Posts tagged Christmas tree
5:00 pm - Tue, Dec 20, 2011
26 notes

If you’re decorating a small space or looking for less flashy holiday centerpiece options, this cardboard Christmas tree photo tutorial from Craftberry Bush is for you! Cardboard is always a great low-cost  decorating option, and these trees would add the perfect amount of  sparkle to any table, itty bitty apartment, or dorm room!

More: How-To: Cardboard Christmas Tree @Craftzine.com blog
Craftberry Bush projects also mentioned in this earlier Unconsumption post.

If you’re decorating a small space or looking for less flashy holiday centerpiece options, this cardboard Christmas tree photo tutorial from Craftberry Bush is for you! Cardboard is always a great low-cost decorating option, and these trees would add the perfect amount of sparkle to any table, itty bitty apartment, or dorm room!

More: How-To: Cardboard Christmas Tree @Craftzine.com blog

Craftberry Bush projects also mentioned in this earlier Unconsumption post.

9:14 am
31 notes

Create your own Makedo Christmas tree these holidays. All you have to do  is download the template file available here on instructables and go to  mymakedo.com for a Makedo KIT for THREE.

I read the above passage (on Instructables, here: Makedo Christmas tree) and said: “Cool! … What?”
What I mean is: This cardboard-box tree looks appealing, but what is “a Makedo KIT for THREE”?
Here is what I found:

Open ended creativity: Makedo’s family-sized set of award winning connectors: Turn cardboard boxes, paper cups, plastic bottles, lids and other household packaging into amazing recycled artworks with the Makedo Freeplay set of connectors.
Makedo’s Freeplay Kit provides all the tools and reusable connectors to build your own masterpiece. Kit for Three is the perfect family sized set with plenty of parts to make 7-8 smaller creations or 1-2 that are really big. You decide.
This kit includes two plastic safe-saws for punching holes in thick cardboard or plastic and cutting it down to size; and the clever re-clips and lock-hinges let you connect materials together quickly and easily. Makedo parts are  reusable so next time create something totally different. And then do  it all again.

I wasn’t familiar with Makedo, but its offerings sound like a potentially helpful way of converting all kinds of secondary materials into amusing new items — not just for the holidays.

Create your own Makedo Christmas tree these holidays. All you have to do is download the template file available here on instructables and go to mymakedo.com for a Makedo KIT for THREE.

I read the above passage (on Instructables, here: Makedo Christmas tree) and said: “Cool! … What?”

What I mean is: This cardboard-box tree looks appealing, but what is “a Makedo KIT for THREE”?

Here is what I found:

Open ended creativity: Makedo’s family-sized set of award winning connectors: Turn cardboard boxes, paper cups, plastic bottles, lids and other household packaging into amazing recycled artworks with the Makedo Freeplay set of connectors.

Makedo’s Freeplay Kit provides all the tools and reusable connectors to build your own masterpiece. Kit for Three is the perfect family sized set with plenty of parts to make 7-8 smaller creations or 1-2 that are really big. You decide.

This kit includes two plastic safe-saws for punching holes in thick cardboard or plastic and cutting it down to size; and the clever re-clips and lock-hinges let you connect materials together quickly and easily. Makedo parts are reusable so next time create something totally different. And then do it all again.

I wasn’t familiar with Makedo, but its offerings sound like a potentially helpful way of converting all kinds of secondary materials into amusing new items — not just for the holidays.


6:01 am
31 notes
Another Unconsumption Christmas tree, this one made from recycled Converse to promote Nike’s “Reuse-A-Shoe” program, which collects old shoes to grind down into playgrounds and game courts.
The Converse Tree is part of the holiday decorations at the Converse flagship store in SoHo.
Nike Reuse-A-Shoe

Another Unconsumption Christmas tree, this one made from recycled Converse to promote Nike’s “Reuse-A-Shoe” program, which collects old shoes to grind down into playgrounds and game courts.

The Converse Tree is part of the holiday decorations at the Converse flagship store in SoHo.

