Posts tagged Art
12:20 pm - Mon, Jul 21, 2014
678 notes

fer1972:

Upcycled Star Wars Junk Tech Busts by Gabriel Dishaw 

Using found objects from typewriters, adding machines and old computers, I take the items people no longer have use for and I carefully disassembling these items and then reassemble these together using metal wire creating my Junk Art.

3:40 pm - Thu, Jul 17, 2014
95 notes

If you visited Governor’s Island in New York last summer you most certainly saw the billowing, cloud-like structure that sits in the middle of the lawn. …
It’s not until you get up close that you realize it’s made from many, many plastic bottles stringed together. “53,780 used plastic bottles,” says designer Jason Klimoski, “the number thrown away in NYC in just 1 hour.” Klimoski and his team at STUDIO KCA collected the bottles – a combination of milk jugs and water bottles – and lashed them together to create “Head in the Clouds,” a pavilion people can walk into, sit inside, and contemplate just how much plastic is thrown away every day.
The structure … is now looking for its next home. If you’re interested in having this in your back yard get in touch with the designers.

More: A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC | Colossal

If you visited Governor’s Island in New York last summer you most certainly saw the billowing, cloud-like structure that sits in the middle of the lawn. …

It’s not until you get up close that you realize it’s made from many, many plastic bottles stringed together. “53,780 used plastic bottles,” says designer Jason Klimoski, “the number thrown away in NYC in just 1 hour.” Klimoski and his team at STUDIO KCA collected the bottles – a combination of milk jugs and water bottles – and lashed them together to create “Head in the Clouds,” a pavilion people can walk into, sit inside, and contemplate just how much plastic is thrown away every day.

The structure … is now looking for its next home. If you’re interested in having this in your back yard get in touch with the designers.

More: A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC | Colossal

12:20 pm - Sat, Jul 12, 2014
189 notes

significobs:

Artist Mike Stilkey uses the covers of books reclaimed from library trash heaps as a canvas for his whimsical paintings.

He works with a mix of ink, colored pencil, paint and lacquer to create each artwork that can vary from anthropomorphic animals playing instruments to portraits of men and women inspired by Weimar-era German expressionism.

More: New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey | Colossal

3:40 pm - Fri, Jul 11, 2014
1,735 notes

junkculture:

Artist Transforms a Pile of Trash into a Mind-Bending Anamorphic Illusion

French artist Bernard Pras creates artwork using a technique called anamorphosis, a distorted projection or perspective requiring the viewer to use special devices to see the complete artwork.
His latest project on exhibit at Palais Idéal du Facteur Cheval, near Lyon, France is a portrait of Ferdinand Cheval (a French postman who spent thirty-three years of his life building Le Palais idéal in Hauterives), made up of various objects found around the installation site which requires being viewed from a specific vantage point to reconstitute the image.
More here.
9:38 am - Thu, Jul 10, 2014
26 notes

Here’s an interesting and fun project, making creative use of … unloved/unused foam.
The Foam Agency:

The Agency was created to celebrate foam. We’re currently seeking scraps, offcuts, and other unloved pieces of rigid insulation foam for ‘An Insulation Installation’.
If you have foam to contribute, please let us know and we will dispatch our agents shortly.

More about this project-in-progress here.
Two notes: It’s in New York, and I’m guessing local foam is preferred. And: Foam Agency founders Lucy Knops and Elisa Werbler are former students of mine.

Here’s an interesting and fun project, making creative use of … unloved/unused foam.

The Foam Agency:

The Agency was created to celebrate foam. We’re currently seeking scraps, offcuts, and other unloved pieces of rigid insulation foam for ‘An Insulation Installation’.

If you have foam to contribute, please let us know and we will dispatch our agents shortly.

More about this project-in-progress here.

Two notes: It’s in New York, and I’m guessing local foam is preferred. And: Foam Agency founders Lucy Knops and Elisa Werbler are former students of mine.

3:05 pm - Mon, Jun 30, 2014
45 notes
What can be done with burned-out, or even shattered light bulbs? Here’s one eye-catching answer: 

The Bulbbox, by Ángel Tausía, is pretty much just want it sounds like – a lamp made with a box of bulbs.
A matte white aluminum box holds a series of burned out bulbs and bulb fragments along with one bulb and socket that actually works.

(via Bulbbox: A Lamp Made with a Box of Bulbs - Design Milk)

What can be done with burned-out, or even shattered light bulbs? Here’s one eye-catching answer:

The Bulbbox, by Ángel Tausía, is pretty much just want it sounds like – a lamp made with a box of bulbs.

A matte white aluminum box holds a series of burned out bulbs and bulb fragments along with one bulb and socket that actually works.

(via Bulbbox: A Lamp Made with a Box of Bulbs - Design Milk)

3:40 pm - Sun, Jun 29, 2014
112 notes



Jeremy Underwood’s ongoing photo series Human Debris repurposes found trash into site-specific sculptures.




