Posts tagged Los Angeles
7:22 pm - Thu, Apr 4, 2013
581 notes
Cup of tea, anyone?
Some 3,000 tea bags (yes, you read that right!) make up this installation at Rolling Greens, a “home and garden destination” in Los Angeles. (Spotted on Pinterest here. Source: Los Angeles, I’m Yours, which features additional photos.) 
See also: Quilt made from steeped tea bags. 
How would you describe this example of repurposing? Beautiful? Or not your cup of tea?

Cup of tea, anyone?

Some 3,000 tea bags (yes, you read that right!) make up this installation at Rolling Greens, a “home and garden destination” in Los Angeles. (Spotted on Pinterest here. Source: Los Angeles, I’m Yours, which features additional photos.) 

See also: Quilt made from steeped tea bags

How would you describe this example of repurposing? Beautiful? Or not your cup of tea?

4:44 pm - Sat, Nov 3, 2012
36 notes

California’s generous recycling redemption program has led to rampant fraud. Crafty entrepreneurs are driving semi-trailers full of cans from Nevada or Arizona, which don’t have deposit laws, across the border and transforming their cargo into truckfuls of nickels. In addition, recyclers inside the state are claiming redemptions for the same containers several times over, or for containers that never existed.

The illicit trade is draining the state’s $1.1-billion recycling fund. Government officials recently estimated the fraud at $40 million a year, and an industry expert said it could exceed $200 million.

Via Freakonomics

5:23 pm - Wed, May 23, 2012
109 notes

Los Angeles became the largest city in the nation Wednesday to approve a ban on plastic bags at supermarket checkout lines, handing a major victory to clean-water advocates who sought to reduce the amount of trash clogging landfills, the region’s waterways and the ocean.

Egged on by actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus and an array of environmental groups, the City Council voted 13 to 1 to phase out plastic bags over the next 12 months at an estimated 7,500 stores. Councilman Bernard Parks cast the lone no vote.

"Let’s get the message to Sacramento that it’s time to go statewide," said Councilman Ed Reyes, who has focused on efforts to revitalize the Los Angeles River.

Read the rest: LATimes

Previous bag-ban coverage here

12:17 pm - Tue, Feb 21, 2012
59 notes
Reclaimed bus yard begins life as a park and urban wetland

It took three years and more than $26 million to turn an old MTA bus yard in South Los Angeles into what it is today: a sprawling [nine-acre] park and urban wetland that will store and clean millions of gallons of storm water — while also giving children a place to play.
Residents say it is a welcome addition to a neighborhood that is sorely in need of green space.
City officials say decades of lax zoning practices have left many of the area’s residential streets blighted with warehouses, mechanic shops and scrap yards. The new park replaces one of those industrial islands with a novel feat of urban landscape design.
Unlike most parks, which feature green lawns and picnic tables, this one is composed of walking paths, native plants and several kidney-shaped pools filled with storm water. Naturally occurring bacteria clean pollutants from the water, which eventually feeds into a storm drain.

(via latimes.com)

Reclaimed bus yard begins life as a park and urban wetland

It took three years and more than $26 million to turn an old MTA bus yard in South Los Angeles into what it is today: a sprawling [nine-acre] park and urban wetland that will store and clean millions of gallons of storm water — while also giving children a place to play.

Residents say it is a welcome addition to a neighborhood that is sorely in need of green space.

City officials say decades of lax zoning practices have left many of the area’s residential streets blighted with warehouses, mechanic shops and scrap yards. The new park replaces one of those industrial islands with a novel feat of urban landscape design.

Unlike most parks, which feature green lawns and picnic tables, this one is composed of walking paths, native plants and several kidney-shaped pools filled with storm water. Naturally occurring bacteria clean pollutants from the water, which eventually feeds into a storm drain.