Nike Reuse-A-Shoe

3:41 pm - Sun, Dec 18, 2011
41 notes
In Maine: Lobster trap Christmas trees
To make this year’s 60-foot-tall lobster trap tree, the residents of Beals Island and Jonesport, Maine, gathered, stacked, and rigged with lights an astounding number of lobster traps — 1,364 used lobster traps.
Other towns, including Gloucester and Rockland, whose tree is pictured below, have built their own “trees,” though some use new lobster traps or crates. [Side note: Rockland’s tree is listed on Foursquare with its own check-in spot (here).]

(Info and top photo via Lobster trap Christmas trees spur friendly competition between towns — Bangor Daily News. Rockland tree photo via the Interactive Inns blog. For another story about New England’s lobster trap trees, see NYTimes.com.)
See also: Earlier Unconsumption Christmas tree-related posts here.

In Maine: Lobster trap Christmas trees

To make this year’s 60-foot-tall lobster trap tree, the residents of Beals Island and Jonesport, Maine, gathered, stacked, and rigged with lights an astounding number of lobster traps — 1,364 used lobster traps.

Other towns, including Gloucester and Rockland, whose tree is pictured below, have built their own “trees,” though some use new lobster traps or crates. [Side note: Rockland’s tree is listed on Foursquare with its own check-in spot (here).]

(Info and top photo via Lobster trap Christmas trees spur friendly competition between towns — Bangor Daily News. Rockland tree photo via the Interactive Inns blog. For another story about New England’s lobster trap trees, see NYTimes.com.)

See also: Earlier Unconsumption Christmas tree-related posts here.

12:17 pm - Fri, Dec 16, 2011
65 notes
Yes — a Christmas tree constructed from hubcaps!
(via Dude Craft)
Other Unconsumption-y Christmas tree-related items can be found here.

Yes — a Christmas tree constructed from hubcaps!

(via Dude Craft)

Other Unconsumption-y Christmas tree-related items can be found here.

4:56 pm - Thu, Dec 15, 2011
72 notes
Another waste-free Christmas tree!
Our friends at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco just shared with us a set of photos of their handsome 2011 book tree. The nine-foot-tall tree’s constructed from some 700 books — approximately 3,250 pounds’ worth. This year marks the third year that Gleeson Library’s had a book tree.
You might recall Gleeson Library’s Internet-famous 2010 tree, which we featured here last year and in this recent post on the spreading of the idea of building book trees. (A no-waste decorating trend involving books is a good trend in, ahem, my book.)
For additional photos of the 2011 Gleeson tree, see shawncalhoun’s set of photos on Flickr. (Thanks, Shawn, for the heads up!)

Another waste-free Christmas tree!

Our friends at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco just shared with us a set of photos of their handsome 2011 book tree. The nine-foot-tall tree’s constructed from some 700 books — approximately 3,250 pounds’ worth. This year marks the third year that Gleeson Library’s had a book tree.

You might recall Gleeson Library’s Internet-famous 2010 tree, which we featured here last year and in this recent post on the spreading of the idea of building book trees. (A no-waste decorating trend involving books is a good trend in, ahem, my book.)

For additional photos of the 2011 Gleeson tree, see shawncalhoun’s set of photos on Flickr. (Thanks, Shawn, for the heads up!)

5:11 pm - Wed, Dec 14, 2011
75 notes
More books = more Christmas trees
Okay, so I keep thinking that I won’t post other holiday-related items. And then I come across things that we haven’t shared here on Unconsumption, and I feel compelled to post them!
So, here we go: Four additional examples of trees made from books.
(“Tree” pictured above via Goose Hill. Thanks to Annie for pointing it out to me.)

(via The Blog on the Bookshelf)
If you aren’t too worried about your books’ bindings/spines, you could make something like this:

(via Aga Inés on Flickr)

(via Real Simple)
For other book tree examples, check out these earlier Unconsumption posts. Tabletop trees? Look here. Alternative Christmas trees, in general, and other holiday tree-related posts: here.

More books = more Christmas trees

Okay, so I keep thinking that I won’t post other holiday-related items. And then I come across things that we haven’t shared here on Unconsumption, and I feel compelled to post them!

So, here we go: Four additional examples of trees made from books.

(“Tree” pictured above via Goose Hill. Thanks to Annie for pointing it out to me.)

(via The Blog on the Bookshelf)

If you aren’t too worried about your books’ bindings/spines, you could make something like this:

(via Aga Inés on Flickr)

(via Real Simple)

For other book tree examples, check out these earlier Unconsumption posts. Tabletop trees? Look here. Alternative Christmas trees, in general, and other holiday tree-related posts: here.

