiny fraction of the pollution problem, but you have to start somewhere.

More: How a Pair of Jeans Could Save Our Plastic-Choked Oceans | Business | WIRED

12:20 pm
243 notes

junkculture:

Campaign Aims to Turn Abandoned Bicycles’ Saddles into Outdoor Planters

Nuff said!

9:16 am - Tue, Aug 19, 2014
128 notes
How Do You Feel About Being Turned Into Compost When You Die? | Co.Exist | ideas impact:

Even when we’re dead, most Americans keep adding to our carbon footprints. Can the rituals around death be redesigned to become more sustainable?
With her Urban Death Project, designer Katrina Spade has been working on a greener alternative for the last three years. Along with the environmental issues, the design also considers the problem of space—cemeteries in the U.S. take up about a million acres of land, and as populations grow, even more space is needed. Spade wanted to find an answer that would allow people to be buried in cities.
The design uses composting to turn bodies into soil-building material for nearby farms and community gardens, so people literally become part of the city they once lived in. A four-story building, which Spade envisions being built in neighborhoods across a city, would serve both as composter and a place for ritual, where family members could see the deceased person for the last time. The composting process would take about two years.

More here.

How Do You Feel About Being Turned Into Compost When You Die? | Co.Exist | ideas impact:

Even when we’re dead, most Americans keep adding to our carbon footprints. Can the rituals around death be redesigned to become more sustainable?

With her Urban Death Project, designer Katrina Spade has been working on a greener alternative for the last three years. Along with the environmental issues, the design also considers the problem of space—cemeteries in the U.S. take up about a million acres of land, and as populations grow, even more space is needed. Spade wanted to find an answer that would allow people to be buried in cities.

The design uses composting to turn bodies into soil-building material for nearby farms and community gardens, so people literally become part of the city they once lived in. A four-story building, which Spade envisions being built in neighborhoods across a city, would serve both as composter and a place for ritual, where family members could see the deceased person for the last time. The composting process would take about two years.

More here.

3:19 pm - Sat, Aug 16, 2014
254 notes
DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS
Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components: 
Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).
Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  
A full video about the winning project below.

DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS

Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components:

Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).

Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  

A full video about the winning project below.

12:20 pm - Tue, Aug 12, 2014
125 notes

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.
This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.

This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

12:20 pm - Sun, Aug 10, 2014
105 notes
This may be the ultimate unconsumption challenge: Can something useful be done with the reported “5.6 trillion used cigarettes,” or filters from smoked cigarettes, more properly, that smokers discard annually? That’s said to add up to 766,571 metric tons of waste material
Motherboard reports that “a group of South Korean scientists recently published a study that proposes a one-step process to turn nasty ol’ flicked butts into something useful—like coating the electrodes of supercapacitors.”

The team from Seoul National University sees, if not beauty in trash, then at least some utility. They found that the cellulose acetate fibers that cigarette filters are made of could be turned into a carbon-based coating for the electrochemical components of supercapacitors.
[These] store extremely large amounts of electrical energy for things like backing up batteries, handling the fluctuating demands of laptops, storing the regenerative electrical power from electric cars’ brakes—all sorts of stuff.

Read more about it here: The Quest To Turn Littered Cigarette Butts into Something Useful | Motherboard
Popular Science has a writeup about this, too. “Here’s how the scientists described the process:” 


Used cigarette filters are composed largely of cellulose acetate. They are disposable, non-biodegradable, toxic and are a threat to the environment after usage. However, it has been reported that cellulose acetate can be directly utilized in the production of carbon materials containing a meso-/micropore structure by only a carbonization process [14]. That is, used cigarette filters could be used as a proper carbon source for supercapacitors. Importantly, carbonizing used cigarette filters in a nitrogen-containing atmosphere could provide the nitrogen doping on the carbon structure with the formation of such unique pore structures in a one-step process.

This may be the ultimate unconsumption challenge: Can something useful be done with the reported “5.6 trillion used cigarettes,” or filters from smoked cigarettes, more properly, that smokers discard annually? That’s said to add up to 766,571 metric tons of waste material

Motherboard reports that “a group of South Korean scientists recently published a study that proposes a one-step process to turn nasty ol’ flicked butts into something useful—like coating the electrodes of supercapacitors.”

