Posts tagged Sculpture
8:49 am - Sat, Apr 5, 2014
411 notes
Plastic bottle caps = art. 
These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here. 
See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.
(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

Plastic bottle caps = art.

These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here

See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.

(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

1:06 pm - Wed, Apr 2, 2014
1,842 notes

worldcafe:

Ever wonder what to do with old CDs?  A town in Bulgaria made them into public art.  More pictures and the story on Slate.

Upcycling used/unwanted/outdated CDs (6,000, in this case!) into works of art always is an interesting reuse. More examples of that, plus other new uses for CDs, in earlier Unconsumption posts here

(via npr)

7:38 am - Mon, Mar 24, 2014
393 notes
Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art: 
"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 
The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.
(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art:

"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 

The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.

(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

4:41 pm - Fri, Mar 21, 2014
106 notes

At last, it’s wine o’clock again, which means it time to share an adult beverage-related repurposing find!

Today’s find, via Randy & Meg’s Garden Paradise, is bottle trees. (Or would you say they’re flowers?) 

Earlier posts in Unconsumption/s wine o’clock series can be found here; the bottle tree subset: here

3:41 pm - Mon, Dec 30, 2013
234 notes

In one of his most ambitious book sculptures to date artist Guy Laramée (previously here and here) created an homage to the printed Encyclopedia Britannica by transforming a 24-volume set into a sloping mountainous landscape. Titled Adieu, Laramée says the work was inspired in part by Encyclopedia Britannica’s announcement that after 244 years the would cease printing its iconic multi-volume book sets.

(via Artist Guy Laramée Carves a Mountainous Landscape from an Encyclopedia Britannica Set | Colossal)

In one of his most ambitious book sculptures to date artist Guy Laramée (previously here and here) created an homage to the printed Encyclopedia Britannica by transforming a 24-volume set into a sloping mountainous landscape. Titled Adieu, Laramée says the work was inspired in part by Encyclopedia Britannica’s announcement that after 244 years the would cease printing its iconic multi-volume book sets.

(via Artist Guy Laramée Carves a Mountainous Landscape from an Encyclopedia Britannica Set | Colossal)

3:40 pm - Sat, Dec 14, 2013
186 notes

And you thought breaking down your Amazon boxes for recycling was creative—Japanese gamer and amateur modeler Upuaza Touryou just trashed the competition, turning his stack of old flimsy cardboard into an insanely elaborate Buddhist temple.

More: Elaborate Buddhist Temple Made From Discarded Amazon Boxes

And you thought breaking down your Amazon boxes for recycling was creative—Japanese gamer and amateur modeler Upuaza Touryou just trashed the competition, turning his stack of old flimsy cardboard into an insanely elaborate Buddhist temple.

More: Elaborate Buddhist Temple Made From Discarded Amazon Boxes

3:40 pm - Tue, Nov 12, 2013
556 notes

junkculture:

Recycled Animal Sculptures by Dean Patman

via [Lustik]

12:20 pm - Thu, Oct 31, 2013
181 notes

Korean artist / sculpture  Yong Ho Ji is one of the most enterprising contemporary artists you ever likely to encounter. Much like Francisco de Pajaro, he also sees beauty where few others do. Educated in Fine Arts in New York and Seoul, he’s put his theory and love of sculpture into practice with truly stunning effect.
Using tons of discarded rubber tyres (which usually would be burnt causing a damaging effect on the environment) he transforms them into an eclectic collection of animal sculptures. It might be a giant rhinoceros, a lackadaisical hammerhead shark, brooding goat or even a raging bull – yet all are meticulously crafted and brought to life using only rubber strips of tyres. 

More: Amazing Animal Sculptures Made From Old Tyres | So Bad So Good

Korean artist / sculpture  Yong Ho Ji is one of the most enterprising contemporary artists you ever likely to encounter. Much like Francisco de Pajaro, he also sees beauty where few others do. Educated in Fine Arts in New York and Seoul, he’s put his theory and love of sculpture into practice with truly stunning effect.

Using tons of discarded rubber tyres (which usually would be burnt causing a damaging effect on the environment) he transforms them into an eclectic collection of animal sculptures. It might be a giant rhinoceros, a lackadaisical hammerhead shark, brooding goat or even a raging bull – yet all are meticulously crafted and brought to life using only rubber strips of tyres. 

More: Amazing Animal Sculptures Made From Old Tyres | So Bad So Good

12:20 pm - Fri, Oct 18, 2013
1,094 notes

junkculture:

Inspired by tramp art, Nashville-based artist Alex Lockwood creates intricate sculptures using discarded scratch-off lottery tickets found on street corners and outside of neighborhood bodegas. 
Lockwood folds and bends each ticket to fit like a puzzle, resulting in stunning multi-colored patterns. Each piece includes an impressive 800 to 1,500 folded tickets. “All of those colors are attractive for a reason.
They are designed to catch your eye.” he says, “The colors in my pieces work really well because the material I am using was made to draw you in and seduce you”
12:20 pm - Mon, Sep 30, 2013
238 notes

Japanese artist satoshi hirose created the sculptural work ‘island’ … formed from plastic — a heap comprised of caps from the recyclable tops of plastic bottles gathered by the artist over the course of nine years. 

via plastic bottle cap art by satoshi hirose)

Japanese artist satoshi hirose created the sculptural work ‘island’ … formed from plastic — a heap comprised of caps from the recyclable tops of plastic bottles gathered by the artist over the course of nine years.

via plastic bottle cap art by satoshi hirose)

10:00 am - Wed, Sep 4, 2013
392 notes

junkculture:

Japanese artist Natsumi Tomita utilises scraps of materials collected from the streets to create extremely imaginative animal sculptures that share an uncanny resemblance with their real-life counterparts.
Speaking about her work she says, “Each of these things, which we usually use everyday, once had a story, until they were thrown away. There are bicycles that were once ridden, broken dustpans, signboards from loan sharks, lost umbrellas. Every object had purpose and meaning before they were tossed away. Taking these things that I collect, I connect them and create new life from them.”
11:30 am - Wed, Jul 10, 2013
100 notes

Returning to Governors Island for its third year, The FIGMENT TreeHouse has evolved from the little project that could into a center piece of the annual FIGMENT NYCN event and a centerpiece of the Summer-Long FIGMENT Interactive Sculpture Garden.
Started in 2011 as an experiment in sustainability and reclaimed materials, the TreeHouse continues to show that not all sustainable design has to be serious or stuffy. TreeHouse is created entirely from reclaimed materials supplied by the streets of Brooklyn and project partners Build It Green! NYC and (as of 2013) Materials for the Arts.
The TreeHouse is a playground for all ages. … This year, TreeHouse comes with a new addition, the Gazebo, where participants are invited to explore the interactive elements within.

More: TreeHouse – FIGMENT New York)
Via PSFK.

Returning to Governors Island for its third year, The FIGMENT TreeHouse has evolved from the little project that could into a center piece of the annual FIGMENT NYCN event and a centerpiece of the Summer-Long FIGMENT Interactive Sculpture Garden.

Started in 2011 as an experiment in sustainability and reclaimed materials, the TreeHouse continues to show that not all sustainable design has to be serious or stuffy. TreeHouse is created entirely from reclaimed materials supplied by the streets of Brooklyn and project partners Build It Green! NYC and (as of 2013) Materials for the Arts.

The TreeHouse is a playground for all ages. … This year, TreeHouse comes with a new addition, the Gazebo, where participants are invited to explore the interactive elements within.

More: TreeHouse – FIGMENT New York)

Via PSFK.

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