10:00 am - Thu, Jul 25, 2013
127 notes

To facilitate people looking for free used items and saving things from getting wasted or thrashed a Canadian company has built a web app called the Trashwag. What it does is pretty simple, it points out reusable stuff available in the neighborhood on the map and help people finding stuff that can be useful for them including furniture, old machinery etc. As its a web app it is not only compatible with computers but also works with smartphone and tablet platforms including iOS and Android.

More details here: New Trashwag app makes it easier to find reusable and free stuff online

To facilitate people looking for free used items and saving things from getting wasted or thrashed a Canadian company has built a web app called the Trashwag. What it does is pretty simple, it points out reusable stuff available in the neighborhood on the map and help people finding stuff that can be useful for them including furniture, old machinery etc. As its a web app it is not only compatible with computers but also works with smartphone and tablet platforms including iOS and Android.

More details here: New Trashwag app makes it easier to find reusable and free stuff online

11:00 am - Wed, Jul 24, 2013
25 notes

Piet Hein Eek believes in creating products with the aim that there will be no materials left over, or creating products using leftover materials. Often leftover materials go to waste because the labour to reappropriate them is too expensive, so the Dutch furniture designer decided to turn this notion on its head.

Check out the video here.

11:00 am - Tue, Jul 23, 2013
80 notes

"University Aims to Build ‘Vanishing’ Electronics," reports the AssociatedPress:

They are called ‘transient electronics.’ Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are studying how to make devices, like cellphones, disappear or dissolve so they don’t pose a threat to the environment. 

7:50 pm - Mon, Jul 22, 2013
72 notes

A “please recycle” message doesn’t have to be the ubiquitous chasing arrows we’ve all seen. In fact, it can be any interpretation of the message you can think of. This is a great opportunity to flex your creative muscle while helping the planet. Put a “please recycle” label, claim or message in a prominent place on your printed materials. We know real estate on printed materials is precious—but so is our planet!

More here.

Via @svaPoD

10:00 am
129 notes

Check out this new pro-recycling ad: From the point of view of a bottle explaining why she (well, it sure sounds like she) wouldn’t give up on being recycled into something new and useful, like a bench, even if everyone thought she was just trash.

I think it’s pretty good.

Another take on the campaign is here: Bottles and Cans Plead to Be Recycled in New Ads for Keep America Beautiful | Adweek

11:00 am - Thu, Jul 18, 2013
25 notes

Piet Hein Eek has designed handcrafted packaging for renowned champagne makers Ruinart, drawing on his traditional trademark material of reclaimed wood,

(via Bubbles box | Design Indaba)
Find earlier Unconsumption posts on Piet Hein Eek here.

Piet Hein Eek has designed handcrafted packaging for renowned champagne makers Ruinart, drawing on his traditional trademark material of reclaimed wood,

(via Bubbles box | Design Indaba)

Find earlier Unconsumption posts on Piet Hein Eek here.

2:38 pm - Wed, Jul 17, 2013
1,015 notes

Second-hand leather jackets upcycled into pillows. 

(via 2NDHAND)

5:46 pm - Tue, Jul 16, 2013
130 notes
DIY project du jour:
Why not turn an old window screen into a reusable tote bag?
For how-to details: Check out the Between the lines blog’s mesh bag tutorial. 
Omitting the pouch part and/or using a piece of cardboard as the bag’s removable bottom could simplify things. For the straps, maybe use an old belt?

DIY project du jour:

Why not turn an old window screen into a reusable tote bag?

For how-to details: Check out the Between the lines blog’s mesh bag tutorial

Omitting the pouch part and/or using a piece of cardboard as the bag’s removable bottom could simplify things. For the straps, maybe use an old belt?

11:30 am
67 notes


Recycled magazines, wood, broken glass and brass are transformed into bespoke jewellery pieces in Quazi Design’s new Paper Scissors Stone collection.


(via Paper Scissors Stone | Design Indaba)
Recycled magazines, wood, broken glass and brass are transformed into bespoke jewellery pieces in Quazi Design’s new Paper Scissors Stone collection.

(via Paper Scissors Stone | Design Indaba)

11:00 am - Mon, Jul 15, 2013
28 notes

California-based company MotoArt designs striking furniture pieces made from iconic aircraft. More sculpture than industrial design, MotoArt brings function, history, and a sense of eclecticism to their pieces…. All of the company’s desks are made from parts they have salvaged from vintage airplanes.

Aviation-Inspired Desks Made of Salvaged Airplane Parts - Design Milk

California-based company MotoArt designs striking furniture pieces made from iconic aircraft. More sculpture than industrial design, MotoArt brings function, history, and a sense of eclecticism to their pieces…. All of the company’s desks are made from parts they have salvaged from vintage airplanes.

Aviation-Inspired Desks Made of Salvaged Airplane Parts - Design Milk

11:45 am - Fri, Jul 12, 2013
218 notes
Here is an interesting intersection of the “reuse” urge, domestic paranoia, and convenience: Take your “old” smartphone (really?) and create a homebrew surveillance system that lets you monitor your peephole from your kitchen sink. Mixed feelings! But still: 

Xentry is a new product that transforms an old iPhone or Galaxy into a smart door by replacing it’s peephole. A spare smartphone can be reused to provide a live audio/video steam over wi-fi so you can see who is on the other side of your door and communicate with visitors.
The old phone is mounted on the inside of a front door with a peephole attachment replacing the existing peephole lens, allowing the phone’s camera to see whoever is outside. Xavage Technologies developed the housing and app, which provides clear sound to and from the visitor using a patent-pending audio transfer system.

 More: Convert Outdated Smartphones Into Door Peepholes [Video] - PSFK)

Here is an interesting intersection of the “reuse” urge, domestic paranoia, and convenience: Take your “old” smartphone (really?) and create a homebrew surveillance system that lets you monitor your peephole from your kitchen sink. Mixed feelings! But still:

Xentry is a new product that transforms an old iPhone or Galaxy into a smart door by replacing it’s peephole. A spare smartphone can be reused to provide a live audio/video steam over wi-fi so you can see who is on the other side of your door and communicate with visitors.

The old phone is mounted on the inside of a front door with a peephole attachment replacing the existing peephole lens, allowing the phone’s camera to see whoever is outside. Xavage Technologies developed the housing and app, which provides clear sound to and from the visitor using a patent-pending audio transfer system.

 More: Convert Outdated Smartphones Into Door Peepholes [Video] - PSFK)

11:34 am - Thu, Jul 11, 2013
53 notes

The concept for the Paper Pulp Helmet was designed by a group of artists to potentially be a safety side dish to London’s bike share program. It could be sold in vending machines or stores near the docking stations for just £1, the designers say. 

But some are not impressed. More here: This Goofy-Looking Helmet Is Made Of Old Newspapers | Popular Science

The concept for the Paper Pulp Helmet was designed by a group of artists to potentially be a safety side dish to London’s bike share program. It could be sold in vending machines or stores near the docking stations for just £1, the designers say. 

But some are not impressed. More here: This Goofy-Looking Helmet Is Made Of Old Newspapers | Popular Science

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