Posts tagged DIY
8:49 am - Sat, Apr 5, 2014
361 notes
Plastic bottle caps = art. 
These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here. 
See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.
(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

Plastic bottle caps = art.

These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here

See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.

(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

7:20 pm - Wed, Mar 26, 2014
131 notes
An old boat used as a sandbox? Gotta say I like this reuse idea. 
(Stating the obvious, but still: Be mindful of old things that may have lead-based paint on ‘em. If you do a little research, you probably can find a low-VOC, plant- or water-based product to apply as a finish on wood items.) 
Photo: via Desire Empire

An old boat used as a sandbox? Gotta say I like this reuse idea. 

(Stating the obvious, but still: Be mindful of old things that may have lead-based paint on ‘em. If you do a little research, you probably can find a low-VOC, plant- or water-based product to apply as a finish on wood items.) 

Photo: via Desire Empire

5:44 pm - Sun, Mar 23, 2014
123,281 notes
thiscityslungs:

"Diction-fairy"

Cuteness level: Very high. 

thiscityslungs:

"Diction-fairy"

Cuteness level: Very high. 

7:39 am - Thu, Mar 20, 2014
802 notes
Spring project idea: Make your own outdoor seating … 
Every so often, I not only look at Pinterest, but I actually find a pin showcasing a project I’d like to learn more about.
One such example was this DIY outdoor seating project that uses pre-owned cushions, a dozen concrete block units, and four fence posts. Intrigued, I clicked through the pin and found a simple tutorial.
If you’d like to make something like this but don’t already have all the materials, have a look at Freecycle to see if someone in your area has some thing(s) you could use. A home-improvement reuse store — such as a Habitat for Humanity ReStore — in your community may have useful items. (For Habitat ReStore locations, look here.)
Photo via Lena Sekine, who made the sofa that’s pictured using a tutorial via the Kayla’s Basement blog here.
I’ve long since closed Pinterest, and don’t recall whose Pinterest “outdoor seating” pin I originally saw, but, well, thanks, Internet! 
BTW, Unconsumption’s on Pinterest: here. 

Spring project idea: Make your own outdoor seating … 

Every so often, I not only look at Pinterest, but I actually find a pin showcasing a project I’d like to learn more about.

One such example was this DIY outdoor seating project that uses pre-owned cushions, a dozen concrete block units, and four fence posts. Intrigued, I clicked through the pin and found a simple tutorial.

If you’d like to make something like this but don’t already have all the materials, have a look at Freecycle to see if someone in your area has some thing(s) you could use. A home-improvement reuse store — such as a Habitat for Humanity ReStore — in your community may have useful items. (For Habitat ReStore locations, look here.)

Photo via Lena Sekine, who made the sofa that’s pictured using a tutorial via the Kayla’s Basement blog here.

I’ve long since closed Pinterest, and don’t recall whose Pinterest “outdoor seating” pin I originally saw, but, well, thanks, Internet! 

BTW, Unconsumption’s on Pinterest: here

3:52 pm - Fri, Mar 14, 2014
885 notes
Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 
I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!
This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.
(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock) 
Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here. 

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 

I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!

This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.

(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock

Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here

7:24 am - Mon, Mar 10, 2014
375 notes
Cross-file under: ”Creative reuse of an old clamp” and “vertical storage.” 
(via Diagnosis: Interior Mania)

Cross-file under: ”Creative reuse of an old clamp” and “vertical storage.” 

(via Diagnosis: Interior Mania)

3:40 pm - Fri, Feb 21, 2014
139 notes
Make your own lip balm!
Here: How-Tuesday: DIY Lip Balm in Upcycled Containers | The Etsy Blog
9:20 pm - Wed, Oct 9, 2013
155 notes
mollyblock:

Jeans repurposed as planters — awesome sight to see in San Francisco. ❤ 

mollyblock:

Jeans repurposed as planters — awesome sight to see in San Francisco. ❤ 

(via gardensinunexpectedplaces)

10:53 am - Thu, Aug 15, 2013
224 notes
In today’s GOOD NEWS: I salvaged a vintage globe and turned it into a lampshade!  
The globe’s owner — my aunt — tried for years to repair the decades-old globe (which had split apart and would no longer stand upright on its bent, rusted metal base). Last month, while visiting my aunt, I spotted the globe on top of her trash bin, grabbed it, and said we could find a way to reuse it. :)
Note: My lamp’s harp — the metal part that curves around the light bulb and onto which the shade gets screwed into place — is tall, leaving almost two inches of air space above the bulb. Stating the obvious, but still: When using a globe or other non-traditional item as a lamp shade, be sure there’s some open space around the bulb so the top of the lamp won’t get too hot. Also, as many of you know, using compact florescent lighbulbs (CFLs), which I use on this lamp and on others, can help reduce lamps’ heat output.
For earlier Unconsumption posts on other new uses for old globes and maps, see our Tumblr archive here, and Pinterest board here. 