5:08 pm
5,550 notes
nerdquirks:

Thanks to queenkimmie for this picture! 

I usually don’t reblog items that don’t link to a source or don’t give any kind of attribution whatsoever, but in this case, I’m making an exception so this book tree post will be added to the mighty Unconsumption alternative tree archive. (Anybody know the source of this tree/photo?)

nerdquirks:

Thanks to queenkimmie for this picture! 

I usually don’t reblog items that don’t link to a source or don’t give any kind of attribution whatsoever, but in this case, I’m making an exception so this book tree post will be added to the mighty Unconsumption alternative tree archive. (Anybody know the source of this tree/photo?)

(Source: , via fuckyeahupcycle)

8:36 am
124 notes
More books = more Christmas trees
To add to our post from last week about alternative Christmas trees constructed out of books, there’s this novel on-shelf “tree” made by Thatcher Wine and his colleagues at Juniper Books in Boulder (mentioned previously here and here).
Thirty olive-green law books, 24 of which were cut, comprise the eight-foot-tall tree. The books are substantial enough to stay upright on their own with no support placed behind them.
About the cutting/carving of books: Thatcher explains that there’s an abundant supply of law books, with law firms and university libraries no longer needing copies in print once they’ve digitized their holdings. He estimates that Juniper has repurposed some 10,000 law books this year, including thousands going to retailers and designers for “decoration and visual merchandising.” He adds that the cutting of two dozen books to make this display might have saved those unneeded books from a far worse fate!
(Via Christmas tree of books 2011 — JuniperBooks.com. Thanks, Thatcher!)

Related: Juniper Books’ 2010 tree made from 800 stacked books. 

More books = more Christmas trees

To add to our post from last week about alternative Christmas trees constructed out of books, there’s this novel on-shelf “tree” made by Thatcher Wine and his colleagues at Juniper Books in Boulder (mentioned previously here and here).

Thirty olive-green law books, 24 of which were cut, comprise the eight-foot-tall tree. The books are substantial enough to stay upright on their own with no support placed behind them.

About the cutting/carving of books: Thatcher explains that there’s an abundant supply of law books, with law firms and university libraries no longer needing copies in print once they’ve digitized their holdings. He estimates that Juniper has repurposed some 10,000 law books this year, including thousands going to retailers and designers for “decoration and visual merchandising.” He adds that the cutting of two dozen books to make this display might have saved those unneeded books from a far worse fate!

(Via Christmas tree of books 2011 — JuniperBooks.com. Thanks, Thatcher!)

Related: Juniper Books’ 2010 tree made from 800 stacked books. 

8:56 am - Mon, Dec 12, 2011
279 notes

mollyblock:

How-to: Make a “paper tree” in five easy steps

This project was inspired by two things: 1.) A neat “printed paper pine” item from Anthropologie, and 2.) my discovery, in the attic of my parents’ house, of an assortment of vintage sheet music — mainly trumpet and saxophone parts from the 1950s-1970s (that hadn’t been touched since the 1970s) when my father played in a band. 

Materials needed:

  • One chopstick
  • Something into which the chopstick can be anchored, like a scrap piece of wood, so the stick stands vertically (I upcycled an old plastic reel-to-reel tape spool as a base)
  • Several pages of printed sheet music, pages from a discarded book (or book you’ll no longer read), old holiday cards, or pages from magazines or catalogs
  • A piece of cardboard, roughly 1.5’x2’ in size 

Tools: 

  • Pinking shears, or something else that provides a decorative edge
  • Scissors
  • An ice pick, or other hole-punching device
  • Optional: Glue, small nail, hammer

Estimated time for completion: 

  • A couple of hours, though you probably can multi-task (read blogs, like I did, or watch TV) while working. 

