Posts tagged christmas tree
1:38 pm - Tue, Feb 5, 2013
221 notes
Old Christmas trees help to rebuild storm-damaged beaches:

Thousands of Christmas trees, stripped of lights and ornaments, have been arranged along the beach here [Long Beach, New York] as part of an unusual plan to restore the protective dunes washed away by Hurricane Sandy. The trees are supposed to catch sand blown by the wind, until gradually the dunes grow up around them.
Long Beach, one of the localities in the New York region most devastated by the storm, is a thin ribbon of land between Long Island and the Atlantic Ocean. The storm washed away about half a million cubic yards of sand, officials said, leaving residents dangerously exposed to even modestly inclement weather.
…
From a distance, the trees resemble a somewhat bizarre gathering on the beach, like a large pod of exceptionally fuzzy seals. There are about 3,000 in all. The local Home Depot donated some. Others stood in the living rooms of residents until recently, adorned with decorations.
Other localities in New York and New Jersey are also using Christmas trees to buttress beaches damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Healthy sand dunes are the first line of defense for coastal towns during storms because they keep the ocean from invading backyards and basements. But sand alone is not enough. An anchor, often naturally growing grasses, is needed to prevent the sand from blowing or washing away.
But the grasses cannot grow without a significant accumulation of sand, and in Long Beach these days there simply is not enough. That is where the Christmas trees come in.
…
The method is not uncommon, particularly in areas like the Carolinas and Florida that are prone to hurricanes. It can take two to three years for dunes to become fully re-established after a major storm.
The afterlives of Christmas trees can be quite dynamic. In southern Louisiana, the trees are woven into fences and used to block dangerous levels of saltwater from flowing into coastal wetlands. They have been used in Illinois to create nesting structures for herons and egrets forced from natural habitats by development. [In California, trees have played a role in the building of lake habitats.]
In Long Beach, several residents proposed placing the trees in the dunes. City officials approved the plan, and about 100 volunteers gathered on the beach the other day to arrange the trees with their tops facing toward the surf. The configuration, officials hope, will catch sand blowing from all directions.

(via On Decimated Shore, a Second Life for Christmas Trees - NYTimes.com)
[Special note from proud Texan Molly: Something similar’s been done on Texas beaches.] 

Old Christmas trees help to rebuild storm-damaged beaches:

Thousands of Christmas trees, stripped of lights and ornaments, have been arranged along the beach here [Long Beach, New York] as part of an unusual plan to restore the protective dunes washed away by Hurricane Sandy. The trees are supposed to catch sand blown by the wind, until gradually the dunes grow up around them.

Long Beach, one of the localities in the New York region most devastated by the storm, is a thin ribbon of land between Long Island and the Atlantic Ocean. The storm washed away about half a million cubic yards of sand, officials said, leaving residents dangerously exposed to even modestly inclement weather.

From a distance, the trees resemble a somewhat bizarre gathering on the beach, like a large pod of exceptionally fuzzy seals. There are about 3,000 in all. The local Home Depot donated some. Others stood in the living rooms of residents until recently, adorned with decorations.

Other localities in New York and New Jersey are also using Christmas trees to buttress beaches damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Healthy sand dunes are the first line of defense for coastal towns during storms because they keep the ocean from invading backyards and basements. But sand alone is not enough. An anchor, often naturally growing grasses, is needed to prevent the sand from blowing or washing away.

But the grasses cannot grow without a significant accumulation of sand, and in Long Beach these days there simply is not enough. That is where the Christmas trees come in.

The method is not uncommon, particularly in areas like the Carolinas and Florida that are prone to hurricanes. It can take two to three years for dunes to become fully re-established after a major storm.

The afterlives of Christmas trees can be quite dynamic. In southern Louisiana, the trees are woven into fences and used to block dangerous levels of saltwater from flowing into coastal wetlands. They have been used in Illinois to create nesting structures for herons and egrets forced from natural habitats by development. [In California, trees have played a role in the building of lake habitats.]

In Long Beach, several residents proposed placing the trees in the dunes. City officials approved the plan, and about 100 volunteers gathered on the beach the other day to arrange the trees with their tops facing toward the surf. The configuration, officials hope, will catch sand blowing from all directions.

(via On Decimated Shore, a Second Life for Christmas Trees - NYTimes.com)

[Special note from proud Texan Molly: Something similar’s been done on Texas beaches.] 

2:49 pm - Fri, Jan 4, 2013
79 notes
What do you do with your old holiday cards? 
Perhaps you cut the fronts of cards into pieces for use as tags on gifts, or as ornaments on trees, or to hang on string as garland/bunting? 
If you find a card’s artwork really attractive, maybe you’ve placed it in an old frame (or in a great frame you scored at a yard sale or thrift store), or displayed it in a CD case, and used it as decor? 
Here’s a different idea: You could make a tabletop tree or two, like the ones pictured above from Better Homes and Gardens (use a chopstick for the “trunk”), or make a mini tree like one we featured earlier (example here, another here).
Do you receive fewer holiday cards than you used to? I think many of us do — and many of us appreciate the fact that our friends and/or family members no longer send them! 
So, tell us: What do you do with old cards?

What do you do with your old holiday cards? 

Perhaps you cut the fronts of cards into pieces for use as tags on gifts, or as ornaments on trees, or to hang on string as garland/bunting

If you find a card’s artwork really attractive, maybe you’ve placed it in an old frame (or in a great frame you scored at a yard sale or thrift store), or displayed it in a CD case, and used it as decor? 