The team from Seoul National University sees, if not beauty in trash, then at least some utility. They found that the cellulose acetate fibers that cigarette filters are made of could be turned into a carbon-based coating for the electrochemical components of supercapacitors.

[These] store extremely large amounts of electrical energy for things like backing up batteries, handling the fluctuating demands of laptops, storing the regenerative electrical power from electric cars’ brakes—all sorts of stuff.

Read more about it here: The Quest To Turn Littered Cigarette Butts into Something Useful | Motherboard

Popular Science has a writeup about this, too. “Here’s how the scientists described the process:”

Used cigarette filters are composed largely of cellulose acetate. They are disposable, non-biodegradable, toxic and are a threat to the environment after usage. However, it has been reported that cellulose acetate can be directly utilized in the production of carbon materials containing a meso-/micropore structure by only a carbonization process [14]. That is, used cigarette filters could be used as a proper carbon source for supercapacitors. Importantly, carbonizing used cigarette filters in a nitrogen-containing atmosphere could provide the nitrogen doping on the carbon structure with the formation of such unique pore structures in a one-step process.

1:26 pm - Fri, Aug 8, 2014
61 notes
This sounds like our kinda show:

Premiering Friday, August 8th at 10PM on Pivot TV, Human Resources is a new reality series about TerraCycle, an innovative company whose mission is to “eliminate the idea of waste.”
TerraCycle is one of the fastest growing green companies in the world, and they’ll take anything and everything that is landfill-bound — from potato chip bags to cigarette butts — and recycles, up-cycles, re-uses, or otherwise transforms these objects into something else.

Learned about this from The New York Times: 

“Garbage is my passion,” Tiffany Threadgould, a designer, says in the premiere. “My ring is an old spoon. My earrings are bike parts.”
The first episode involves pitching a coffee-table book on recycling to a publisher. The second is about the no-separation “zero-waste boxes” the company tries to sell to small businesses.


If you know Uncon, you know that Threadgould is one of my heroes: Her amazing contributions to our Uncollection project added up to one of my favorite moments for this entire project.
So I will be watching. Hope you will too. More here: Human Resources | Pivot.tv

This sounds like our kinda show:

Premiering Friday, August 8th at 10PM on Pivot TV, Human Resources is a new reality series about TerraCycle, an innovative company whose mission is to “eliminate the idea of waste.”

TerraCycle is one of the fastest growing green companies in the world, and they’ll take anything and everything that is landfill-bound — from potato chip bags to cigarette butts — and recycles, up-cycles, re-uses, or otherwise transforms these objects into something else.

Learned about this from The New York Times:

“Garbage is my passion,” Tiffany Threadgould, a designer, says in the premiere. “My ring is an old spoon. My earrings are bike parts.”

The first episode involves pitching a coffee-table book on recycling to a publisher. The second is about the no-separation “zero-waste boxes” the company tries to sell to small businesses.

If you know Uncon, you know that Threadgould is one of my heroes: Her amazing contributions to our Uncollection project added up to one of my favorite moments for this entire project.

So I will be watching. Hope you will too. More here: Human Resources | Pivot.tv

3:40 pm - Mon, Aug 4, 2014
148 notes




Radamés Figueroa, who goes by “Juni,” is an artist who set aside his brushes to live in the trees…. 
"Tree House–Casa Club" (2013) is the result of the artist’s collaborative efforts in the Naguabo forest, where he and his friends built a tree house from raw materials found by the artist in San Juan over the course of nine months, and from readily available materials in the forest, such as stones and water for cement mix. 
Figueroa grew up using what he calls “tropical readymades”—riffing on Duchamp’s found object art—by turning his shoes and footballs into planters. 




 More: Tree House Retreat Made of Repurposed Materials | Dwell

Radamés Figueroa, who goes by “Juni,” is an artist who set aside his brushes to live in the trees….

"Tree House–Casa Club" (2013) is the result of the artist’s collaborative efforts in the Naguabo forest, where he and his friends built a tree house from raw materials found by the artist in San Juan over the course of nine months, and from readily available materials in the forest, such as stones and water for cement mix. 

Figueroa grew up using what he calls “tropical readymades”—riffing on Duchamp’s found object art—by turning his shoes and footballs into planters. 

