9:10 am - Fri, Nov 30, 2012
306 notes
Core77 points out “a decidedly anti-consumerist ‘product’ from the folks at Sugru: the Fixer’s Manifesto”: 
Fixing is the unsung hero of creativity. And it really shouldn’t be. It’s the most common, humble and beautiful form of creativity. Let’s wear that belief proudly. Let’s notice and celebrate these little everyday triumphs, and help others see their value. We made this to fuel the conversation about why a culture of fixing is so important.
 More: A Fixed Thing Is a Beautiful Thing: The Fixer’s Manifesto - Core77
PS: Earlier Uncon post about Sugru, here. And here are some more past posts about mending or repairing what you already own.

Core77 points out “a decidedly anti-consumerist ‘product’ from the folks at Sugru: the Fixer’s Manifesto”: 

Fixing is the unsung hero of creativity. And it really shouldn’t be. It’s the most common, humble and beautiful form of creativity. Let’s wear that belief proudly. Let’s notice and celebrate these little everyday triumphs, and help others see their value. We made this to fuel the conversation about why a culture of fixing is so important.

 More: A Fixed Thing Is a Beautiful Thing: The Fixer’s Manifesto - Core77

PS: Earlier Uncon post about Sugru, here. And here are some more past posts about mending or repairing what you already own.

9:11 am - Thu, Nov 29, 2012
126 notes
Make something that says: Buy Nothing New
Be creative, think outside the box and make it with something you already have or something you find. It can be very simple and does not have to be perfect.
That’s the start of the rules/instructions for a contest from Buy Nothing New For A Year that Unconsumption must endorse! The rest is here (and above).
But my favorite bit is the grand prize: Nothing!
As a matter of fact: Incorporate Mr. Cart in your entry, and not only will we highlight your efforts here, but if you win we will match the current grand prize. You’ll get double-nothing! How can you resist??
Anyway, buynothingnewforayear says:

I hope you will participate, this is going to be super fun! A great opportunity for you to be creative and spread the message of consuming less. If you enter, you will be eligible to win NOTHING!!! For more information click here and visit the Buy Nothing New for a Year tumblr blog.
  1. Make something that says: Buy Nothing New
  2. Be creative, think outside the box and make it with something you already have or something you find. It can be very simple and does not have to be perfect.

That’s the start of the rules/instructions for a contest from Buy Nothing New For A Year that Unconsumption must endorse! The rest is here (and above).

But my favorite bit is the grand prize: Nothing!

As a matter of fact: Incorporate Mr. Cart in your entry, and not only will we highlight your efforts here, but if you win we will match the current grand prize. You’ll get double-nothing! How can you resist??

Anyway, buynothingnewforayear says:

I hope you will participate, this is going to be super fun! A great opportunity for you to be creative and spread the message of consuming less. If you enter, you will be eligible to win NOTHING!!! For more information click here and visit the Buy Nothing New for a Year tumblr blog.

11:16 am - Wed, Nov 28, 2012
44 notes
Mark Castator “Heart Lode”Materials: SRAM parts, used bicycle chains, silicon bronze

This year’s pART Project – sponsored by SRAM, a Chicago-based bicycle-component company –  gathered 80 artists to undertake a quixotic task: assemble a vibrant artwork using a box of 100 parts like gears, chains and frame-related miscellany. The objets will be auctioned off on November 29 in New York City, with the proceeds going toward SRAM’s World Bicycle Relief, an organization that has provided bikes and mechanical training to healthcare programs in Africa.
It’s kind of astonishing to see what somebody can conjure from what might as well be the leavings on a fix-it shop’s floor. 

More here: Incredible Sculptures Made From Bike Parts - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities

Mark Castator
“Heart Lode”
Materials: SRAM parts, used bicycle chains, silicon bronze

This year’s pART Project – sponsored by SRAM, a Chicago-based bicycle-component company – gathered 80 artists to undertake a quixotic task: assemble a vibrant artwork using a box of 100 parts like gears, chains and frame-related miscellany. The objets will be auctioned off on November 29 in New York City, with the proceeds going toward SRAM’s World Bicycle Relief, an organization that has provided bikes and mechanical training to healthcare programs in Africa.

It’s kind of astonishing to see what somebody can conjure from what might as well be the leavings on a fix-it shop’s floor.

More here: Incredible Sculptures Made From Bike Parts - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities

9:54 am
66 notes

Italian company mnmur takes old tires and makes them into wonderful things like belts, wallets, bags, and even jewelry.

Some of the products still take on their bike tire personality, while with others, you’d never guess where the material came from.

More: mnmur Upcycled Rubber Tires - Design Milk
Previous examples of bike-tire reuse we’ve noted are here and here.
Italian company mnmur takes old tires and makes them into wonderful things like belts, wallets, bags, and even jewelry.
Some of the products still take on their bike tire personality, while with others, you’d never guess where the material came from.