(via latimes.com)

9:26 am - Tue, Nov 22, 2011
28 notes

While working with clients in Los Angeles, professional organizer Beth Zeigler of Bneato unearthed many a cache of reusable bags, often given away free as promotional items, that had been shoved into cabinets and closets and were gathering dust. At the same time, she knew there were still plenty of grocery stores where you could see “people carrying one or two items out in a plastic bag,” as she told The Atlantic Cities blog.
Zeigler organized a chain of drop-off locations — yoga studios, record shops, restaurants — where the bag-rich could unburden themselves. Over two months, she collected approximately 1,800 to 1,900 reusable bags from clients, friends, and the community. [Earlier this month] … in a small act of wealth redistribution, she and her cohorts handed out nearly all of them at two local grocery stores to people who weren’t already using reusable bags.
Along with the bags, Zeigler distributed tip sheets in English and Spanish with suggestions for ways to “keep your reusable bags organized and on-hand so you will always have them when you need them” — thus avoiding the temptation to snap up another bag at the store and start the clutter-creation cycle all over again. 

(via TreeHugger)

While working with clients in Los Angeles, professional organizer Beth Zeigler of Bneato unearthed many a cache of reusable bags, often given away free as promotional items, that had been shoved into cabinets and closets and were gathering dust. At the same time, she knew there were still plenty of grocery stores where you could see “people carrying one or two items out in a plastic bag,” as she told The Atlantic Cities blog.

Zeigler organized a chain of drop-off locations — yoga studios, record shops, restaurants — where the bag-rich could unburden themselves. Over two months, she collected approximately 1,800 to 1,900 reusable bags from clients, friends, and the community. [Earlier this month] … in a small act of wealth redistribution, she and her cohorts handed out nearly all of them at two local grocery stores to people who weren’t already using reusable bags.

Along with the bags, Zeigler distributed tip sheets in English and Spanish with suggestions for ways to “keep your reusable bags organized and on-hand so you will always have them when you need them” — thus avoiding the temptation to snap up another bag at the store and start the clutter-creation cycle all over again. 

(via TreeHugger)

8:04 pm - Thu, Sep 8, 2011
59 notes

Hoping to reduce the billions of grocery bags circulating throughout the city, an L.A. councilman Tuesday called for a sweeping ban on single-use paper and plastic bags.

By including paper bags in the ban, the proposal goes beyond similar measures taken recently by other California cities and counties. Although L.A. County, Santa Monica and other municipalities have banned plastic bags in recent years, most have allowed stores to sell paper ones for a small fee.

"With paper bags, you’re still generating litter," said Councilman Paul Koretz, who introduced the motion proposing the ban. "We’re taking the next step."

Environmentalists celebrated the news and said they hoped that it would push Sacramento lawmakers to enact a statewide ban.

Under the L.A. proposal, stores would be permitted to give away or sell only reusable tote bags, or risk a fine. An exemption would be made for small plastic bags meant to keep raw vegetables and meats separated from other groceries to prevent cross-contamination. 

The City Council’s Energy and Environment Committee will decide whether to move forward with the proposed ban.

Related: Earlier Unconsumption posts on other plastic-ban ordinances.

2:11 pm - Mon, Jun 27, 2011
19 notes
Palletecture — pallets repurposed as building material
We’ve seen wooden pallets repurposed for many uses. Reuse as furniture and shelving seems to be more common than use for architectural applications — palletecture, as many of us like to call it — though we’ve seen a variety of examples of that. 
Here’s another palletecture example (via Designwatcher) to add to the list:
Salvaged pallets help to filter light into bedding-maker Matteo’s outlet in Los Angeles. Inside the store, pallet wood lines the walls and is used as display fixtures. (Click on the photo above to see an interior shot of the store.)
What do you think? Are you a fan of the rustic look? 

Palletecture — pallets repurposed as building material

We’ve seen wooden pallets repurposed for many uses. Reuse as furniture and shelving seems to be more common than use for architectural applications — palletecture, as many of us like to call it — though we’ve seen a variety of examples of that. 