Steps:

  1. Using pinking shears, or another cutting tool, cut the music (or other paper pieces) into squares. I cut my largest square approximately 5” x 5”, and smallest 1” x 1”. As I went along, I didn’t measure the pieces, but estimated the size based on that of the squares I’d just cut. For one tree, I used 40 paper squares. 
  2. Next, use scissors to cut the cardboard into small squares to add as spacers between the paper squares. The cardboard squares should be considerably smaller than the paper squares — that’ll help make the cardboard less visible. (I used a piece of recycled cardboard that held a case of cat food — it’s thinner and less rigid than some cardboard which made it easier to cut, I think.) Cut out the same number of cardboard squares as you have paper squares. 
  3. Poke holes in the center of the paper and cardboard squares. With an ice pick, I was able to punch holes through several squares at the same time. (Your mileage may vary.)
  4. Next, place your chopstick in whatever object you have handy to use as a base. You may want to nail or glue the chopstick into/onto your object. (I didn’t need to — my chopstick fits pretty snugly into my base.) 
  5. Now place the cardboard and paper squares onto the chopstick, pushing them down from the chopstick’s tapered end. Start with your largest square of cardboard, then add your largest piece of music on top of it. Continue stacking the cardboard and paper squares, keeping an eye on how your “tree” is shaping up. Hopefully, it’s a nice cone shape. 

As your layering of squares nears the top of the chopstick, stop at whatever point you want to. You could put a dot of glue on the topmost cardboard piece and paper square, to hold them in place. (I’d like to take the tree apart after the holidays — to store everything flat in a box — so I didn’t add glue.) Also, I left my chopstick top bare because I like the minimal look of it. You may want to “top” your tree with something.  

 That’s it. Place your tree on a table, and enjoy!  

Note: This project carries a stamp of approval from Veto, my feline quality control officer.

Yes, yours truly (Unconsumptioneer Molly) posted a tutorial for something I made. Hope it inspires you to make something of your own! 

2:27 pm - Sun, Dec 11, 2011
65 notes
And now we’re aware of another alternative Christmas “tree”: The Jack Daniel’s whiskey barrel tree — made from 140 barrels — in Lynchburg, Tennessee. 
(Spotted on Facebook via the Jack Daniel’s page.)
In case you missed it, our most recent post on alternative trees, including new “trees” made from books, plastic bottles, bicycle parts, and more, is here. 

And now we’re aware of another alternative Christmas “tree”: The Jack Daniel’s whiskey barrel tree — made from 140 barrels — in Lynchburg, Tennessee. 

(Spotted on Facebook via the Jack Daniel’s page.)

In case you missed it, our most recent post on alternative trees, including new “trees” made from books, plastic bottles, bicycle parts, and more, is here

9:21 am - Sat, Dec 10, 2011
111 notes
Books = Christmas trees
Do you remember our December 2010 post about a Christmas tree made from books at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco, or our post about this smaller book tree? Or perhaps you saw some mention last year of the book tree constructed by the folks at Juniper Books in Boulder?
Well, it looks like the book tree idea has caught on in other places. In Poland, librarians at the University Library of UWM (University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn), made the above-pictured tree from 1,600 books. (That’s a lot of copies of George Orwell’s 1984 and Joseph Heller’s Picture This!) Click here for details and here to view a Flickr stream showing 50+ shots of the tree, including several photos captured during the construction process, a how-to for others who want to build book trees.
And here’s a book tree located at the Inglewood Public Library, in the Los Angeles area.
Let us know if you spot other book trees elsewhere.
Related: Unconsumption posts about trees made from other non-traditional materials: shopping carts, bicycle parts, 40,000 plastic bottles, upside down tomato cages with strings of lights, wood scraps.

Books = Christmas trees

Do you remember our December 2010 post about a Christmas tree made from books at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco, or our post about this smaller book tree? Or perhaps you saw some mention last year of the book tree constructed by the folks at Juniper Books in Boulder?

Well, it looks like the book tree idea has caught on in other places. In Poland, librarians at the University Library of UWM (University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn), made the above-pictured tree from 1,600 books. (That’s a lot of copies of George Orwell’s 1984 and Joseph Heller’s Picture This!) Click here for details and here to view a Flickr stream showing 50+ shots of the tree, including several photos captured during the construction process, a how-to for others who want to build book trees.

And here’s a book tree located at the Inglewood Public Library, in the Los Angeles area.

Let us know if you spot other book trees elsewhere.

Related: Unconsumption posts about trees made from other non-traditional materials: shopping cartsbicycle parts, 40,000 plastic bottles, upside down tomato cages with strings of lightswood scraps.

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