More: mnmur Upcycled Rubber Tires - Design Milk

Previous examples of bike-tire reuse we’ve noted are here and here.

4:56 pm - Tue, Nov 27, 2012
167 notes
DIY project du jour:
Glue buttons onto an old rake head.
Et voilà — Christmas tree!
(Spotted on Facebook here, and Pinterest here.) 

DIY project du jour:

Glue buttons onto an old rake head.

Et voilà — Christmas tree!

(Spotted on Facebook here, and Pinterest here.) 

2:42 pm
132 notes
The repurposing/upcycling of old bicycles or bike parts is a recurring theme here on the Unconsumption Tumblr, and on the Unconsumption Facebook page, we’ve covered the idea that some people might be living “overpropped” lives — you know those people who don’t hunt but whose home decor includes deer antlers hanging on a wall (or whose collections of books are arranged by color)? 
Now, here’s a combination of the two ideas: Bicycle Taxidermy, “the loving and lasting solution for your mechanical bereavement.”
Bicycle Taxidermy is a business founded by UK-based Regan Appleton, who gladly mounts the handlebars of customers’ old bikes onto wood bases; each mount includes an epitaph engraved with a customer’s preferred wording. 
Example:


"HETCHINS – VADE MECUM [1972-1984] ‘The Yorkshire moors shall she forever roam’"

A bonus: I think the mounts could be used as storage for belts, jewelry, ties, dog leashes, or other items! 

The repurposing/upcycling of old bicycles or bike parts is a recurring theme here on the Unconsumption Tumblr, and on the Unconsumption Facebook pagewe’ve covered the idea that some people might be living “overpropped” lives — you know those people who don’t hunt but whose home decor includes deer antlers hanging on a wall (or whose collections of books are arranged by color)? 

Now, here’s a combination of the two ideas: Bicycle Taxidermy, “the loving and lasting solution for your mechanical bereavement.”

Bicycle Taxidermy is a business founded by UK-based Regan Appleton, who gladly mounts the handlebars of customers’ old bikes onto wood bases; each mount includes an epitaph engraved with a customer’s preferred wording. 

Example:

"HETCHINS – VADE MECUM [1972-1984] ‘The Yorkshire moors shall she forever roam’"

A bonus: I think the mounts could be used as storage for belts, jewelry, ties, dog leashes, or other items! 

10:23 am
636 notes

The National Center for Craft and Design has selected the un-knitting machine as one of the best student design projects of 2012. This highly unusual bicycle, designed to help recycle unwanted woolen clothes, unravels any clothing item back into its pre-knitted form.
The starting point for the project came from the discovery that some charity shops devote hours to unravelling home-knitted jumpers.
The un-knitting machine … sits on a chair pedaling and wool passes through steam coming out of a kettle before being collected on a spindle. The yarn can then be collected and sold in neat piles. 
Watch a video here:

(via Converted Bicycle Unravels Old Sweaters To Knit Something New - PSFK)

The National Center for Craft and Design has selected the un-knitting machine as one of the best student design projects of 2012. This highly unusual bicycle, designed to help recycle unwanted woolen clothes, unravels any clothing item back into its pre-knitted form.

The starting point for the project came from the discovery that some charity shops devote hours to unravelling home-knitted jumpers.

The un-knitting machine … sits on a chair pedaling and wool passes through steam coming out of a kettle before being collected on a spindle. The yarn can then be collected and sold in neat piles. 

Watch a video here:

(via Converted Bicycle Unravels Old Sweaters To Knit Something New - PSFK)

10:42 am - Mon, Nov 26, 2012
90 notes

Singapore-based Saught is a social business that aims to create an international community of advocates through its collaborative model, championing for peace building efforts.
It produces jewelry from landmines and unexploded ordnance to support sustainability in post-conflict countries such as Cambodia.

(via Jewelry Made From Landmine Shrapnel - PSFK)

Singapore-based Saught is a social business that aims to create an international community of advocates through its collaborative model, championing for peace building efforts.

It produces jewelry from landmines and unexploded ordnance to support sustainability in post-conflict countries such as Cambodia.

(via Jewelry Made From Landmine Shrapnel - PSFK)

11:01 am - Sat, Nov 24, 2012
132 notes
Lifehacker says: 

The best part about this impeccably organized junk drawer is that it repurposes unused things around the house, thereby tackling even more junk—for free.
Here’s how we did it:

 Organize Your Junk Drawer with Stuff You Already Have Around the House

Lifehacker says:

The best part about this impeccably organized junk drawer is that it repurposes unused things around the house, thereby tackling even more junk—for free.

Here’s how we did it:

 Organize Your Junk Drawer with Stuff You Already Have Around the House

10:58 am - Fri, Nov 23, 2012
59 notes

The chairs are the culmination of a project which set out to investigate the concept of sustainability and are constructed from four chairs that were previously in a state which rendered them unusable. The shells are polypropylene and the bases are made from beech. They are finished in colour co-ordinated decoupage made from newspaper and magazine cuttings.

