10:09 am - Mon, Apr 8, 2013
77 notes

An Australian design firm worked with a publisher to start redesigning book covers: now, the dust jacket of some new novels in Australia can be flipped around, bent around the book, and sealed to be sent to a nonprofit that gives books to the homeless. The design is flexible, so it can easily be adapted for different book sizes and edited to include a different nonprofit’s address in the region where the books are sold.

More, including a video, here: A Dust Jacket That Transforms into a Shipping Box to Donate Used Books | Australia on GOOD

An Australian design firm worked with a publisher to start redesigning book covers: now, the dust jacket of some new novels in Australia can be flipped around, bent around the book, and sealed to be sent to a nonprofit that gives books to the homeless. The design is flexible, so it can easily be adapted for different book sizes and edited to include a different nonprofit’s address in the region where the books are sold.

More, including a video, here: A Dust Jacket That Transforms into a Shipping Box to Donate Used Books | Australia on GOOD

11:44 am - Sat, Apr 6, 2013
72 notes

explore-blog:

At the American Academy in Rome, filmmaker Nicholas Heller follows Visiting Artist Ann Weber on her daily rounds, scavenging cardboard boxes out of dumpsters, collecting ideas from architectural details and Bernini sculptures and creating sculpture in her studio.

(via explore-blog)

5:12 pm - Fri, Apr 5, 2013
146 notes
It’s wine o’clock (somewhere), so time to share an adult beverage-related repurposing find. 
Today, it’s Champagne corks used as bike handlebar caps. (photo by Jon Heslop) 
For earlier items in Unconsumption’s wine o’clock series, check out the archive here.
Cheers!

It’s wine o’clock (somewhere), so time to share an adult beverage-related repurposing find. 

Today, it’s Champagne corks used as bike handlebar caps. (photo by Jon Heslop

For earlier items in Unconsumption’s wine o’clock series, check out the archive here.

Cheers!

12:47 pm
293 notes
gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Former men’s room of what used to be an elementary school in Detroit; the Catherine Ferguson Academy, a charter high school for young mothers and pregnant teens, now calls the historic building home. 
The property’s grounds feature a four-acre urban farm, which helps teach students about gardening, and enhances their skills sets.
The school, which allows students to “attend classes and care for their babies in a single environment,” was slated to be closed in 2011. Thanks to community members who rallied in support of the school, the school remains open today. Almost all the school’s graduates enroll in two- or four-year colleges.
Via The Unreal Estate Guide to Detroit: Places: Design Observer. Photograph by Andrew Herscher.

Seems fitting to follow this earlier Unconsumption post about repurposed urinals with this one on fixtures-turned-planters-in-girls’-school!   

gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Former men’s room of what used to be an elementary school in Detroit; the Catherine Ferguson Academy, a charter high school for young mothers and pregnant teens, now calls the historic building home. 

The property’s grounds feature a four-acre urban farm, which helps teach students about gardening, and enhances their skills sets.

The school, which allows students to “attend classes and care for their babies in a single environment,” was slated to be closed in 2011. Thanks to community members who rallied in support of the school, the school remains open today. Almost all the school’s graduates enroll in two- or four-year colleges.

Via The Unreal Estate Guide to Detroit: Places: Design Observer. Photograph by Andrew Herscher.

Seems fitting to follow this earlier Unconsumption post about repurposed urinals with this one on fixtures-turned-planters-in-girls’-school!   

10:31 am
49 notes
Okay, this silly but it’s Friday, and I feel compelled to note “what’s easily the most creative (and nuttier) adaptive re-use project we’ve seen,” as one observer puts it: 

The Attendant in London converts a Victorian-era public lavatory into a posh new cafe. [It] preserves the erstwhile loo’s period urinals, produced by Doulton & Co. in 1890, which were cleaned (duh) and polished to a sparkling white finish. A long wooden plank was wedged into the upper halves of the urinals to create continuous table space along the back wall. The urinal walls function as table partitions, while the banquette  showcases their surprisingly plastic forms.
Aside from the sculptural toilets, the original tiling on the floors and walls were also restored.

Final judgment: “surreal and more than a little gross.”
Agreed. But still. 
(via At This Cafe, Drink Coffee Alongside Period-Perfect Urinals - Eating Pretty - Curbed National)

Okay, this silly but it’s Friday, and I feel compelled to note “what’s easily the most creative (and nuttier) adaptive re-use project we’ve seen,” as one observer puts it: 

The Attendant in London converts a Victorian-era public lavatory into a posh new cafe. [It] preserves the erstwhile loo’s period urinals, produced by Doulton & Co. in 1890, which were cleaned (duh) and polished to a sparkling white finish. A long wooden plank was wedged into the upper halves of the urinals to create continuous table space along the back wall. The urinal walls function as table partitions, while the banquette  showcases their surprisingly plastic forms.

