Posts tagged coffee
5:04 pm - Fri, Nov 9, 2012
63 notes

Coffee Fellow is … made from eight recycled coffee bean sacks with original prints from coffee plantations around the world. … All sacks have individual looks that depend on which coffee beans are most popular in Stockholm at the moment.

Designed by Johanna Hansson; info on her here. 
Previously: Coffee sack basket, ottoman, deck chair, and headboard.

Coffee Fellow is … made from eight recycled coffee bean sacks with original prints from coffee plantations around the world. … All sacks have individual looks that depend on which coffee beans are most popular in Stockholm at the moment.

Designed by Johanna Hansson; info on her here

Previously: Coffee sack basket, ottomandeck chair, and headboard.

3:49 pm - Sun, Oct 28, 2012
108 notes

A two-part container pressed from 100% recycled coffee waste.
The coffee aroma enhances the taste of the chocolates or biscuits placed inside. With no additional binders used, Waste ware is completely biodegradable, making it a healthy compost for your plants at the end of its lifetime.

By Matthijs Vogels. More: Waste ware | Droog 



We’ve published plenty of coffee-related items, but containers made from “coffee waste” seems pretty unusual!

A two-part container pressed from 100% recycled coffee waste.

The coffee aroma enhances the taste of the chocolates or biscuits placed inside. With no additional binders used, Waste ware is completely biodegradable, making it a healthy compost for your plants at the end of its lifetime.

By Matthijs Vogels. More: Waste ware | Droog
We’ve published plenty of coffee-related items, but containers made from “coffee waste” seems pretty unusual!
8:13 am - Thu, Oct 25, 2012
74 notes
Coffee-related reuse, continued:
Coffee sacks upcycled into a headboard.
Via me and jilly, which provides how-to DIY info. (Note: That blog post mentions using spray adhesive to attach batting to a base; I’d be inclined to use hot glue instead.)

Coffee-related reuse, continued:

Coffee sacks upcycled into a headboard.

Via me and jilly, which provides how-to DIY info. (Note: That blog post mentions using spray adhesive to attach batting to a base; I’d be inclined to use hot glue instead.)

1:46 pm - Thu, Oct 18, 2012
814 notes
Coffee-related reuse, continued:
Coffee cups upcycled into mini notebooks, made by Christin Ripley.
(via Inhabitat)

Coffee-related reuse, continued:

Coffee cups upcycled into mini notebooks, made by Christin Ripley.

(via Inhabitat)

3:15 pm - Mon, Oct 1, 2012
467 notes
npr:

felixsalmon:

You know those cardboard coffee sleeves you get for free at Starbucks? Well back in 1840 or so, they didn’t exist. Instead, they used things called Zarfs, into which they would place their hot coffee containers. Here’s one. It’s coming up at Christie’s, with an estimate of $150,000 to $200,000. That’s a bit more than “free”, of course. And it’s only 2.5” high, so you’re not going to be able to get much coffee in there. But still, imagine taking this into your local coffee shop, and explaining that if you really cared about your coffee, you’d use a zarf.

“Grande extra-hot pumpkin spice latte in a zarf, please.” — rachel

A rather elaborate example of reuse (circa 1840), but still. 
We’ve mentioned here what I’d say is a contemporary take on this: the “coffee cuff,” a wooden sleeve made from “architectural veneer offcuts,” that can be worn as a bracelet. 

npr:

felixsalmon:

You know those cardboard coffee sleeves you get for free at Starbucks? Well back in 1840 or so, they didn’t exist. Instead, they used things called Zarfs, into which they would place their hot coffee containers. Here’s one. It’s coming up at Christie’s, with an estimate of $150,000 to $200,000. That’s a bit more than “free”, of course. And it’s only 2.5” high, so you’re not going to be able to get much coffee in there. But still, imagine taking this into your local coffee shop, and explaining that if you really cared about your coffee, you’d use a zarf.

“Grande extra-hot pumpkin spice latte in a zarf, please.” — rachel

A rather elaborate example of reuse (circa 1840), but still. 

We’ve mentioned here what I’d say is a contemporary take on this: the “coffee cuff,” a wooden sleeve made from “architectural veneer offcuts,” that can be worn as a bracelet. 

2:08 pm - Thu, Aug 16, 2012
1,561 notes

Molasses Books in Bushwick, Brooklyn is a new bookstore that offers a change from the traditional retail model, letting customers trade their books for a coffee tab or even more books. The store owner, Matthew Winn, is also applying for a tavern license, which will enable them to swap for beer and wine in the future as well.

(via Brooklyn Bookstore Lets You Trade Paperbacks For Coffee - PSFK)

Molasses Books in Bushwick, Brooklyn is a new bookstore that offers a change from the traditional retail model, letting customers trade their books for a coffee tab or even more books. The store owner, Matthew Winn, is also applying for a tavern license, which will enable them to swap for beer and wine in the future as well.

(via Brooklyn Bookstore Lets You Trade Paperbacks For Coffee - PSFK)

4:00 pm - Sun, Aug 12, 2012
134 notes
thingsrecycledusefully:

Recycled Coffee Filter Lamps
Designer Vilma Farrell recycles used coffee filters into one-of-a-kind lamps. Talk about one man’s trash being another man’s treasure! While some lamps are given the earth-toned patterns of the naturally stained coffee filters, others are given additional color with vegetables and spices. Check out Lampada’s
via:  urbanesquemagazine

We’ve highlighted a number of coffee-related items here in the past, but this is a rather good one.

thingsrecycledusefully:

Recycled Coffee Filter Lamps

Designer Vilma Farrell recycles used coffee filters into one-of-a-kind lamps. Talk about one man’s trash being another man’s treasure! While some lamps are given the earth-toned patterns of the naturally stained coffee filters, others are given additional color with vegetables and spices. Check out Lampada’s

via:  urbanesquemagazine

We’ve highlighted a number of coffee-related items here in the past, but this is a rather good one.

