Posts tagged books
12:23 pm - Sat, Dec 24, 2011
1,905 notes
eyepod:

via Michael Johansson)

Looks like this piece, titled Merry Mirror, from 2010 follows Johansson’s Shelf-made Christmas tree from 2009 (featured previously here).
This is a great addition to the Unconsumption gallery of alternative Christmas trees.

eyepod:

via Michael Johansson)

Looks like this piece, titled Merry Mirror, from 2010 follows Johansson’s Shelf-made Christmas tree from 2009 (featured previously here).

This is a great addition to the Unconsumption gallery of alternative Christmas trees.

(via lustik)

9:47 am - Mon, Dec 19, 2011
48 notes
Altered book by artist Boukje Voet.
(via Dude Craft)

Altered book by artist Boukje Voet.

(via Dude Craft)

9:39 am
78 notes
Artist Jonathan Whitfill’s repurposed book art.
For other bookish things, check the Unconsumption archive here.

Artist Jonathan Whitfill’s repurposed book art.

For other bookish things, check the Unconsumption archive here.

4:56 pm - Thu, Dec 15, 2011
72 notes
Another waste-free Christmas tree!
Our friends at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco just shared with us a set of photos of their handsome 2011 book tree. The nine-foot-tall tree’s constructed from some 700 books — approximately 3,250 pounds’ worth. This year marks the third year that Gleeson Library’s had a book tree.
You might recall Gleeson Library’s Internet-famous 2010 tree, which we featured here last year and in this recent post on the spreading of the idea of building book trees. (A no-waste decorating trend involving books is a good trend in, ahem, my book.)
For additional photos of the 2011 Gleeson tree, see shawncalhoun’s set of photos on Flickr. (Thanks, Shawn, for the heads up!)

Another waste-free Christmas tree!

Our friends at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco just shared with us a set of photos of their handsome 2011 book tree. The nine-foot-tall tree’s constructed from some 700 books — approximately 3,250 pounds’ worth. This year marks the third year that Gleeson Library’s had a book tree.

You might recall Gleeson Library’s Internet-famous 2010 tree, which we featured here last year and in this recent post on the spreading of the idea of building book trees. (A no-waste decorating trend involving books is a good trend in, ahem, my book.)

For additional photos of the 2011 Gleeson tree, see shawncalhoun’s set of photos on Flickr. (Thanks, Shawn, for the heads up!)

5:11 pm - Wed, Dec 14, 2011
75 notes
More books = more Christmas trees
Okay, so I keep thinking that I won’t post other holiday-related items. And then I come across things that we haven’t shared here on Unconsumption, and I feel compelled to post them!
So, here we go: Four additional examples of trees made from books.
(“Tree” pictured above via Goose Hill. Thanks to Annie for pointing it out to me.)

(via The Blog on the Bookshelf)
If you aren’t too worried about your books’ bindings/spines, you could make something like this:

(via Aga Inés on Flickr)

(via Real Simple)
For other book tree examples, check out these earlier Unconsumption posts. Tabletop trees? Look here. Alternative Christmas trees, in general, and other holiday tree-related posts: here.

More books = more Christmas trees

Okay, so I keep thinking that I won’t post other holiday-related items. And then I come across things that we haven’t shared here on Unconsumption, and I feel compelled to post them!

So, here we go: Four additional examples of trees made from books.

(“Tree” pictured above via Goose Hill. Thanks to Annie for pointing it out to me.)

(via The Blog on the Bookshelf)

If you aren’t too worried about your books’ bindings/spines, you could make something like this:

(via Aga Inés on Flickr)

(via Real Simple)

For other book tree examples, check out these earlier Unconsumption posts. Tabletop trees? Look here. Alternative Christmas trees, in general, and other holiday tree-related posts: here.

8:36 am
124 notes
More books = more Christmas trees
To add to our post from last week about alternative Christmas trees constructed out of books, there’s this novel on-shelf “tree” made by Thatcher Wine and his colleagues at Juniper Books in Boulder (mentioned previously here and here).
Thirty olive-green law books, 24 of which were cut, comprise the eight-foot-tall tree. The books are substantial enough to stay upright on their own with no support placed behind them.
About the cutting/carving of books: Thatcher explains that there’s an abundant supply of law books, with law firms and university libraries no longer needing copies in print once they’ve digitized their holdings. He estimates that Juniper has repurposed some 10,000 law books this year, including thousands going to retailers and designers for “decoration and visual merchandising.” He adds that the cutting of two dozen books to make this display might have saved those unneeded books from a far worse fate!
(Via Christmas tree of books 2011 — JuniperBooks.com. Thanks, Thatcher!)

Related: Juniper Books’ 2010 tree made from 800 stacked books. 

More books = more Christmas trees

To add to our post from last week about alternative Christmas trees constructed out of books, there’s this novel on-shelf “tree” made by Thatcher Wine and his colleagues at Juniper Books in Boulder (mentioned previously here and here).

