10:52 am - Mon, Sep 16, 2013
28 notes

Having mastered innovative wool-lined wetsuits designed for near-Arctic conditions, Patagonia unleashed their research and development team and returned to their Southern California roots with the recent release of the R1 warm water wetsuit. By taking everything they knew about building suits for cold water and applying it to warm water, Patagonia was able to swap the merino wool for a specially developed recycled polyester blend to create a wetsuit unlike any other currently existing on the market.

More: Patagonia R1 - Cool Hunting

Having mastered innovative wool-lined wetsuits designed for near-Arctic conditions, Patagonia unleashed their research and development team and returned to their Southern California roots with the recent release of the R1 warm water wetsuit. By taking everything they knew about building suits for cold water and applying it to warm water, Patagonia was able to swap the merino wool for a specially developed recycled polyester blend to create a wetsuit unlike any other currently existing on the market.

More: Patagonia R1 - Cool Hunting

3:40 pm - Thu, Sep 12, 2013
109 notes

Artist Gille Monte Ruici creates robots of all shapes and sizes using toasters, lamps, and other recycled materials. His work is currently on display at the + Brauer Gallery in Paris, and you can find more unique robots at his website.

Via: laughingsquid: Robot Sculptures Made From Recycled Materials by Gille Monte Ruici

Artist Gille Monte Ruici creates robots of all shapes and sizes using toasters, lamps, and other recycled materials. His work is currently on display at the + Brauer Gallery in Paris, and you can find more unique robots at his website.

Via: laughingsquid: Robot Sculptures Made From Recycled Materials by Gille Monte Ruici

(via procrastinaut)

1:12 pm
305 notes
Our pal Diane (=Craftypod) checks out a brand of glue made from recycled styrofoam:

The founders of Glu6 contacted me about their new glue made from recycled styrofoam, and I was immediately intrigued. They’re sourcing the styro from local businesses in the Bay Area (near San Francisco) – material from packaging, mostly. Styrofoam occupies landfills pretty much forever, so I love the idea of turning it into something useful!
The Glu6 folks were kind enough to send me samples of two formulas with applications for crafters: the Glu6 Craft Paste, and the Glu6 Original liquid glue. I dug around in my stash and came up with a range of materials to test them out. Here are my findings….

There are some caveats, but Diane concludes that “Glu6 Craft Paste is dandy for paper crafts in particular.” Check out her full take here: Review: Glu6, a Glue Made From Recycled Styrofoam « CraftyPod

Our pal Diane (=Craftypod) checks out a brand of glue made from recycled styrofoam:

The founders of Glu6 contacted me about their new glue made from recycled styrofoam, and I was immediately intrigued. They’re sourcing the styro from local businesses in the Bay Area (near San Francisco) – material from packaging, mostly. Styrofoam occupies landfills pretty much forever, so I love the idea of turning it into something useful!

The Glu6 folks were kind enough to send me samples of two formulas with applications for crafters: the Glu6 Craft Paste, and the Glu6 Original liquid glue. I dug around in my stash and came up with a range of materials to test them out. Here are my findings….

There are some caveats, but Diane concludes that “Glu6 Craft Paste is dandy for paper crafts in particular.” Check out her full take here: Review: Glu6, a Glue Made From Recycled Styrofoam « CraftyPod

11:00 am - Mon, Sep 9, 2013
53 notes
You know we are fans of Little Free Libraries. So: This is cool! 

Little Free Library / NYC Ten installations by design teams:Cevan Castle; The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture’s Design III studio; Davies Tang + Toews; Stereotank; Shannon Harvey, Adam Michaels, and Levi Murphy; studio point 0; stpmj; Matter Practice; Chat Travieso; Mark Rakatansky Studio May 4 – September 1, 2013On view and available for use at locations across the East Village and Lower East Side. Download a PDF of the map.

via The Architectural League of New York | Little Free Library / NYC
The project officially ended on September 1,” says FastCoExist, ” but a few community partners have agreed to hold onto the libraries for longer.

You know we are fans of Little Free Libraries. So: This is cool!

Little Free Library / NYC
Ten installations by design teams:
Cevan CastleThe Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture’s Design III studioDavies Tang + ToewsStereotankShannon HarveyAdam Michaels, and Levi Murphystudio point 0; stpmj; Matter PracticeChat TraviesoMark Rakatansky Studio May 4 – September 1, 2013
On view and available for use at locations across the East Village and Lower East Side. Download a PDF of the map.

via The Architectural League of New York | Little Free Library / NYC

The project officially ended on September 1,” says FastCoExist, ” but a few community partners have agreed to hold onto the libraries for longer.