4:13 pm - Tue, Mar 20, 2012
38 notes

The Lovewright Co. is a southern California-based lifestyle brand that’s teamed up with Jyumoku, another California based designer, who specializes in bags made from repurposed material to develop “The Roasters Collection.” The matching duffel and tote bag are made from salvaged military tents and contrasting burlap giving a refined quality to the idea of repurposed coffee sack bags.

[via Dear Coffee, I Love You.]

The Lovewright Co. is a southern California-based lifestyle brand that’s teamed up with Jyumoku, another California based designer, who specializes in bags made from repurposed material to develop “The Roasters Collection.” The matching duffel and tote bag are made from salvaged military tents and contrasting burlap giving a refined quality to the idea of repurposed coffee sack bags.

[via Dear Coffee, I Love You.]

9:09 pm - Thu, Feb 23, 2012
717 notes
1:23 pm
4,505 notes
szymon:

Hong Yi paints using coffee stains

Posts about Shanghai-based artist Hong Yi, who also goes by the name Red, have been making the online rounds recently. Last month, I spotted a photo of her painting of former Houston Rockets basketball player Yao Ming, for which she used a basketball to apply red paint to some surface (canvas? paper?), and now this coffee-rendered piece has turned up. Check out her work, if you haven’t seen it. [A time-lapse video (here) of Red moving her coffee cup to “paint” the above-pictured piece is interesting to watch.]
See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative uses of natural materials here.

szymon:

Hong Yi paints using coffee stains

Posts about Shanghai-based artist Hong Yi, who also goes by the name Red, have been making the online rounds recently. Last month, I spotted a photo of her painting of former Houston Rockets basketball player Yao Ming, for which she used a basketball to apply red paint to some surface (canvas? paper?), and now this coffee-rendered piece has turned up. Check out her work, if you haven’t seen it. [A time-lapse video (here) of Red moving her coffee cup to “paint” the above-pictured piece is interesting to watch.]

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative uses of natural materials here.

8:47 am - Wed, Feb 8, 2012
95 notes
Ottomans made from jute, fair-trade coffee sacks. (Think they smell like coffee beans?!)
(via Home Interiors)
More coffee-related items here.

Ottomans made from jute, fair-trade coffee sacks. (Think they smell like coffee beans?!)

(via Home Interiors)

More coffee-related items here.

3:34 pm - Fri, Jan 13, 2012
209 notes
The Keurig question: What to do with those used coffee cartridges?

If you received a one-cup coffee maker — or a box of coffee for one — as a Christmas gift, by now you likely have brewed through and tossed out plenty of those little capsules, and perhaps you’ve started to wonder about the environmental impact and the value of convenience.
Turns out that many people have opted for that convenience: In the 12 months ending in November, nearly 46% of the dollars going toward the purchase of coffee or espresso makers went to single-serve machines, according to NPD Group, a market research firm.
Keurig, a major player in the one-cup coffee business, reports that research it commissioned indicated that 13% of all U.S. offices have one of its brewers.
The company confronts the green issue head-on, saying on its website: “As the single-cup coffee market and our Keurig brewing systems grow in popularity, we understand that the impact of the K-Cup portion pack waste stream is one of our most significant environmental challenges.”
The K-cup coffee and tea cartridges are difficult to recycle because they are made of three materials: a plastic cup, which is lined with a heat-sealed paper filter, plus a polyethylene-coated aluminum foil top. Keurig says the packaging keeps coffee fresh, but the cartridges are not biodegradable.
Meanwhile, the Wall Street Journal has reported that 9 billion cartridges have been sold. Keurig said it doesn’t make that information public, but it did say sales of K-Cups more than doubled in 2011 over 2010.

Read the rest: LATimes.com

The Keurig question: What to do with those used coffee cartridges?

If you received a one-cup coffee maker — or a box of coffee for one — as a Christmas gift, by now you likely have brewed through and tossed out plenty of those little capsules, and perhaps you’ve started to wonder about the environmental impact and the value of convenience.

Turns out that many people have opted for that convenience: In the 12 months ending in November, nearly 46% of the dollars going toward the purchase of coffee or espresso makers went to single-serve machines, according to NPD Group, a market research firm.

Keurig, a major player in the one-cup coffee business, reports that research it commissioned indicated that 13% of all U.S. offices have one of its brewers.

The company confronts the green issue head-on, saying on its website: “As the single-cup coffee market and our Keurig brewing systems grow in popularity, we understand that the impact of the K-Cup portion pack waste stream is one of our most significant environmental challenges.”

The K-cup coffee and tea cartridges are difficult to recycle because they are made of three materials: a plastic cup, which is lined with a heat-sealed paper filter, plus a polyethylene-coated aluminum foil top. Keurig says the packaging keeps coffee fresh, but the cartridges are not biodegradable.

Meanwhile, the Wall Street Journal has reported that 9 billion cartridges have been sold. Keurig said it doesn’t make that information public, but it did say sales of K-Cups more than doubled in 2011 over 2010.

Read the rest: LATimes.com

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