Posts tagged Bikes
11:12 am - Sun, Dec 9, 2012
142 notes
File under “things I love”: Bike wheel snowman.
(via Recycled Cycles)

File under “things I love”: Bike wheel snowman.

(via Recycled Cycles)

11:16 am - Wed, Nov 28, 2012
44 notes
Mark Castator “Heart Lode”Materials: SRAM parts, used bicycle chains, silicon bronze

This year’s pART Project – sponsored by SRAM, a Chicago-based bicycle-component company –  gathered 80 artists to undertake a quixotic task: assemble a vibrant artwork using a box of 100 parts like gears, chains and frame-related miscellany. The objets will be auctioned off on November 29 in New York City, with the proceeds going toward SRAM’s World Bicycle Relief, an organization that has provided bikes and mechanical training to healthcare programs in Africa.
It’s kind of astonishing to see what somebody can conjure from what might as well be the leavings on a fix-it shop’s floor. 

More here: Incredible Sculptures Made From Bike Parts - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities

Mark Castator
“Heart Lode”
Materials: SRAM parts, used bicycle chains, silicon bronze

This year’s pART Project – sponsored by SRAM, a Chicago-based bicycle-component company – gathered 80 artists to undertake a quixotic task: assemble a vibrant artwork using a box of 100 parts like gears, chains and frame-related miscellany. The objets will be auctioned off on November 29 in New York City, with the proceeds going toward SRAM’s World Bicycle Relief, an organization that has provided bikes and mechanical training to healthcare programs in Africa.

It’s kind of astonishing to see what somebody can conjure from what might as well be the leavings on a fix-it shop’s floor.

More here: Incredible Sculptures Made From Bike Parts - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities

2:42 pm - Tue, Nov 27, 2012
133 notes
The repurposing/upcycling of old bicycles or bike parts is a recurring theme here on the Unconsumption Tumblr, and on the Unconsumption Facebook page, we’ve covered the idea that some people might be living “overpropped” lives — you know those people who don’t hunt but whose home decor includes deer antlers hanging on a wall (or whose collections of books are arranged by color)? 
Now, here’s a combination of the two ideas: Bicycle Taxidermy, “the loving and lasting solution for your mechanical bereavement.”
Bicycle Taxidermy is a business founded by UK-based Regan Appleton, who gladly mounts the handlebars of customers’ old bikes onto wood bases; each mount includes an epitaph engraved with a customer’s preferred wording. 
Example:


"HETCHINS – VADE MECUM [1972-1984] ‘The Yorkshire moors shall she forever roam’"

A bonus: I think the mounts could be used as storage for belts, jewelry, ties, dog leashes, or other items! 

The repurposing/upcycling of old bicycles or bike parts is a recurring theme here on the Unconsumption Tumblr, and on the Unconsumption Facebook pagewe’ve covered the idea that some people might be living “overpropped” lives — you know those people who don’t hunt but whose home decor includes deer antlers hanging on a wall (or whose collections of books are arranged by color)? 

Now, here’s a combination of the two ideas: Bicycle Taxidermy, “the loving and lasting solution for your mechanical bereavement.”

Bicycle Taxidermy is a business founded by UK-based Regan Appleton, who gladly mounts the handlebars of customers’ old bikes onto wood bases; each mount includes an epitaph engraved with a customer’s preferred wording. 

Example:

"HETCHINS – VADE MECUM [1972-1984] ‘The Yorkshire moors shall she forever roam’"

A bonus: I think the mounts could be used as storage for belts, jewelry, ties, dog leashes, or other items! 

10:32 am - Sat, Nov 10, 2012
100 notes

This how-to video shows how to convert old, unused 10-speeds into fast, fixed gear bikes, giving them a second life. The video shows the whole conversion process from start to finish.

(via GOOD)

5:04 pm - Wed, Nov 7, 2012
64 notes

Nelson “Kio” Mukiika has a machine shop of sorts in the Kasese district of western Uganda. I say “of sorts” because he does not have access to basic measuring tools. Nevertheless, Mukiika is able to disassemble old bikes and re-weld them together into creations of his own design: Three-wheeled hand-powered bicycles. …
Mukiika can produce the trikes for about $170, well out of reach for the average Ugandan. (More than a third of the population live on a little over $1 a day.) The funding is provided by CanUgan. You can volunteer your time, form a support group, or make a donation to the organization here.

