Posts tagged Waste
12:20 pm - Tue, Aug 12, 2014
123 notes

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.
This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

In order to improve the quality of the water and the riverbeds at the same time, the local community [In Jakarta] and many volunteers collected waste of the Ciliwung River and re-used it to strengthen and broaden the riverbeds where people are living.

This way frequent floods are prevented from destroying the lives of the poor people — quite an inventive way of dealing with trash. Meanwhile, many other movements have emerged and organizations are involved with the revitalization of the living environment alongside the river. 

Read more here: Building On Trash In Jakarta — Pop-Up City

3:40 pm - Wed, Jul 23, 2014
70 notes

A conceptual design for a London skyscraper by Paris studio Chartier-Corbasson Architectes proposes using waste generated by workers already in the building to help construct new floors as demand grows.

More: Chartier-Corbasson Architectes’ Organic Skyscraper made from rubbish

A conceptual design for a London skyscraper by Paris studio Chartier-Corbasson Architectes proposes using waste generated by workers already in the building to help construct new floors as demand grows.

More: Chartier-Corbasson Architectes’ Organic Skyscraper made from rubbish

12:20 pm - Thu, Jul 3, 2014
28 notes

Milan 2014: Philippe Starck has developed a counter stool and bar stool to complement the Broom Chair he designed for American furniture brand Emeco using a material predominantly made from industrial waste.

More: Philippe Starck creates stools made from recycled materials for Emeco

Milan 2014: Philippe Starck has developed a counter stool and bar stool to complement the Broom Chair he designed for American furniture brand Emeco using a material predominantly made from industrial waste.

More: Philippe Starck creates stools made from recycled materials for Emeco

11:37 am - Mon, Mar 17, 2014
63 notes

A groundbreaking and innovative project is set to tackle issues of agricultural waste and lack of housing in Africa.
Professor of Architecture and Design Theory Bachelor Architecture Charles Job has collaborated with the Bern University of Applied Arts to acquire a research project that aims to develop building materials from agricultural waste products for affordable housing in Nigeria.
The ultimate goal of the research project is to provide a series of prototype case study houses that are informed by local building traditions and can be integrated into the local community. With this goal in mind, the research project aims to use locally-sourced agricultural waste materials such as corn cobs, rice husks and groundnut shells as a sustainable alternative to cement, as well as a more cost-effective alternative to imported timber products for the construction of low-cost houses. Using these materials further reduces the pollution released by the incarnation of corn, rice and groundnut residue.
The “Occasional Table” is the first prototype on which Jobs hopes to continue and extend the research project. The tables are simple interlocking shapes, each made from a different recycled agricultural waste material. The tabletops are attached to the supporting legs with strong magnets to simplify production, transport and self-assembly. The table reveals how the material can be applied to various designs including walls for low-cost housing.

More: Urban possibilities | Design Indaba

A groundbreaking and innovative project is set to tackle issues of agricultural waste and lack of housing in Africa.

Professor of Architecture and Design Theory Bachelor Architecture Charles Job has collaborated with the Bern University of Applied Arts to acquire a research project that aims to develop building materials from agricultural waste products for affordable housing in Nigeria.

The ultimate goal of the research project is to provide a series of prototype case study houses that are informed by local building traditions and can be integrated into the local community. With this goal in mind, the research project aims to use locally-sourced agricultural waste materials such as corn cobs, rice husks and groundnut shells as a sustainable alternative to cement, as well as a more cost-effective alternative to imported timber products for the construction of low-cost houses. Using these materials further reduces the pollution released by the incarnation of corn, rice and groundnut residue.

The “Occasional Table” is the first prototype on which Jobs hopes to continue and extend the research project. The tables are simple interlocking shapes, each made from a different recycled agricultural waste material. The tabletops are attached to the supporting legs with strong magnets to simplify production, transport and self-assembly. The table reveals how the material can be applied to various designs including walls for low-cost housing.

More: Urban possibilities | Design Indaba

3:40 pm - Tue, Dec 31, 2013
70 notes

Deputy Mayor Cas Holloway announced …  the city’s approval of a plan to convert organic waste and wastewater from schools and as many as 100,000 homes into a biogas that is mostly methane, which is already being used to power thousands of homes in the city.

3:40 pm - Fri, Dec 20, 2013
96 notes

Garbage to gold: An experimental project, Upcycle House by Lendager Arkitekter, in Nyborg, Denmark, aims for extreme carbon emission reduction by building a home from converted post-consumer waste, recycled and upcycled into primary construction materials.

(via Upcycle House by Lendager Arkitekter)

Garbage to gold: An experimental project, Upcycle House by Lendager Arkitekter, in Nyborg, Denmark, aims for extreme carbon emission reduction by building a home from converted post-consumer waste, recycled and upcycled into primary construction materials.

(via Upcycle House by Lendager Arkitekter)

12:20 pm - Thu, Sep 26, 2013
115 notes

Right now we’re working on the Waste Project, with tables and chairs and other things that we make from waste material left over from our own production. This project started in 2000, but we’re still working on it on many different levels.
One of the new things is a Waste Waste 40x40 series—so it’s made of the waste of the Waste Project. Instead of the leftovers determining the size and the image of the product, we cut everything down to 40-by-40-millimeter blocks.
It’s a totally different approaching to using the leftovers, and we’re using almost everything because it’s a very small size. And that provides beautiful new objects.

