Posts tagged Sculpture
3:40 pm - Mon, Sep 1, 2014
500 notes
laughingsquid:

Japanese artist Makaon uses aluminum cans to make delightful figure sculptures of characters from video games, movies, and other pop culture sources. He has more aluminum can sculptures on his website and blog.
Delightful Aluminum Can Sculptures of Pop Culture Characters

laughingsquid:

Japanese artist Makaon uses aluminum cans to make delightful figure sculptures of characters from video games, movies, and other pop culture sources. He has more aluminum can sculptures on his website and blog.

Delightful Aluminum Can Sculptures of Pop Culture Characters

12:20 pm - Mon, Aug 11, 2014
167 notes

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures.
His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors.
You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson.

(via A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf | Colossal)

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures.

His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors.

You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson.

(via A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf | Colossal)

12:20 pm - Mon, Jul 21, 2014
755 notes

fer1972:

Upcycled Star Wars Junk Tech Busts by Gabriel Dishaw 

Using found objects from typewriters, adding machines and old computers, I take the items people no longer have use for and I carefully disassembling these items and then reassemble these together using metal wire creating my Junk Art.

3:40 pm - Sun, Jun 29, 2014
115 notes



Jeremy Underwood’s ongoing photo series Human Debris repurposes found trash into site-specific sculptures.




Municipal waterways often double as highways for garbage—a well-known and highly visible problem with no obvious solution. So when photographer Jeremy Underwood stumbled across an especially polluted beach in Houston, he decided to make the trash he found into more than just lazily bobbing reminders of intractability.
“I simply couldn’t believe the state this area was in,” Underwood told WIRED by email. “Garbage littered the shoreline, a pungent smell filled the air and signs about the polluted waters stood in confirmation of its degraded state. Hidden from view, I felt something had to be done to bring attention to this beach … it struck me for the first time that taking only a picture was not enough. ”

 (via Monuments Made of Trash Remind Us to Treat Earth More Kindly | Raw File | WIRED)

Jeremy Underwood’s ongoing photo series Human Debris repurposes found trash into site-specific sculptures.

Municipal waterways often double as highways for garbage—a well-known and highly visible problem with no obvious solution. So when photographer Jeremy Underwood stumbled across an especially polluted beach in Houston, he decided to make the trash he found into more than just lazily bobbing reminders of intractability.

“I simply couldn’t believe the state this area was in,” Underwood told WIRED by email. “Garbage littered the shoreline, a pungent smell filled the air and signs about the polluted waters stood in confirmation of its degraded state. Hidden from view, I felt something had to be done to bring attention to this beach … it struck me for the first time that taking only a picture was not enough. ”

 (via Monuments Made of Trash Remind Us to Treat Earth More Kindly | Raw File | WIRED)

8:49 am - Sat, Apr 5, 2014
488 notes
Plastic bottle caps = art. 
These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here. 
See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.
(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

Plastic bottle caps = art.

These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here

See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.

(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

1:06 pm - Wed, Apr 2, 2014
2,071 notes

worldcafe:

Ever wonder what to do with old CDs?  A town in Bulgaria made them into public art.  More pictures and the story on Slate.

Upcycling used/unwanted/outdated CDs (6,000, in this case!) into works of art always is an interesting reuse. More examples of that, plus other new uses for CDs, in earlier Unconsumption posts here

(via npr)

7:38 am - Mon, Mar 24, 2014
404 notes
Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art: 
"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 
The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.
(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art:

"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 

The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.

(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

4:41 pm - Fri, Mar 21, 2014
111 notes

At last, it’s wine o’clock again, which means it time to share an adult beverage-related repurposing find!

Today’s find, via Randy & Meg’s Garden Paradise, is bottle trees. (Or would you say they’re flowers?) 

Earlier posts in Unconsumption/s wine o’clock series can be found here; the bottle tree subset: here

3:41 pm - Mon, Dec 30, 2013
233 notes

In one of his most ambitious book sculptures to date artist Guy Laramée (previously here and here) created an homage to the printed Encyclopedia Britannica by transforming a 24-volume set into a sloping mountainous landscape. Titled Adieu, Laramée says the work was inspired in part by Encyclopedia Britannica’s announcement that after 244 years the would cease printing its iconic multi-volume book sets.

(via Artist Guy Laramée Carves a Mountainous Landscape from an Encyclopedia Britannica Set | Colossal)

In one of his most ambitious book sculptures to date artist Guy Laramée (previously here and here) created an homage to the printed Encyclopedia Britannica by transforming a 24-volume set into a sloping mountainous landscape. Titled Adieu, Laramée says the work was inspired in part by Encyclopedia Britannica’s announcement that after 244 years the would cease printing its iconic multi-volume book sets.

(via Artist Guy Laramée Carves a Mountainous Landscape from an Encyclopedia Britannica Set | Colossal)

3:40 pm - Sat, Dec 14, 2013
186 notes

And you thought breaking down your Amazon boxes for recycling was creative—Japanese gamer and amateur modeler Upuaza Touryou just trashed the competition, turning his stack of old flimsy cardboard into an insanely elaborate Buddhist temple.

More: Elaborate Buddhist Temple Made From Discarded Amazon Boxes

And you thought breaking down your Amazon boxes for recycling was creative—Japanese gamer and amateur modeler Upuaza Touryou just trashed the competition, turning his stack of old flimsy cardboard into an insanely elaborate Buddhist temple.

More: Elaborate Buddhist Temple Made From Discarded Amazon Boxes

3:40 pm - Tue, Nov 12, 2013
558 notes

junkculture:

Recycled Animal Sculptures by Dean Patman

via [Lustik]

12:20 pm - Thu, Oct 31, 2013
183 notes

Korean artist / sculpture  Yong Ho Ji is one of the most enterprising contemporary artists you ever likely to encounter. Much like Francisco de Pajaro, he also sees beauty where few others do. Educated in Fine Arts in New York and Seoul, he’s put his theory and love of sculpture into practice with truly stunning effect.
Using tons of discarded rubber tyres (which usually would be burnt causing a damaging effect on the environment) he transforms them into an eclectic collection of animal sculptures. It might be a giant rhinoceros, a lackadaisical hammerhead shark, brooding goat or even a raging bull – yet all are meticulously crafted and brought to life using only rubber strips of tyres. 

More: Amazing Animal Sculptures Made From Old Tyres | So Bad So Good

Korean artist / sculpture  Yong Ho Ji is one of the most enterprising contemporary artists you ever likely to encounter. Much like Francisco de Pajaro, he also sees beauty where few others do. Educated in Fine Arts in New York and Seoul, he’s put his theory and love of sculpture into practice with truly stunning effect.

Using tons of discarded rubber tyres (which usually would be burnt causing a damaging effect on the environment) he transforms them into an eclectic collection of animal sculptures. It might be a giant rhinoceros, a lackadaisical hammerhead shark, brooding goat or even a raging bull – yet all are meticulously crafted and brought to life using only rubber strips of tyres. 

More: Amazing Animal Sculptures Made From Old Tyres | So Bad So Good

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