In today’s GOOD NEWS: I salvaged a vintage globe and turned it into a lampshade!  

The globe’s owner — my aunt — tried for years to repair the decades-old globe (which had split apart and would no longer stand upright on its bent, rusted metal base). Last month, while visiting my aunt, I spotted the globe on top of her trash bin, grabbed it, and said we could find a way to reuse it. :)

Note: My lamp’s harp — the metal part that curves around the light bulb and onto which the shade gets screwed into place — is tall, leaving almost two inches of air space above the bulb. Stating the obvious, but still: When using a globe or other non-traditional item as a lamp shade, be sure there’s some open space around the bulb so the top of the lamp won’t get too hot. Also, as many of you know, using compact florescent lighbulbs (CFLs), which I use on this lamp and on others, can help reduce lamps’ heat output.

For earlier Unconsumption posts on other new uses for old globes and maps, see our Tumblr archive here, and Pinterest board here

6:22 pm - Thu, Jul 25, 2013
140 notes
Repurposing that involves both pallets and wine? Yes, right here!
Turn an old pallet made into a wine rack:

The project isn’t too complicated; basically you’re cutting off a section of the pallet to hold the wine, and adding some u-shaped glass holders underneath. You’ll need a jigsaw and some other tools, but it’s pretty much Shop Class 101. The final product should hold at least five bottles of wine comfortably, and dangle your glasses attractively below for easy access during dinner parties.

For DIY details, see this Lifehacker post.

Repurposing that involves both pallets and wine? Yes, right here!

Turn an old pallet made into a wine rack:

The project isn’t too complicated; basically you’re cutting off a section of the pallet to hold the wine, and adding some u-shaped glass holders underneath. You’ll need a jigsaw and some other tools, but it’s pretty much Shop Class 101. The final product should hold at least five bottles of wine comfortably, and dangle your glasses attractively below for easy access during dinner parties.

For DIY details, see this Lifehacker post.

5:46 pm - Tue, Jul 16, 2013
130 notes
DIY project du jour:
Why not turn an old window screen into a reusable tote bag?
For how-to details: Check out the Between the lines blog’s mesh bag tutorial. 
Omitting the pouch part and/or using a piece of cardboard as the bag’s removable bottom could simplify things. For the straps, maybe use an old belt?

DIY project du jour:

Why not turn an old window screen into a reusable tote bag?

For how-to details: Check out the Between the lines blog’s mesh bag tutorial

Omitting the pouch part and/or using a piece of cardboard as the bag’s removable bottom could simplify things. For the straps, maybe use an old belt?

12:20 pm - Thu, Jun 20, 2013
68 notes
BoingBoing reports:

The Restart Project is a London-based social enterprise and charity aiming at changing our relationship with information technologies by empowering people to repair and reuse their electronic devices.
The Restart Project’s vision is one based on collaboration and creativity — combining online knowledge sharing and cooperation with tangible activities in real life.
One of the main such activity have been ‘Restart Parties’, community repair events, where all kinds of electronics are taken apart and repaired by owners together with volunteer repairers (Restarters).

More about The Restart Project here: the restart project | repair, don’t despair! towards a better relationship with electronics

BoingBoing reports:

The Restart Project is a London-based social enterprise and charity aiming at changing our relationship with information technologies by empowering people to repair and reuse their electronic devices.

The Restart Project’s vision is one based on collaboration and creativity — combining online knowledge sharing and cooperation with tangible activities in real life.

One of the main such activity have been ‘Restart Parties’, community repair events, where all kinds of electronics are taken apart and repaired by owners together with volunteer repairers (Restarters).

More about The Restart Project here: the restart project | repair, don’t despair! towards a better relationship with electronics

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