(via Re:Polo - Peter Ward Design)

The chairs are the culmination of a project which set out to investigate the concept of sustainability and are constructed from four chairs that were previously in a state which rendered them unusable. The shells are polypropylene and the bases are made from beech. They are finished in colour co-ordinated decoupage made from newspaper and magazine cuttings.

(via Re:Polo - Peter Ward Design)

3:26 pm - Thu, Nov 22, 2012
37 notes

It isn’t often that the worlds of recycling and techno music come together.
But thanks to Heavenly Recordings, the European Recycling Platform and Radio 1 DJ Benji B, they have.
Make Noise is a top techno club night and it’s being held around the [U.K.] as part of the Electronic Recycling Tour.
And what’s more, it’s free to enter. Instead of cash, you just need to hand over a knackered electronic item. It can be anything from an old phone to a broken radio to a dead battery.
… 
The next Make Noise is in … Glasgow on November 22nd, ending with a huge night in London on the 27th. For all the details, click here.

(via Do The Green Thing: Make noise for e-waste recycling)

It isn’t often that the worlds of recycling and techno music come together.

But thanks to Heavenly Recordings, the European Recycling Platform and Radio 1 DJ Benji B, they have.

Make Noise is a top techno club night and it’s being held around the [U.K.] as part of the Electronic Recycling Tour.

And what’s more, it’s free to enter. Instead of cash, you just need to hand over a knackered electronic item. It can be anything from an old phone to a broken radio to a dead battery.

The next Make Noise is in … Glasgow on November 22nd, ending with a huge night in London on the 27th. For all the details, click here.

(via Do The Green Thing: Make noise for e-waste recycling)

4:43 pm - Wed, Nov 21, 2012
163 notes
BLOCK Friday instead of Black Friday? Yes!
The notion of Unconsumption is all about being mindful of what you consume — what you buy, when and why you buy it, what you do with things you no longer need or want — and appreciating what you already own.
So, naturally, we Unconsumptioneers were psyched to learn the good folks at Holstee (mentioned previously here) are spreading the idea of “taking back” Black Friday — that is, being mindful of what you’re doing on the Friday after American Thanksgiving, a huge, promotion-driven shopping day that many people consider to be the start of the holiday shopping season.
(Maybe you’ve heard about this year’s “Black Friday creep,” with some chains, including Target, Walmart, and Sears, opening for the first time on Thanksgiving day? But, wait, there’s more: Even though Canadians celebrate Thanksgiving in October, The Los Angeles Times reports that some retailers in Canada, such as the 800 stores in North America’s largest mall, the West Edmonton Mall, are, for the first time, “officially recognizing Black Friday with extended hours and sales.”)
Instead of joining the 147 million shoppers the National Retail Federation projects will buy stuff this weekend, you could, as Holstee puts it, choose to “Block Friday" — block off time to do something you find meaningful.
You could, quite simply, do something that makes you and/or other people happy. (Leave notes in random places? Spend time with someone you care about?)
Something else you can do: Help spread the word about Block Friday by reblogging this post. 
Also, tell us: How will you spend Black Friday?
[On Twitter, include the #BLOCKFRIDAY tag in your tweets so others can read about your plans.]

See also: November 2010 Unconsumption post on Buy Nothing Day.

BLOCK Friday instead of Black Friday? Yes!

The notion of Unconsumption is all about being mindful of what you consume — what you buy, when and why you buy it, what you do with things you no longer need or want — and appreciating what you already own.

So, naturally, we Unconsumptioneers were psyched to learn the good folks at Holstee (mentioned previously here) are spreading the idea of “taking back” Black Friday — that is, being mindful of what you’re doing on the Friday after American Thanksgiving, a huge, promotion-driven shopping day that many people consider to be the start of the holiday shopping season.

(Maybe you’ve heard about this year’s “Black Friday creep,” with some chains, including Target, Walmart, and Sears, opening for the first time on Thanksgiving day? But, wait, there’s more: Even though Canadians celebrate Thanksgiving in October, The Los Angeles Times reports that some retailers in Canada, such as the 800 stores in North America’s largest mall, the West Edmonton Mall, are, for the first time, “officially recognizing Black Friday with extended hours and sales.”)

Instead of joining the 147 million shoppers the National Retail Federation projects will buy stuff this weekend, you could, as Holstee puts it, choose to “Block Friday" — block off time to do something you find meaningful.

You could, quite simply, do something that makes you and/or other people happy. (Leave notes in random places? Spend time with someone you care about?)

Something else you can do: Help spread the word about Block Friday by reblogging this post.

Also, tell us: How will you spend Black Friday?

[On Twitter, include the #BLOCKFRIDAY tag in your tweets so others can read about your plans.]

See also: November 2010 Unconsumption post on Buy Nothing Day.

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