4:39 pm - Mon, Sep 8, 2014
65 notes

Israeli designer Lou Moria has used a vacuum-forming process to create pairs of plastic slippers that can be produced quickly and cheaply. 
[The shoes can] be created from a single piece of recyclable rubbery plastic. [This responded to] research on cheap shoes, which often comprise many different materials and are assembled as part of a long process.
[In this instance] the designer creates the shoes using vacuum forming technology. A plastic sheet is heated until it is soft and draped over a mould inside the forming machine. … 
Waste pieces of the material can be recycled and used to create more shoes, which are available in any colour.

Fascinating! More here, including a video: Lou Moria uses vacuum forming to create recyclable shoes in seconds

Israeli designer Lou Moria has used a vacuum-forming process to create pairs of plastic slippers that can be produced quickly and cheaply.

[The shoes can] be created from a single piece of recyclable rubbery plastic. [This responded to] research on cheap shoes, which often comprise many different materials and are assembled as part of a long process.

[In this instance] the designer creates the shoes using vacuum forming technology. A plastic sheet is heated until it is soft and draped over a mould inside the forming machine. …

Waste pieces of the material can be recycled and used to create more shoes, which are available in any colour.

Fascinating! More here, including a video: Lou Moria uses vacuum forming to create recyclable shoes in seconds

12:20 pm - Sun, Sep 7, 2014
37 notes
From designer Dirk Vander Kooij:

It looks like a brilliant gold colored celestial body, but it’s a lamp made out of recycled synthetics and metal.
The form is derived from the Fresnel lens - a special lens that concentrates light into a relatively narrow beam which is used in for instance lighthouses, searchlights and navigation lights.

(via Fresnel Pending Lamp by Dirk Vander Kooij)

From designer Dirk Vander Kooij:

It looks like a brilliant gold colored celestial body, but it’s a lamp made out of recycled synthetics and metal.

The form is derived from the Fresnel lens - a special lens that concentrates light into a relatively narrow beam which is used in for instance lighthouses, searchlights and navigation lights.

(via Fresnel Pending Lamp by Dirk Vander Kooij)

6:04 pm - Fri, Sep 5, 2014
76 notes

The Quick, Easy, Dangerous Way to Get a Washing Machine to Disassemble Itself for Recycling - Core77:

Australia-based machinist Ed Jones runs Ed Systems, a “Strange and somewhat crazy hobby shop that specializes in anything electrical, industrial, automotive, and anything in-between.” 

As part of his work he needs to disassemble machinery for recycling, so when it came time to break down a Whirlpool, Jones opted for an easier method than de-wrenching it.

Basically, because he also has a YouTube channel, he decided to rig the thing to destroy itself. Jones tells Core77 that the object was ruined anyway, so scrapping it in this absurd manner was as good a way as any to reduce it to scrap materials.

Noted: “There is an entire subgenre on YouTube dedicated to the engineered self-destruction of washing machines.”

5:59 pm
72 notes
The Art of “Kipple”
A project from photographer Dan Tobin Smith was evidently inspired by Philp K. Dick’s notion of “Kipple”

"Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday’s homeopape [newspaper]. When nobody’s around, kipple reproduces itself… the entire universe is moving towards a final state of total, absolute kippleization." From Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

According to Creative Review, Tobin Smith set out to “create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects.”So there was an open call for stuff people didn’t want anymore. And now: 

Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
The concept of kipple, says Tobin Smith, “inspired me to start thinking about design and products – we make so much stuff but we’ve got limited resources. Often it’s bound up with taste, we think because it’s beautiful it’s okay – but if it’s useless, it’s useless.”

More here: Creative Review - Dan Tobin Smith’s art of useless objects

The Art of “Kipple”

A project from photographer Dan Tobin Smith was evidently inspired by Philp K. Dick’s notion of “Kipple”

"Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday’s homeopape [newspaper]. When nobody’s around, kipple reproduces itself… the entire universe is moving towards a final state of total, absolute kippleization." From Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

According to Creative Review, Tobin Smith set out to “create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects.”So there was an open call for stuff people didn’t want anymore. And now:

Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.

The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.

The concept of kipple, says Tobin Smith, “inspired me to start thinking about design and products – we make so much stuff but we’ve got limited resources. Often it’s bound up with taste, we think because it’s beautiful it’s okay – but if it’s useless, it’s useless.”

More here: Creative Review - Dan Tobin Smith’s art of useless objects

12:20 pm - Wed, Sep 3, 2014
51 notes


Using debris in abandoned houses, dutch artist Marjan Teeuwen carefully stacks tiles, rocks, furniture, books and other collected bits and pieces into spectacular installations. 
via mymodernmet


More here: Juxtapoz Magazine - Marjan Teeuwen Uses Debris to Transform Abandoned Houses

Using debris in abandoned houses, dutch artist Marjan Teeuwen carefully stacks tiles, rocks, furniture, books and other collected bits and pieces into spectacular installations. 

More here: Juxtapoz Magazine - Marjan Teeuwen Uses Debris to Transform Abandoned Houses

3:40 pm - Tue, Sep 2, 2014
100 notes
What happens to your beer can after you recycle it? Here’s What Happens To Your Beer Can After You Recycle It
Surprisingly interesting step-by-step breakdown!

What happens to your beer can after you recycle it? Here’s What Happens To Your Beer Can After You Recycle It

Surprisingly interesting step-by-step breakdown!