 More: Tree House Retreat Made of Repurposed Materials | Dwell

3:04 pm
145 notes

Lithuanian designer Ingrida Kazenaite has developed a conceptual pen that would mend damaged clothes by “printing” over rips and tears.
…
One end of the pen would scan the fabric to match the colour and texture, then the other end would spray the fibres onto the garment. Buttons on the case would allow the user to switch between the two functions.

(via Fabric Pen by Ingrida Kazenaite repairs clothes without stitching)

Lithuanian designer Ingrida Kazenaite has developed a conceptual pen that would mend damaged clothes by “printing” over rips and tears.

One end of the pen would scan the fabric to match the colour and texture, then the other end would spray the fibres onto the garment. Buttons on the case would allow the user to switch between the two functions.

(via Fabric Pen by Ingrida Kazenaite repairs clothes without stitching)

2:39 pm - Wed, Jul 30, 2014
35 notes

Creative Carbon Scotland offers tools like the Green Arts Portal, an online system available for creative organizations to track their carbon footprint, as well as the Green Arts Initiative, a simple sustainability accreditation system provided to companies, offices, individuals and venues operating within the cultural sector.
The organization also hosts workshops, provides advice, and has a firm commitment to furthering research in the field of arts sustainability. For this year’s Edinburgh Art Festival, Creative Carbon Scotland will be monitoring the carbon implications of the festival’s major exhibition Where do I end and you begin.  …  Data will be collected on the logistics of exhibition production, such as the travel and transportation of artworks and people, as well as the materials and energy used in the installation and running of the exhibition. 

More: Creative Carbon Scotland seeks to inspire connections between sustainability and the arts - SciArt in America

Creative Carbon Scotland offers tools like the Green Arts Portal, an online system available for creative organizations to track their carbon footprint, as well as the Green Arts Initiative, a simple sustainability accreditation system provided to companies, offices, individuals and venues operating within the cultural sector.

The organization also hosts workshops, provides advice, and has a firm commitment to furthering research in the field of arts sustainability.

For this year’s Edinburgh Art Festival, Creative Carbon Scotland will be monitoring the carbon implications of the festival’s major exhibition Where do I end and you begin.  …  Data will be collected on the logistics of exhibition production, such as the travel and transportation of artworks and people, as well as the materials and energy used in the installation and running of the exhibition. 

More: Creative Carbon Scotland seeks to inspire connections between sustainability and the arts - SciArt in America

2:31 pm
86 notes

Bringing a twist to the idea of a bag for life, the RNLI has made a messenger bag out of decommissioned life jackets. The RNLI work tirelessly around the country saving the lives of those who get in trouble at sea, and summer is one of their most busy periods.  
All the life jackets used have been worn by the brave volunteers at the RNLI during real sea rescues. 

More: A Bag for Life » Sea to Sky Lifestyle

Bringing a twist to the idea of a bag for life, the RNLI has made a messenger bag out of decommissioned life jackets. The RNLI work tirelessly around the country saving the lives of those who get in trouble at sea, and summer is one of their most busy periods.  

All the life jackets used have been worn by the brave volunteers at the RNLI during real sea rescues. 

More: A Bag for Life » Sea to Sky Lifestyle

3:51 pm - Fri, Jul 25, 2014
64 notes
Cool idea — and of course reminds me of The Uncollection! Love the idea of remixing what you own to replace logos, whether ours or something else!

Logo Removal Service takes discarded gimme shirts bedecked with sponsor logos, and carefully patches over them with new fabric, transforming them into amazing and abstract new one-of-a-kind garments.
They’ll also do custom work, covering over any stains, logos or graphics you want to disguise.
Take a Look // Logo Removal Service :: Never Any Repeats / Transform + Renew
 (via Upcycled t-shirts with patched-over logos - Boing Boing)

Cool idea — and of course reminds me of The Uncollection! Love the idea of remixing what you own to replace logos, whether ours or something else!

Logo Removal Service takes discarded gimme shirts bedecked with sponsor logos, and carefully patches over them with new fabric, transforming them into amazing and abstract new one-of-a-kind garments.

They’ll also do custom work, covering over any stains, logos or graphics you want to disguise.

Take a Look // Logo Removal Service :: Never Any Repeats / Transform + Renew

 (via Upcycled t-shirts with patched-over logos - Boing Boing)

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