Aside from the sculptural toilets, the original tiling on the floors and walls were also restored.

Final judgment: “surreal and more than a little gross.”

Agreed. But still.

(via At This Cafe, Drink Coffee Alongside Period-Perfect Urinals - Eating Pretty - Curbed National)

7:22 pm - Thu, Apr 4, 2013
581 notes
Cup of tea, anyone?
Some 3,000 tea bags (yes, you read that right!) make up this installation at Rolling Greens, a “home and garden destination” in Los Angeles. (Spotted on Pinterest here. Source: Los Angeles, I’m Yours, which features additional photos.) 
See also: Quilt made from steeped tea bags. 
How would you describe this example of repurposing? Beautiful? Or not your cup of tea?

Cup of tea, anyone?

Some 3,000 tea bags (yes, you read that right!) make up this installation at Rolling Greens, a “home and garden destination” in Los Angeles. (Spotted on Pinterest here. Source: Los Angeles, I’m Yours, which features additional photos.) 

See also: Quilt made from steeped tea bags

How would you describe this example of repurposing? Beautiful? Or not your cup of tea?

9:44 am
145 notes

Made from redwood reclaimed from old fences and barns, these chicken coops arrive packed in a kit small enough that it can actually fit in a bicycle box. … The parts can easily be assembled in your own backyard.

(via DIY, Recycled Chicken Coops that Can Be Moved By Bike | Design on GOOD)
From our archives: Chicken coop made from a clothes dryer!

Made from redwood reclaimed from old fences and barns, these chicken coops arrive packed in a kit small enough that it can actually fit in a bicycle box. … The parts can easily be assembled in your own backyard.

(via DIY, Recycled Chicken Coops that Can Be Moved By Bike | Design on GOOD)

From our archives: Chicken coop made from a clothes dryer!

4:04 pm - Wed, Apr 3, 2013
120 notes
Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson turns discarded furniture into eye-catching sculptural assemblages.
(via My Modern Met)

Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson turns discarded furniture into eye-catching sculptural assemblages.

(via My Modern Met)

10:44 am
180 notes
DIY idea du jour: 
Recover worn furniture with used paint sticks. Colorful and rustic looking, for sure.
To help in gathering sticks, tell your neighbors you’re collecting sticks. Also, ask staff at a store that sells paint to keep their used sticks for you.
(Photo by matangi.etsy on Flickr; spotted on Pinterest here.)

DIY idea du jour:

Recover worn furniture with used paint sticks. Colorful and rustic looking, for sure.

To help in gathering sticks, tell your neighbors you’re collecting sticks. Also, ask staff at a store that sells paint to keep their used sticks for you.

(Photo by matangi.etsy on Flickr; spotted on Pinterest here.)

12:57 pm - Tue, Apr 2, 2013
185 notes
What do you do with expired or otherwise unwanted credit cards?
Kristal Romano turns them into wearable art.

What do you do with expired or otherwise unwanted credit cards?

Kristal Romano turns them into wearable art.

9:07 am
34 notes
Those of you who have been following Unconsumption for a while — either here on Tumblr, or on Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram, and/or Twitter — probably know that I (Molly) have a thing for vintage rulers, yardsticks, and measuring tapes. (Yes, an Unconsumption Pinterest board devoted to vintage measuring tools does exist!) 
So, when I came across an Etsy blog post on Vanessa Boer, I found myself drawn to several of Vanessa’s repurposed-ruler creations, particularly the pieces pictured here that incorporate vintage pencils. 
Nice!

Those of you who have been following Unconsumption for a while — either here on Tumblr, or on Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram, and/or Twitter — probably know that I (Molly) have a thing for vintage rulers, yardsticks, and measuring tapes. (Yes, an Unconsumption Pinterest board devoted to vintage measuring tools does exist!) 

So, when I came across an Etsy blog post on Vanessa Boer, I found myself drawn to several of Vanessa’s repurposed-ruler creations, particularly the pieces pictured here that incorporate vintage pencils. 

Nice!

image

1:30 pm - Mon, Apr 1, 2013
487 notes
We’ve spotted an example of seat cushions upholstered with old belts, and have seen old suits turned into tote bags (here and here), and, now, there’s this:
Suits used as upholstery.
(photo via Good Ideas For You)
What do you think of this upcycling example?

We’ve spotted an example of seat cushions upholstered with old belts, and have seen old suits turned into tote bags (here and here), and, now, there’s this:

Suits used as upholstery.

(photo via Good Ideas For You)

What do you think of this upcycling example?

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