Here’s another palletecture example (via Designwatcher) to add to the list:

Salvaged pallets help to filter light into bedding-maker Matteo’s outlet in Los Angeles. Inside the store, pallet wood lines the walls and is used as display fixtures. (Click on the photo above to see an interior shot of the store.)

What do you think? Are you a fan of the rustic look? 

4:45 pm - Sat, Jan 15, 2011
11 notes
Mosaic madness!

Jolino Beserra is a master mosaic artist. David Edward Byrd created posters for Jimi Hendrix, the Who, the Grateful Dead and the Woodstock music festival. Together they recently finished turning a jumble of broken ceramics, found objects and personal treasures into a mosaic of a home that’s at once beautiful and entertaining. A collection of 1930s and ’40s salt and pepper shakers is embedded in the fireplace. Monkeys hear, see and speak no evil from the kitchen backsplash. Ceramic fish fly out of an outdoor shower.

Click through to see R. Daniel Foster’s 15-image photo gallery. (via Home Tour: L.A. artists and their mosaic madness | L.A. at Home | Los Angeles Times)

Mosaic madness!

Jolino Beserra is a master mosaic artist. David Edward Byrd created posters for Jimi Hendrix, the Who, the Grateful Dead and the Woodstock music festival. Together they recently finished turning a jumble of broken ceramics, found objects and personal treasures into a mosaic of a home that’s at once beautiful and entertaining. A collection of 1930s and ’40s salt and pepper shakers is embedded in the fireplace. Monkeys hear, see and speak no evil from the kitchen backsplash. Ceramic fish fly out of an outdoor shower.

Click through to see R. Daniel Foster’s 15-image photo gallery. (via Home Tour: L.A. artists and their mosaic madness | L.A. at Home | Los Angeles Times)

7:01 pm - Fri, Jan 14, 2011
36 notes

On a cold Saturday a few weeks ago, [Venice High School’s “learning garden”] garden master David King hosted the first meeting of the Seed Library of Los Angeles, believed to be L.A.’s first regional seed bank. For the $10 membership fee, gardeners can “borrow” the seeds of specific edibles — heirloom Waltham 29 broccoli, for example. Part of the resulting crop must then be allowed to flower and go to seed, allowing the borrower to return fresh seed stock to the library.
"As seeds grow out repeatedly in our soil and microclimates, they adapt," says King. (via Venice High’s Learning Garden, a locavore’s delight | Los Angeles Times)

Related: Unconsumption post about the Richmond Grows Seed Lending Library in Richmond, California.

On a cold Saturday a few weeks ago, [Venice High School’s “learning garden”] garden master David King hosted the first meeting of the Seed Library of Los Angeles, believed to be L.A.’s first regional seed bank. For the $10 membership fee, gardeners can “borrow” the seeds of specific edibles — heirloom Waltham 29 broccoli, for example. Part of the resulting crop must then be allowed to flower and go to seed, allowing the borrower to return fresh seed stock to the library.

"As seeds grow out repeatedly in our soil and microclimates, they adapt," says King. (via Venice High’s Learning Garden, a locavore’s delight | Los Angeles Times)

Related: Unconsumption post about the Richmond Grows Seed Lending Library in Richmond, California.

7:18 pm - Tue, Nov 16, 2010
7 notes

Los Angeles County’s ordinance, which goes into effect next year, will require grocery and convenience stores to charge 10 cents for each paper bag, giving consumers even greater incentive to use reusable cloth bags. While the single-use bag ban doesn’t apply to 88 cities within the county, including Los Angeles, it will affect unincorporated areas where an estimated 1.1 million residents live. Proponents hope the county’s move will spur other cities to adopt similar measures. 

5:17 pm - Tue, Jun 29, 2010
119 notes
Via halfletterpress:

The Highland Park Book Booth « 90042
reclaiming unused phone booths for book swap!


Related, via Murketing: Bücher-Zelle (Book Cell)

Via halfletterpress:

The Highland Park Book Booth « 90042

reclaiming unused phone booths for book swap!

Related, via MurketingBücher-Zelle (Book Cell)

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