11:00 am - Fri, Sep 6, 2013
190 notes

The most annoying aspect of recycling—and one of the biggest hurdles to its widespread adoption—is having to separate paper, glass, and plastic before they hit the curb. New recycling machines are changing that. With single-stream recycling, recyclables go into one bin, which a truck delivers to a materials-recovery facility, such as Willimantic Waste Paper in Willimantic, Connecticut. There, a largely automated system of conveyor belts, screens, magnets, and lasers separates materials so that they can be sold to metal and plastic recyclers and paper mills.
Of the 570 recycling facilities in the U.S., 240 now have single-stream operations, according to Eileen Berenyi, of the solid-waste research-and-consulting firm Governmental Advisory Associates. While the system isn’t perfect—its high-speed operation can lead to contamination from broken glass—the simplicity of it means households actually recycle more.

More: How It Works: Inside The Machine That Separates Your Recyclables | Popular Science

The most annoying aspect of recycling—and one of the biggest hurdles to its widespread adoption—is having to separate paper, glass, and plastic before they hit the curb. New recycling machines are changing that. With single-stream recycling, recyclables go into one bin, which a truck delivers to a materials-recovery facility, such as Willimantic Waste Paper in Willimantic, Connecticut. There, a largely automated system of conveyor belts, screens, magnets, and lasers separates materials so that they can be sold to metal and plastic recyclers and paper mills.

Of the 570 recycling facilities in the U.S., 240 now have single-stream operations, according to Eileen Berenyi, of the solid-waste research-and-consulting firm Governmental Advisory Associates. While the system isn’t perfect—its high-speed operation can lead to contamination from broken glass—the simplicity of it means households actually recycle more.

More: How It Works: Inside The Machine That Separates Your Recyclables | Popular Science

10:03 am
34 notes
The other day we highlighted artist Francisco de Pájaro aka Art is Trash practice of transforming “piles of garbage left out in the streets into bizarre looking creatures.” Now, news of a Berlin-based trash-into-street art project, on FastCoexist:

Since 2011, German art collective Bosso Fataka has been taking pieces of found street trash and hoisting them into elaborate sculptures suspended in plastic. Once, Bosso Fataka found the hull of an old car and managed to suspend it between two five-foot walls using 70 rolls of cling wrap. Other projects have featured old mattresses bound to big gates and shopping carts barnacled to trees. Some of their installations include living, breathing, human beings, wrapped in plastic.

The other day we highlighted artist Francisco de Pájaro aka Art is Trash practice of transforming “piles of garbage left out in the streets into bizarre looking creatures.” Now, news of a Berlin-based trash-into-street art project, on FastCoexist:

Since 2011, German art collective Bosso Fataka has been taking pieces of found street trash and hoisting them into elaborate sculptures suspended in plastic. Once, Bosso Fataka found the hull of an old car and managed to suspend it between two five-foot walls using 70 rolls of cling wrap. Other projects have featured old mattresses bound to big gates and shopping carts barnacled to trees. Some of their installations include living, breathing, human beings, wrapped in plastic.

11:00 am - Thu, Sep 5, 2013
69 notes
What If We Grew Our Shoes Instead of Making Them? | Wired Design | Wired.com

Designer Liz Ciokajlo, inspired by [Earth Shoe inventor] Anna Kalsø, has developed a collection of Earthy footwear that transforms her intellectual passions into stylish, sustainable shoes.
Called Natural Selection, the collection was inspired by advances in synthetic biology and 3-D printing technology. Ciokajlo has a dream of one day being able to “grow” shoes, but realizes there are many experiments still to be conducted before Jimmy Choo’s can be produced from cultured cells.

Interesting line of  thought, to say the least!

What If We Grew Our Shoes Instead of Making Them? | Wired Design | Wired.com

Designer Liz Ciokajlo, inspired by [Earth Shoe inventor] Anna Kalsø, has developed a collection of Earthy footwear that transforms her intellectual passions into stylish, sustainable shoes.

Called Natural Selection, the collection was inspired by advances in synthetic biology and 3-D printing technology. Ciokajlo has a dream of one day being able to “grow” shoes, but realizes there are many experiments still to be conducted before Jimmy Choo’s can be produced from cultured cells.

Interesting line of  thought, to say the least!

12:20 pm - Wed, Sep 4, 2013
142 notes
thrashion:

Making some more of these this week #recycled #skateboard USB drive I’m making these bullet ones and then some smaller ones too #recycledskateboards (at Thrashion Recycled Skateboard Jewellery)

thrashion:

Making some more of these this week #recycled #skateboard USB drive I’m making these bullet ones and then some smaller ones too #recycledskateboards (at Thrashion Recycled Skateboard Jewellery)

(via thingsrecycledusefully)

10:00 am
404 notes

junkculture:

Japanese artist Natsumi Tomita utilises scraps of materials collected from the streets to create extremely imaginative animal sculptures that share an uncanny resemblance with their real-life counterparts.
Speaking about her work she says, “Each of these things, which we usually use everyday, once had a story, until they were thrown away. There are bicycles that were once ridden, broken dustpans, signboards from loan sharks, lost umbrellas. Every object had purpose and meaning before they were tossed away. Taking these things that I collect, I connect them and create new life from them.”
3:54 pm - Tue, Sep 3, 2013
92 notes
bossbrownmark:

Bold and beautiful, the chameleon clock adds fun and interest to any decor. Made from found and re-purposed materials no two are exactly alike. Order one of your own from Boss Brown Art.
One of many clocks made by Boss Brown Art Studios

bossbrownmark:

Bold and beautiful, the chameleon clock adds fun and interest to any decor. Made from found and re-purposed materials no two are exactly alike. Order one of your own from Boss Brown Art.

One of many clocks made by Boss Brown Art Studios

(via thingsrecycledusefully)

10:00 am - Wed, Aug 28, 2013
46 notes
We have pointed to Andrew Baseman’s Past Imperfect: The Art of Inventive Repair, a couple of times in the past. The excellent Discard Studies takes up his work in a thoughtful post that ties it to other examples of fixing: 

The Past Imperfect collection has the potential to do some critical work. Museum and collection logic are premised on preservation. Yet, here are examples of repair that “preserve” materials along lines separate from authenticity and prioritization, the mainstays of art/design history. While some museums are bringing repaired items into their collections, often the repairs are authenticated and dated in parallel with the original pieces.
I fear that the museumization of repairs takes the teeth out of some of their most useful critical work. The aesthetics that arise from practices of hacking, Jerry-rigging, and making-do are notable because the strength of their transport into the 21st century is not rooted in just their beauty or articulation of morals or values or politics of repair. Instead, they can work as a politics of critique by providing a counter example to material relations. If that counter example were to live, rather than be shelved and viewed from afar as precious objects, it would have more potential to work in the world. This is where the Fixers Collective, iFixit, Repair Cafes and la creation populaire come in. They do the living work of Inventive Repair, bringing some of Strasser’s call for present day stewardship into being.
If this counter example were to actually scale, from the hobbyist or museum specialist to the mundane and everyday, then we might have a material revolution on our hands.

Check out the whole pots here: Inventive repair, or, the aesthetics of material hacks « Discard Studies

We have pointed to Andrew Baseman’s Past Imperfect: The Art of Inventive Repair, a couple of times in the past. The excellent Discard Studies takes up his work in a thoughtful post that ties it to other examples of fixing:

The Past Imperfect collection has the potential to do some critical work. Museum and collection logic are premised on preservation. Yet, here are examples of repair that “preserve” materials along lines separate from authenticity and prioritization, the mainstays of art/design history. While some museums are bringing repaired items into their collections, often the repairs are authenticated and dated in parallel with the original pieces.

I fear that the museumization of repairs takes the teeth out of some of their most useful critical work. The aesthetics that arise from practices of hacking, Jerry-rigging, and making-do are notable because the strength of their transport into the 21st century is not rooted in just their beauty or articulation of morals or values or politics of repair. Instead, they can work as a politics of critique by providing a counter example to material relations. If that counter example were to live, rather than be shelved and viewed from afar as precious objects, it would have more potential to work in the world. This is where the Fixers Collective, iFixit, Repair Cafes and la creation populaire come in. They do the living work of Inventive Repair, bringing some of Strasser’s call for present day stewardship into being.

If this counter example were to actually scale, from the hobbyist or museum specialist to the mundane and everyday, then we might have a material revolution on our hands.

Check out the whole pots here: Inventive repair, or, the aesthetics of material hacks « Discard Studies

10:00 am - Tue, Aug 27, 2013
134 notes
Probably I have too many totebags as it is, and maybe you do, too. But this is one is pretty clever: 

The smart design of Notabag turns a tote—cotton or polyester—into a backpack with a quick pull on the straps. As long as you’re not on your way home from a big stock-up at BevMo, it should make trips back from the grocery store a heck of a lot smoother. A tug transforms it back again if you’d rather rock the one-shouldered look, and the whole thing folds up into sneaky interior pocket when you’re not on the go.


A perfect medium for our logo, no?
This Smart Transforming Tote Is the Only Grocery Bag You’ll Ever Need

Probably I have too many totebags as it is, and maybe you do, too. But this is one is pretty clever:

The smart design of Notabag turns a tote—cotton or polyester—into a backpack with a quick pull on the straps. As long as you’re not on your way home from a big stock-up at BevMo, it should make trips back from the grocery store a heck of a lot smoother. A tug transforms it back again if you’d rather rock the one-shouldered look, and the whole thing folds up into sneaky interior pocket when you’re not on the go.

A perfect medium for our logo, no?

This Smart Transforming Tote Is the Only Grocery Bag You’ll Ever Need

Install Headline