Here’s a different idea: You could make a tabletop tree or two, like the ones pictured above from Better Homes and Gardens (use a chopstick for the “trunk”), or make a mini tree like one we featured earlier (example here, another here).

Do you receive fewer holiday cards than you used to? I think many of us do — and many of us appreciate the fact that our friends and/or family members no longer send them! 

So, tell us: What do you do with old cards?

1:58 pm - Tue, Dec 18, 2012
63 notes


In collaboration with local residents the city of Hasselt in Belgium, Inge Vanluyd and Stefan Vanbergen of creative agency Mooz have designed an impressive Christmas tree made of 5,000 old plates and cups.
Speaking about the project Inge Vanluyd and Stefan Vanbergen said, “At home we all have odd plates and cups which just don’t go with anything and as a consequence never find their way out of the cupboard. We noticed that friends and family also had ‘spare’ plates hanging around the house. This was enough to get us thinking about a creative destination for these everyday objects. That’s how we ended up with a porcelain Christmas tree. We decorated the tree with objects which would otherwise have remained invisible”


More here.

In collaboration with local residents the city of Hasselt in Belgium, Inge Vanluyd and Stefan Vanbergen of creative agency Mooz have designed an impressive Christmas tree made of 5,000 old plates and cups.

Speaking about the project Inge Vanluyd and Stefan Vanbergen said, “At home we all have odd plates and cups which just don’t go with anything and as a consequence never find their way out of the cupboard. We noticed that friends and family also had ‘spare’ plates hanging around the house. This was enough to get us thinking about a creative destination for these everyday objects. That’s how we ended up with a porcelain Christmas tree. We decorated the tree with objects which would otherwise have remained invisible”

More here.

8:56 am - Wed, Dec 12, 2012
368 notes
christmasdecorating:


DIY Christmas Tree Tutorial Here



Postcards! 
4:13 pm - Fri, Dec 7, 2012
186 notes
radio-ladi0:




This is my creation for the “Tree of the Year” competition.
The materials in the tree are circuits from electronic waste.
All materials are recycled.





We thought we’d seen Christmas trees made from just about everything. Now there’s this cool one made from e-waste! Love!

radio-ladi0:

This is my creation for the “Tree of the Year” competition.

The materials in the tree are circuits from electronic waste.

All materials are recycled.

We thought we’d seen Christmas trees made from just about everything. Now there’s this cool one made from e-waste! Love!

12:38 pm - Thu, Dec 6, 2012
239 notes
Repurposing for the holidays
Why not turn egg cartons into a tree? Or make ornaments out of them?
For additional reuse ideas and inspiration, check out the gallery of trees made from repurposed materials here, and other items — ornaments, garland, wreaths, and more — here.
(photo: Colégio Bernardette Romeira)

Repurposing for the holidays

Why not turn egg cartons into a tree? Or make ornaments out of them?

For additional reuse ideas and inspiration, check out the gallery of trees made from repurposed materials here, and other items — ornaments, garland, wreaths, and more — here.

(photo: Colégio Bernardette Romeira)

4:56 pm - Tue, Nov 27, 2012
167 notes
DIY project du jour:
Glue buttons onto an old rake head.
Et voilà — Christmas tree!
(Spotted on Facebook here, and Pinterest here.) 

DIY project du jour:

Glue buttons onto an old rake head.

Et voilà — Christmas tree!

(Spotted on Facebook here, and Pinterest here.) 

2:18 pm - Sun, Dec 25, 2011
50 notes
Now here’s a little Unconsumption-y holiday spirit.
(Spotted on Pinterest, via 2gypsygirls.)
More funnel repurposing here.

Now here’s a little Unconsumption-y holiday spirit.

(Spotted on Pinterest, via 2gypsygirls.)

More funnel repurposing here.

1:07 pm - Sat, Dec 24, 2011
105 notes
I realize that we’ve already posted a good number of Christmas-related items here on Unconsumption, but I couldn’t resist adding this vintage ruler tree to the mix. (Photo via Unconsumption’s “holiday things” Pinterest board, repinned from Whole Foods.)
If you follow us on Twitter or Facebook, you might recall my posting of this Instagram photo of my vintage ruler/yardstick collection; I think that photo helps to explain why I’m drawn to this ruler “tree”!

I realize that we’ve already posted a good number of Christmas-related items here on Unconsumption, but I couldn’t resist adding this vintage ruler tree to the mix. (Photo via Unconsumption’s “holiday things” Pinterest board, repinned from Whole Foods.)

If you follow us on Twitter or Facebook, you might recall my posting of this Instagram photo of my vintage ruler/yardstick collection; I think that photo helps to explain why I’m drawn to this ruler “tree”!

12:23 pm
1,904 notes
eyepod:

via Michael Johansson)

Looks like this piece, titled Merry Mirror, from 2010 follows Johansson’s Shelf-made Christmas tree from 2009 (featured previously here).
This is a great addition to the Unconsumption gallery of alternative Christmas trees.

eyepod:

via Michael Johansson)

Looks like this piece, titled Merry Mirror, from 2010 follows Johansson’s Shelf-made Christmas tree from 2009 (featured previously here).

This is a great addition to the Unconsumption gallery of alternative Christmas trees.

(via lustik)

12:05 pm
48 notes
Michael Johansson. Shelf-made Christmas tree, 2009.
(Johansson mentioned previously on Unconsumption here.)
See also: other unconventional Christmas trees here.

Michael JohanssonShelf-made Christmas tree, 2009.

(Johansson mentioned previously on Unconsumption here.)

See also: other unconventional Christmas trees here.

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