Thirty olive-green law books, 24 of which were cut, comprise the eight-foot-tall tree. The books are substantial enough to stay upright on their own with no support placed behind them.

About the cutting/carving of books: Thatcher explains that there’s an abundant supply of law books, with law firms and university libraries no longer needing copies in print once they’ve digitized their holdings. He estimates that Juniper has repurposed some 10,000 law books this year, including thousands going to retailers and designers for “decoration and visual merchandising.” He adds that the cutting of two dozen books to make this display might have saved those unneeded books from a far worse fate!

(Via Christmas tree of books 2011 — JuniperBooks.com. Thanks, Thatcher!)

Related: Juniper Books’ 2010 tree made from 800 stacked books. 

8:56 am - Mon, Dec 12, 2011
280 notes

mollyblock:

How-to: Make a “paper tree” in five easy steps

This project was inspired by two things: 1.) A neat “printed paper pine” item from Anthropologie, and 2.) my discovery, in the attic of my parents’ house, of an assortment of vintage sheet music — mainly trumpet and saxophone parts from the 1950s-1970s (that hadn’t been touched since the 1970s) when my father played in a band. 

Materials needed:

  • One chopstick
  • Something into which the chopstick can be anchored, like a scrap piece of wood, so the stick stands vertically (I upcycled an old plastic reel-to-reel tape spool as a base)
  • Several pages of printed sheet music, pages from a discarded book (or book you’ll no longer read), old holiday cards, or pages from magazines or catalogs
  • A piece of cardboard, roughly 1.5’x2’ in size 

Tools: 

  • Pinking shears, or something else that provides a decorative edge
  • Scissors
  • An ice pick, or other hole-punching device
  • Optional: Glue, small nail, hammer

Estimated time for completion: 

  • A couple of hours, though you probably can multi-task (read blogs, like I did, or watch TV) while working. 

Steps:

  1. Using pinking shears, or another cutting tool, cut the music (or other paper pieces) into squares. I cut my largest square approximately 5” x 5”, and smallest 1” x 1”. As I went along, I didn’t measure the pieces, but estimated the size based on that of the squares I’d just cut. For one tree, I used 40 paper squares. 
  2. Next, use scissors to cut the cardboard into small squares to add as spacers between the paper squares. The cardboard squares should be considerably smaller than the paper squares — that’ll help make the cardboard less visible. (I used a piece of recycled cardboard that held a case of cat food — it’s thinner and less rigid than some cardboard which made it easier to cut, I think.) Cut out the same number of cardboard squares as you have paper squares. 
  3. Poke holes in the center of the paper and cardboard squares. With an ice pick, I was able to punch holes through several squares at the same time. (Your mileage may vary.)
  4. Next, place your chopstick in whatever object you have handy to use as a base. You may want to nail or glue the chopstick into/onto your object. (I didn’t need to — my chopstick fits pretty snugly into my base.) 
  5. Now place the cardboard and paper squares onto the chopstick, pushing them down from the chopstick’s tapered end. Start with your largest square of cardboard, then add your largest piece of music on top of it. Continue stacking the cardboard and paper squares, keeping an eye on how your “tree” is shaping up. Hopefully, it’s a nice cone shape. 

As your layering of squares nears the top of the chopstick, stop at whatever point you want to. You could put a dot of glue on the topmost cardboard piece and paper square, to hold them in place. (I’d like to take the tree apart after the holidays — to store everything flat in a box — so I didn’t add glue.) Also, I left my chopstick top bare because I like the minimal look of it. You may want to “top” your tree with something.  

 That’s it. Place your tree on a table, and enjoy!  

Note: This project carries a stamp of approval from Veto, my feline quality control officer.

Yes, yours truly (Unconsumptioneer Molly) posted a tutorial for something I made. Hope it inspires you to make something of your own! 

9:21 am - Sat, Dec 10, 2011
111 notes
Books = Christmas trees
Do you remember our December 2010 post about a Christmas tree made from books at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco, or our post about this smaller book tree? Or perhaps you saw some mention last year of the book tree constructed by the folks at Juniper Books in Boulder?
Well, it looks like the book tree idea has caught on in other places. In Poland, librarians at the University Library of UWM (University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn), made the above-pictured tree from 1,600 books. (That’s a lot of copies of George Orwell’s 1984 and Joseph Heller’s Picture This!) Click here for details and here to view a Flickr stream showing 50+ shots of the tree, including several photos captured during the construction process, a how-to for others who want to build book trees.
And here’s a book tree located at the Inglewood Public Library, in the Los Angeles area.
Let us know if you spot other book trees elsewhere.
Related: Unconsumption posts about trees made from other non-traditional materials: shopping carts, bicycle parts, 40,000 plastic bottles, upside down tomato cages with strings of lights, wood scraps.

Books = Christmas trees

Do you remember our December 2010 post about a Christmas tree made from books at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco, or our post about this smaller book tree? Or perhaps you saw some mention last year of the book tree constructed by the folks at Juniper Books in Boulder?