(via CanUgan x Mukiika: Turning Old Bicycles into Hand-Powered Trikes for the Disabled - Core77)

Nelson “Kio” Mukiika has a machine shop of sorts in the Kasese district of western Uganda. I say “of sorts” because he does not have access to basic measuring tools. Nevertheless, Mukiika is able to disassemble old bikes and re-weld them together into creations of his own design: Three-wheeled hand-powered bicycles. …

Mukiika can produce the trikes for about $170, well out of reach for the average Ugandan. (More than a third of the population live on a little over $1 a day.) The funding is provided by CanUgan. You can volunteer your time, form a support group, or make a donation to the organization here.

(via CanUgan x Mukiika: Turning Old Bicycles into Hand-Powered Trikes for the Disabled - Core77)

4:18 pm - Sun, Nov 4, 2012
366 notes
Speaking of bike hacks: How about a mowercycle? 
Get exercise while mowing the lawn — without using gasoline!
An Unconsumption reader sent this photo to us some time ago. (The source has since made the photo private on Flickr.)
We always love getting tips and suggestions. Is there something Unconsumption-y you think we should be aware of? Let us know via our Facebook page, Twitter (@Unconsumption us), Instagram (tag photos #unconsumption), Pinterest, or e-mail (unconsumption [at] gmail). 
See also: A group of students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison designed a somewhat different mowercycle. Our friends at Do The Green Thing highlighted the student project here. 

Speaking of bike hacks: How about a mowercycle

Get exercise while mowing the lawn — without using gasoline!

An Unconsumption reader sent this photo to us some time ago. (The source has since made the photo private on Flickr.)

We always love getting tips and suggestions. Is there something Unconsumption-y you think we should be aware of? Let us know via our Facebook page, Twitter (@Unconsumption us), Instagram (tag photos #unconsumption), Pinterest, or e-mail (unconsumption [at] gmail). 

See also: A group of students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison designed a somewhat different mowercycle. Our friends at Do The Green Thing highlighted the student project here

7:59 pm - Sun, Oct 28, 2012
50 notes
To follow an earlier item about mobile gardens:

Produce carts are common enough that they no longer garner much attention, especially around farmers markets.
So one design firm redesigned the ubiquitous cart, adding pedals and a folding system of trays that can haul up to 150 pounds of fruit and vegetables. The result was the Mattapan Mobile Farmstand, from Boston-based nonprofit design collaborative Building Research + Architecture + Community Exchange. BR+A+CE (pronounced “brace”) designed and built the human-powered mobile farm stand as the first project in support of its mission to create new community spaces that engage social, economic, and cultural issues.
…
Pedal-powered, cargo-carrying tricycles are increasingly popular in hip neighborhoods in European and North American cities, and have been widely used in Asia for decades. BR+A+CE designed their own version on a large-framed tricycle with a unique cargo box that contains four bays on two levels, each of which holds two produce bins for a total of eight.

More: Pedaling Produce: Boston Gets a Bike-Powered Farm Cart | Wired Design | Wired.com

To follow an earlier item about mobile gardens:

Produce carts are common enough that they no longer garner much attention, especially around farmers markets.

So one design firm redesigned the ubiquitous cart, adding pedals and a folding system of trays that can haul up to 150 pounds of fruit and vegetables. The result was the Mattapan Mobile Farmstand, from Boston-based nonprofit design collaborative Building Research + Architecture + Community Exchange. BR+A+CE (pronounced “brace”) designed and built the human-powered mobile farm stand as the first project in support of its mission to create new community spaces that engage social, economic, and cultural issues.

Pedal-powered, cargo-carrying tricycles are increasingly popular in hip neighborhoods in European and North American cities, and have been widely used in Asia for decades. BR+A+CE designed their own version on a large-framed tricycle with a unique cargo box that contains four bays on two levels, each of which holds two produce bins for a total of eight.

More: Pedaling Produce: Boston Gets a Bike-Powered Farm Cart | Wired Design | Wired.com

9:36 am - Tue, Oct 2, 2012
232 notes

Maya Pedal's remarkable upcycling project is a veritable post-industrial revolution for rural Guatemalans… and potentially for underdeveloped communities the world over. The San Andrés Itzapa-based NGO accepts donated bicycles from the US and Canada, which are either refurbished and sold or, more interestingly, converted into “Bicimaquinas" (pedal-powered machines).
"Pedal power can be harnessed for countless applications which would otherwise require electricity (which may not be available) or hand power (which is far more effort). Bicimaquinas are easy and enjoyable to use. They can be built using locally available materials and can be easily adapted to suit the needs of local people. They free the user from rising energy costs, can be used anywhere, are easy to maintain, produce no pollution and provide healthy exercise."
In short, Maya Pedal turns scrap bicycle parts into all variety of human-powered municipal machinery: “water pumps, grinders, threshers, tile makers, nut shellers, blenders (for making soaps and shampoos as well as food products), trikes, trailers and more.”