(via Piet Hein Eek on Making Furniture from Waste, Building the Perfect Work Environment, and Why Designers Should Be Generalists - Core77)

Right now we’re working on the Waste Project, with tables and chairs and other things that we make from waste material left over from our own production. This project started in 2000, but we’re still working on it on many different levels.

One of the new things is a Waste Waste 40x40 series—so it’s made of the waste of the Waste Project. Instead of the leftovers determining the size and the image of the product, we cut everything down to 40-by-40-millimeter blocks.

It’s a totally different approaching to using the leftovers, and we’re using almost everything because it’s a very small size. And that provides beautiful new objects.

(via Piet Hein Eek on Making Furniture from Waste, Building the Perfect Work Environment, and Why Designers Should Be Generalists - Core77)

12:20 pm - Wed, Jun 12, 2013
34 notes
Okay this is not exactly the ideal form of Unconsumption, but seemed amusingly weird enough to pass along: 

Artist James Dive’s “Once” consists of a 4 x 4 meter cube of demolished and compacted amusement park. A closer look reveals midway prizes, lights, tickets, garishly-painted metal scraps, and other mementos of old time carny fun. I’m just waiting for the bits to begin creaking back into shape like at the end of the movie Christine.

On View: James Dive’s “Once” for “Sculpture by the Sea”
Art: compacted cube of demolished amusement park - Boing Boing

Okay this is not exactly the ideal form of Unconsumption, but seemed amusingly weird enough to pass along:

Artist James Dive’s “Once” consists of a 4 x 4 meter cube of demolished and compacted amusement park. A closer look reveals midway prizes, lights, tickets, garishly-painted metal scraps, and other mementos of old time carny fun. I’m just waiting for the bits to begin creaking back into shape like at the end of the movie Christine.

On View: James Dive’s “Once” for “Sculpture by the Sea

Art: compacted cube of demolished amusement park - Boing Boing

4:52 pm - Tue, Mar 5, 2013
178 notes
emergentfutures:

How GM Makes $1 Billion A Year By Recycling Waste
The automaker generates an eye-popping $1 billion a year reusing or recycling materials that would otherwise be thrown away — everything from scrap steel and paint sludge to cardboard boxes and worn-out tires. It’s an unexpected but welcome revenue stream that comes from rethinking its approach to waste reduction.
Full Story: Forbes

emergentfutures:

How GM Makes $1 Billion A Year By Recycling Waste

The automaker generates an eye-popping $1 billion a year reusing or recycling materials that would otherwise be thrown away — everything from scrap steel and paint sludge to cardboard boxes and worn-out tires. It’s an unexpected but welcome revenue stream that comes from rethinking its approach to waste reduction.

Full Story: Forbes

6:21 pm - Fri, Mar 1, 2013
58 notes

More news from Houston:

One Bin For All" idea could boost recycling rates, generate biofuel, reduce landfilling, and serve as a model for other cities

Michael Bloomberg’s op-ed piece in the Houston Chronicle describes the idea:

For years, many cities have treated recycling as an individual civic responsibility like paying taxes or jury duty. The onus is on citizens to do the work of separating trash from recyclables: metal, glass and plastic in one bin, paper in another and landfill items in a third, while city trash collectors cart it away sometimes using a different truck for each kind of waste. Not surprisingly, it’s estimated that cities only effectively recycle about 30 percent of their trash.

Houston Mayor Annise Parker aims to turn this equation on its head. Instead of pushing to get consumers to do a better job separating trash from recyclables, she believes tapping technology can get the job done. Her plan is called Total Reuse: One Bin for All, which envisions the construction of a high-tech sorting facility that would allow 75 percent of Houston’s trash to be recycled using technologies from the mining and refining industries and would potentially generate its own power. Residents put everything in one bin; technology handles the rest.

Houston is one of 20 cities vying for $5 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge. The City of Houston plans to pursue the total reuse initiative regardless of whether it’s awarded Mayors Challenge funding.

[Update, via a City of Houston media release: Houston’s project was awarded a $1 million grant from the Mayors Challenge, and also was voted the “fan favorite.”

Providence, Rhode Island, won the Mayors Challenge top prize of $5 million for its literacy project; read more about all five award-winning cities’ projects in this New York Times article.]

10:43 am - Tue, Feb 19, 2013
2,249 notes

Vancouver-based artist Brian Jungen created this domed ‘turtle shell’ out of industrial waste and recycling bins. In past works Brian has used plastic chairs, hockey equipment, and plastic food trays.

(via Juxtapoz Magazine - “Carapace,” Recycling Bin Art by Brian Junger | Current)

Vancouver-based artist Brian Jungen created this domed ‘turtle shell’ out of industrial waste and recycling bins. In past works Brian has used plastic chairs, hockey equipment, and plastic food trays.

(via Juxtapoz Magazine - “Carapace,” Recycling Bin Art by Brian Junger | Current)

6:44 pm - Fri, Feb 15, 2013
132 notes
Stools incorporating “rejected leather,” among the projects from Pepe Heykoop (earlier mention here):

Leather Loops is another reaction to waste leather. Fully rejected skins, faded by sunlight or with too many damages are used in this project. Like an l.p. the leather tops can easily be swapped within the family of frames.

(via www.pepeheykoop.nl)

Stools incorporating “rejected leather,” among the projects from Pepe Heykoop (earlier mention here):

Leather Loops is another reaction to waste leather. Fully rejected skins, faded by sunlight or with too many damages are used in this project. Like an l.p. the leather tops can easily be swapped within the family of frames.

(via www.pepeheykoop.nl)

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