Well, it looks like the book tree idea has caught on in other places. In Poland, librarians at the University Library of UWM (University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn), made the above-pictured tree from 1,600 books. (That’s a lot of copies of George Orwell’s 1984 and Joseph Heller’s Picture This!) Click here for details and here to view a Flickr stream showing 50+ shots of the tree, including several photos captured during the construction process, a how-to for others who want to build book trees.

And here’s a book tree located at the Inglewood Public Library, in the Los Angeles area.

Let us know if you spot other book trees elsewhere.

Related: Unconsumption posts about trees made from other non-traditional materials: shopping cartsbicycle parts, 40,000 plastic bottles, upside down tomato cages with strings of lightswood scraps.

2:03 pm - Sun, Nov 27, 2011
44 notes
Have you checked out BookScouter.com to help give you an idea of the value of used books? If so, leave a comment below. I (Molly) haven’t used the site, yet, and I’m curious to hear feedback about your experience. 
From the site:

BookScouter helps you to sell your books for the highest price. It compares prices from over 40 book-buying websites so that you can quickly find the site that is paying the most for your books. The prices that these sites offer can vary widely, and it is difficult and time consuming to check all of them. Instead of manually visiting each site, now you can just put in the book’s ISBN Number here, and we’ll search all of the available sites for what they are currently paying for your book. Now you can easily see where you can get the most money for your used books.

(via BookScouter.com)

Have you checked out BookScouter.com to help give you an idea of the value of used books? If so, leave a comment below. I (Molly) haven’t used the site, yet, and I’m curious to hear feedback about your experience. 

From the site:

BookScouter helps you to sell your books for the highest price. It compares prices from over 40 book-buying websites so that you can quickly find the site that is paying the most for your books. The prices that these sites offer can vary widely, and it is difficult and time consuming to check all of them. Instead of manually visiting each site, now you can just put in the book’s ISBN Number here, and we’ll search all of the available sites for what they are currently paying for your book. Now you can easily see where you can get the most money for your used books.

(via BookScouter.com)

9:45 am - Thu, Nov 24, 2011
46 notes

Recently, as if by fate, an advance copy of a book arrived in the mail that is without doubt the most helpful tome for anyone with a cluttering tendency. It’s called “The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life” (published Tuesday by Rodale Books). It was written by Robin Zasio, a clinical psychologist, a star of the show “Hoarders” and director of the Anxiety Treatment Center in Sacramento.

I would say that Dr. Zasio’s book is about the best self-help work I’ve read in my 46 years as a health and science writer. She seems to know all the excuses and impediments to coping effectively with a cluttering problem, and she offers practical, clinically proven antidotes to them.

Unless you are an extreme hoarder (the kind portrayed on the show) who requires a year or more of professional therapy, the explanations and steps described in the book can help any garden-variety clutterer better understand the source of the problem and its negative consequences, as well as overcome it and keep it from recurring.

Though it is not possible here to include all of Dr. Zasio’s lessons, here are a few I think are especially helpful.

Perhaps most important is to tackle just one project at a time and stick with it until it is done. “Start with the easiest, and be proud of what you’ve done,” Dr. Zasio said in an interview. Then gradually move on to more challenging projects.

Schedule time for decluttering — say, an hour each day on most days, until you’re done.

There’s no question that parting with stuff you’ve collected and thought valuable can trigger anxiety. But, as Dr. Zasio says and I have found, the anticipated anxiety is usually worse than what actually ensues. Even if it is acute, the anxiety dissipates if you sit down or do something fun or relaxing until it passes.

Make three piles (or bins) of stuff: Keep, Donate, Discard. (Avoid my mistake of making a fourth pile called Undecided that you simply wind up moving to another part of the house.) Get rid of the Discard and Donate piles as soon as possible. Keep only those things that have a realistic “home” in your home.

Read the rest: NYTimes.com

9:41 am - Wed, Nov 23, 2011
99 notes
Old books = new bird house.
via Curled up with a book

Old books = new bird house.

via Curled up with a book

8:24 am - Thu, Nov 3, 2011
115 notes
Artist Francisca Prieto turns old catalogs, books, maps, and other printed materials into works of art. She folds each page using origami techniques, then joins together the folded pieces.

Francisca provides the unique experience of being able to look at a book and all of its pages at once, yet unable to read any one page individually. A hidden narrative emerges in each work through the connections that Francisca makes both in terms of the folded structures she creates, and the conceptual connections of the images and text selected.

(via Design*Sponge)
See also: Other creative new uses for books and maps.

Artist Francisca Prieto turns old catalogs, books, maps, and other printed materials into works of art. She folds each page using origami techniques, then joins together the folded pieces.

Francisca provides the unique experience of being able to look at a book and all of its pages at once, yet unable to read any one page individually. A hidden narrative emerges in each work through the connections that Francisca makes both in terms of the folded structures she creates, and the conceptual connections of the images and text selected.

(via Design*Sponge)

See also: Other creative new uses for books and maps.

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