Municipal waterways often double as highways for garbage—a well-known and highly visible problem with no obvious solution. So when photographer Jeremy Underwood stumbled across an especially polluted beach in Houston, he decided to make the trash he found into more than just lazily bobbing reminders of intractability.
“I simply couldn’t believe the state this area was in,” Underwood told WIRED by email. “Garbage littered the shoreline, a pungent smell filled the air and signs about the polluted waters stood in confirmation of its degraded state. Hidden from view, I felt something had to be done to bring attention to this beach … it struck me for the first time that taking only a picture was not enough. ”

 (via Monuments Made of Trash Remind Us to Treat Earth More Kindly | Raw File | WIRED)

Jeremy Underwood’s ongoing photo series Human Debris repurposes found trash into site-specific sculptures.

Municipal waterways often double as highways for garbage—a well-known and highly visible problem with no obvious solution. So when photographer Jeremy Underwood stumbled across an especially polluted beach in Houston, he decided to make the trash he found into more than just lazily bobbing reminders of intractability.

“I simply couldn’t believe the state this area was in,” Underwood told WIRED by email. “Garbage littered the shoreline, a pungent smell filled the air and signs about the polluted waters stood in confirmation of its degraded state. Hidden from view, I felt something had to be done to bring attention to this beach … it struck me for the first time that taking only a picture was not enough. ”

 (via Monuments Made of Trash Remind Us to Treat Earth More Kindly | Raw File | WIRED)

3:40 pm - Tue, Jun 24, 2014
159 notes

junkculture:

Photos of Sculptural Installation Made of Broken Medical Equipment Found in an Abandoned Hospital

From 1984 until 1987, photographer Arthur Tress Tress turned the dark, haunting halls of an abandoned hospital in NYC into a series of sculptural installations by arranging, modifying, and painting medical equipment found in the building, and documented his creations. 
More here.
12:20 pm - Mon, Jun 23, 2014
196 notes

junkculture:

Tiny World Cup Team Jerseys Made out of Recycled Cigarette Boxes

British artist Leo Fitzmaurice recycles found materials into works that lie somewhere between sculpture, craft and the activity of collecting. His project titled “Post Match”, is comprised of found cigarette boxes from pavements around the world that have been neatly, and humorously, repurposed into miniature soccer jerseys.
See more here.

(via murketing)

3:40 pm - Sat, Jun 14, 2014
226 notes

pr1nceshawn:

AT-AT made out of reclaimed skateboards by Derek Keenan

(Source: superpunch.net, via thingsrecycledusefully)

7:23 am - Thu, Jun 12, 2014
150 notes
Memory Suitcases 
Israeli photographer Yuval Yairi uses worn, vintage suitcases as canvases for photos he’s taken: 

Several of the suitcase images are of abandoned houses once belonging to Palestinian Arabs who escaped or were evacuated during the 1948 and 1967 wars. Some of the houses have remained untouched and decaying ever since; others have been inhabited by Jews who immigrated to Israel following the Second World War; others still are being converted into exclusive modern homes.
All bear testimony to a far-from-remote history that we Israelis may try to forget, ignore or erase. Meanwhile, many Palestinians keep the keys to these houses, just as mementos, or in the hope of returning.
A suitcase is perhaps the most potent and familiar image associated with migration, and for many different peoples an icon of wandering and displacement.

(via Mail Online)

Memory Suitcases 

Israeli photographer Yuval Yairi uses worn, vintage suitcases as canvases for photos he’s taken: 

Several of the suitcase images are of abandoned houses once belonging to Palestinian Arabs who escaped or were evacuated during the 1948 and 1967 wars. Some of the houses have remained untouched and decaying ever since; others have been inhabited by Jews who immigrated to Israel following the Second World War; others still are being converted into exclusive modern homes.

All bear testimony to a far-from-remote history that we Israelis may try to forget, ignore or erase. Meanwhile, many Palestinians keep the keys to these houses, just as mementos, or in the hope of returning.

A suitcase is perhaps the most potent and familiar image associated with migration, and for many different peoples an icon of wandering and displacement.

(via Mail Online)

3:40 pm - Mon, Jun 9, 2014
167 notes

Philadelphia artist Kim Alsbrooks recreates historial oil portraits on flattened beers cans and fast food containers. Titled “My White Trash Family” the series was conceived while Alsbrook was living in the south and found herself grappling with prevailing ideas of class. She shares via a statement about the project:

(via Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks | Colossal)

Philadelphia artist Kim Alsbrooks recreates historial oil portraits on flattened beers cans and fast food containers. Titled “My White Trash Family” the series was conceived while Alsbrook was living in the south and found herself grappling with prevailing ideas of class. She shares via a statement about the project:

(via Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks | Colossal)

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