(via From Cycling to Upcycling: Maya Pedal’s “Bicimaquinas” - Core77)

Maya Pedal's remarkable upcycling project is a veritable post-industrial revolution for rural Guatemalans… and potentially for underdeveloped communities the world over. The San Andrés Itzapa-based NGO accepts donated bicycles from the US and Canada, which are either refurbished and sold or, more interestingly, converted into “Bicimaquinas" (pedal-powered machines).

"Pedal power can be harnessed for countless applications which would otherwise require electricity (which may not be available) or hand power (which is far more effort). Bicimaquinas are easy and enjoyable to use. They can be built using locally available materials and can be easily adapted to suit the needs of local people. They free the user from rising energy costs, can be used anywhere, are easy to maintain, produce no pollution and provide healthy exercise."

In short, Maya Pedal turns scrap bicycle parts into all variety of human-powered municipal machinery: “water pumps, grinders, threshers, tile makers, nut shellers, blenders (for making soaps and shampoos as well as food products), trikes, trailers and more.”

(via From Cycling to Upcycling: Maya Pedal’s “Bicimaquinas” - Core77)

1:56 pm - Fri, Sep 28, 2012
54 notes

Woodguards [alternative to traditional bike mudguards] are made using re-claimed European and African timber and brightly coloured formica. They look fantastic and are very practical (they are actually lighter than your average plastic mudguards). 
Each pair are hand-made in Edinburgh, with a furniture-makers skill and attention to detail.

(via Woodguards)

Woodguards [alternative to traditional bike mudguards] are made using re-claimed European and African timber and brightly coloured formica. They look fantastic and are very practical (they are actually lighter than your average plastic mudguards). 

Each pair are hand-made in Edinburgh, with a furniture-makers skill and attention to detail.

(via Woodguards)

5:01 pm - Tue, Sep 25, 2012
69 notes

Carolina Fontoura Alzaga  makes painstakingly intricate chandelier sculptures and lighting fixtures from bicycle parts that she salvages from scrap metal yards and bicycle shop dumpsters all around Los Angeles. In making this profile, I was struck by how her social and political consciousness are woven into her life and work.

(via FACARO: Recycled Bicycle Chandeliers | The Etsy Blog)

Carolina Fontoura Alzaga  makes painstakingly intricate chandelier sculptures and lighting fixtures from bicycle parts that she salvages from scrap metal yards and bicycle shop dumpsters all around Los Angeles. In making this profile, I was struck by how her social and political consciousness are woven into her life and work.

(via FACARO: Recycled Bicycle Chandeliers | The Etsy Blog)

9:11 am - Mon, Sep 17, 2012
41 notes

The Ice Cream Bike (which takes design cues from rainbow-colored ice cream) is made simply from salvaged parts and two pieces of recycled steel that were water-cut into the profile of a bike, and then bolted together at the front tube, seat tube and bottom bracket. The bike’s low-key construction requires only a screwdriver and a wrench when it come to maintenance. And because the bike can be easily broken down, it can just as easily be transported or stored.

More: Jose Rivera’s Ice Cream Bike Turns Recycled Parts Into a Delectable Ride | Inhabitat

The Ice Cream Bike (which takes design cues from rainbow-colored ice cream) is made simply from salvaged parts and two pieces of recycled steel that were water-cut into the profile of a bike, and then bolted together at the front tube, seat tube and bottom bracket. The bike’s low-key construction requires only a screwdriver and a wrench when it come to maintenance. And because the bike can be easily broken down, it can just as easily be transported or stored.

6:14 pm - Fri, Aug 3, 2012
327 notes
good:

Cycle on the Recycled: A $9 Cardboard Bike Set to Enter Production in Israel
The last time your purchased something made entirely from cardboard, chances are it was a box to pack up your belongings. While the sturdy material is perfect for moving your stuff, an inventor from Israel has figured out a way to make cardboard move you. 
Continue reading on good.is

And for an accessory: This previously mentioned cardboard cycling helmet!

good:

Cycle on the Recycled: A $9 Cardboard Bike Set to Enter Production in Israel

The last time your purchased something made entirely from cardboard, chances are it was a box to pack up your belongings. While the sturdy material is perfect for moving your stuff, an inventor from Israel has figured out a way to make cardboard move you. 

Continue reading on good.is

And for an accessory: This previously mentioned cardboard cycling helmet!

Install Headline