12:20 pm
34 notes

The other day I caught Noah and Charlotte (my two youngest) using some vintage picture books as their personal art canvases. And I mean the paper-tearing, marker-smearing, no-mercy kind of art.
Once I recovered from the initial devastation, it dawned on me that every form of destruction is also an opportunity for creation: why not use those “destroyed” children’s books as the canvas for wall art?
Personalized signs spelling out your child’s name add a cute touch to a cozy reading nook.
This is our new favorite project and we can’t wait to share how easy it is to make!

More: How-Tuesday: Upcycled Book Art | The Etsy Blog

The other day I caught Noah and Charlotte (my two youngest) using some vintage picture books as their personal art canvases. And I mean the paper-tearing, marker-smearing, no-mercy kind of art.

Once I recovered from the initial devastation, it dawned on me that every form of destruction is also an opportunity for creation: why not use those “destroyed” children’s books as the canvas for wall art?

Personalized signs spelling out your child’s name add a cute touch to a cozy reading nook.

This is our new favorite project and we can’t wait to share how easy it is to make!

More: How-Tuesday: Upcycled Book Art | The Etsy Blog

3:40 pm - Mon, Sep 1, 2014
499 notes
laughingsquid:

Japanese artist Makaon uses aluminum cans to make delightful figure sculptures of characters from video games, movies, and other pop culture sources. He has more aluminum can sculptures on his website and blog.
Delightful Aluminum Can Sculptures of Pop Culture Characters

laughingsquid:

Japanese artist Makaon uses aluminum cans to make delightful figure sculptures of characters from video games, movies, and other pop culture sources. He has more aluminum can sculptures on his website and blog.

Delightful Aluminum Can Sculptures of Pop Culture Characters

12:08 pm - Thu, Aug 28, 2014
121 notes
A don’t-buy-stuff phone! … that says, among other things, “That’s right, I recommend that you don’t buy stuff!”
And going one step further: “Don’t even buy me! Your current phone is awesome!”
Gotta say this The Joy of Tech comic poking fun at smartphones, namely Amazon’s own smartphone, made me smile.

A don’t-buy-stuff phone! … that says, among other things, “That’s right, I recommend that you don’t buy stuff!”

And going one step further: “Don’t even buy me! Your current phone is awesome!”

Gotta say this The Joy of Tech comic poking fun at smartphones, namely Amazon’s own smartphone, made me smile.

7:57 am - Wed, Aug 27, 2014
216 notes
Pill bottle art.
(Repurposed prescription pill bottles and a pine box.) 
Artist: Elizabeth Lundberg Morisette, a.k.a. clementine mom on Flickr.

Pill bottle art.

(Repurposed prescription pill bottles and a pine box.) 

Artist: Elizabeth Lundberg Morisette, a.k.a. clementine mom on Flickr.

8:03 am - Mon, Aug 25, 2014
11,574 notes
theonion:



Experts: “We can just keep using the chairs we have.”


"According to the report, chair production can cease entirely with no negative consequences for American consumers, as the many good chairs now on store shelves and available at garage sales are sufficient to satisfy the country’s seating requirements for the immediate future." 
Amusing. And a good reminder that so many existing items can be found in second-hand shops and/or in antique stores, listed on Craigslist, Freecycle, eBay, and even found in many of your friends’ homes and/or those of family members (“hi, Dad!”); so why would consumers need to buy newly made merchandise?!
Yeah, reuse! 

theonion:

"According to the report, chair production can cease entirely with no negative consequences for American consumers, as the many good chairs now on store shelves and available at garage sales are sufficient to satisfy the country’s seating requirements for the immediate future." 

Amusing. And a good reminder that so many existing items can be found in second-hand shops and/or in antique stores, listed on Craigslist, Freecycle, eBay, and even found in many of your friends’ homes and/or those of family members (“hi, Dad!”); so why would consumers need to buy newly made merchandise?!

Yeah, reuse! 

3:40 pm - Sun, Aug 24, 2014
27 notes
Many compelling nuggets in this account of a panel discussion on NYC’s recycling-management infrastructure — lots of improvements, but lots more that could be done (and is under consideration — such as, above, a pneumatic-transfer system connected to the High Line!).
The whole thing is interesting but something that jumped out to me:

Spertus acknowledges the massive contribution of the new Sims plant in Brooklyn.
But it can only be as good as its inputs, and our recycling rate remains stubbornly low. She wonders why the city, which has proven so adept at squeezing public benefits like parks and space for schools out of a feverish development climate, cannot prioritize waste infrastructure using the same methods.
Nagle goes further. She suggests a complete rethinking of our manufacturing and consumption processes is needed to stem our nation’s great tide of trash and urge us to revalue our material possessions. We must begin to internalize the externalities our wasteful culture inflicts on the environment. 

Read the rest here: Urban Omnibus » Wasted: The Future of New York’s Garbage

Many compelling nuggets in this account of a panel discussion on NYC’s recycling-management infrastructure — lots of improvements, but lots more that could be done (and is under consideration — such as, above, a pneumatic-transfer system connected to the High Line!).

The whole thing is interesting but something that jumped out to me:

Spertus acknowledges the massive contribution of the new Sims plant in Brooklyn.

But it can only be as good as its inputs, and our recycling rate remains stubbornly low. She wonders why the city, which has proven so adept at squeezing public benefits like parks and space for schools out of a feverish development climate, cannot prioritize waste infrastructure using the same methods.

Nagle goes further. She suggests a complete rethinking of our manufacturing and consumption processes is needed to stem our nation’s great tide of trash and urge us to revalue our material possessions. We must begin to internalize the externalities our wasteful culture inflicts on the environment.

Read the rest here: Urban Omnibus » Wasted: The Future of New York’s Garbage

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