3:40 pm - Sun, Jul 20, 2014
143 notes
Here’s one of the more interesting quasi-unconsumption branding tactics I’ve encountered: Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh has been talking up the benefits of not washing your jeans: 

In a post on LinkedIn called “The Dirty Jeans Manifesto,” Bergh explains both the environmental and durability benefits of never washing your jeans.
"We learned that an average pair of jeans consumes roughly 3,500 liters of water – and that is after only two years of use, washing the jeans once a week," Bergh writes. "Nearly half of the total water consumption, or 1,600 liters, is the consumer throwing the jeans in the washing machine. That’s equivalent to 6,700 glasses of drinking water!"
He adds that not washing them also helps them to last longer.

More here (including what to do about stains, and the benefits of freezing jeans as a cleaning alternative): Levi’s CEO Explains Why Not To Wash Your Jeans | HUH.

Here’s one of the more interesting quasi-unconsumption branding tactics I’ve encountered: Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh has been talking up the benefits of not washing your jeans:

In a post on LinkedIn called “The Dirty Jeans Manifesto,” Bergh explains both the environmental and durability benefits of never washing your jeans.

"We learned that an average pair of jeans consumes roughly 3,500 liters of water – and that is after only two years of use, washing the jeans once a week," Bergh writes. "Nearly half of the total water consumption, or 1,600 liters, is the consumer throwing the jeans in the washing machine. That’s equivalent to 6,700 glasses of drinking water!"

He adds that not washing them also helps them to last longer.

More here (including what to do about stains, and the benefits of freezing jeans as a cleaning alternative): Levi’s CEO Explains Why Not To Wash Your Jeans | HUH.

12:20 pm
58 notes

Colten Jackson [is out to] spread the word about his educational side project, Electric Waste Orchestra.

Jackson reuses e-waste to make music in unconventional ways—for example, in this video he transformed six hard-drives and a number pad into a musical instrument (with help from Arduino hardware and Pure Data software) and jams along with a modular synthesizer.

More: Electric Waste Orchestra - Cool Hunting

3:40 pm - Sat, Jul 19, 2014
36 notes
Earlier we mentioned the event World Design Capital 2014. Here’s a follow up: 

A spectacular structure, designed by Dutch design studio Droog and made entirely of salvaged materials, pops up in Cape Town this week for the Department of Design, a temporary hub connecting Dutch and South African designers as part of World Design Capital 2014

More: Lookbook: Department of Design | Design Indaba

Earlier we mentioned the event World Design Capital 2014. Here’s a follow up:

A spectacular structure, designed by Dutch design studio Droog and made entirely of salvaged materials, pops up in Cape Town this week for the Department of Design, a temporary hub connecting Dutch and South African designers as part of World Design Capital 2014

More: Lookbook: Department of Design | Design Indaba

12:20 pm
99 notes

Skyscrapers don’t build themselves, but the designers at French architecture firm Chartier-Corbosson might have come up with the next best thing: London Organic Skyscraper, if realized, would constantly grow using, as building material, the recycled waste of its residents.

(via Eco-Skyscraper Concept Grows From The Recycled Garbage Of Its Occupants | The Creators Project)

Skyscrapers don’t build themselves, but the designers at French architecture firm Chartier-Corbosson might have come up with the next best thing: London Organic Skyscraper, if realized, would constantly grow using, as building material, the recycled waste of its residents.

(via Eco-Skyscraper Concept Grows From The Recycled Garbage Of Its Occupants | The Creators Project)

3:40 pm - Fri, Jul 18, 2014
63 notes
Hank by llot llov is an “adjustable harness” that converts unused little mirrors into decorative wall pieces. More: Hank Harness by llot llov

Hank by llot llov is an “adjustable harness” that converts unused little mirrors into decorative wall pieces. More: Hank Harness by llot llov

12:20 pm
57 notes

Do you see the size of this Reclaimed Wood Tree Swing? Sure, there’s a little kid in the photo, but it’s still pretty sturdy in terms of length, width, and depth.
Made from salvaged antique flooring, this swing from Peg and Awl has a vintage look that will fit in any backyard, especially when hung from a large tree branch.
Natural tung oil keeps the seat water resistant and a five-loop fisherman’s knot secures the rope.

More: Reclaimed Wood Tree Swing — ACCESSORIES — Better Living Through Design

Do you see the size of this Reclaimed Wood Tree Swing? Sure, there’s a little kid in the photo, but it’s still pretty sturdy in terms of length, width, and depth.

Made from salvaged antique flooring, this swing from Peg and Awl has a vintage look that will fit in any backyard, especially when hung from a large tree branch.

Natural tung oil keeps the seat water resistant and a five-loop fisherman’s knot secures the rope.

More: Reclaimed Wood Tree Swing — ACCESSORIES — Better Living Through Design

3:40 pm - Thu, Jul 17, 2014
95 notes

If you visited Governor’s Island in New York last summer you most certainly saw the billowing, cloud-like structure that sits in the middle of the lawn. …
It’s not until you get up close that you realize it’s made from many, many plastic bottles stringed together. “53,780 used plastic bottles,” says designer Jason Klimoski, “the number thrown away in NYC in just 1 hour.” Klimoski and his team at STUDIO KCA collected the bottles – a combination of milk jugs and water bottles – and lashed them together to create “Head in the Clouds,” a pavilion people can walk into, sit inside, and contemplate just how much plastic is thrown away every day.
The structure … is now looking for its next home. If you’re interested in having this in your back yard get in touch with the designers.

More: A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC | Colossal

If you visited Governor’s Island in New York last summer you most certainly saw the billowing, cloud-like structure that sits in the middle of the lawn. …

It’s not until you get up close that you realize it’s made from many, many plastic bottles stringed together. “53,780 used plastic bottles,” says designer Jason Klimoski, “the number thrown away in NYC in just 1 hour.” Klimoski and his team at STUDIO KCA collected the bottles – a combination of milk jugs and water bottles – and lashed them together to create “Head in the Clouds,” a pavilion people can walk into, sit inside, and contemplate just how much plastic is thrown away every day.

The structure … is now looking for its next home. If you’re interested in having this in your back yard get in touch with the designers.

More: A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC | Colossal

12:20 pm
112 notes

When your smartphone reaches the end of its brief life, what will become of it? Will it be pawned off onto an unappreciative relative, or will it be discarded, its toxic innards eventually seeping into the earth?
Or, will it become a champion of conservation? Rainforest Connection, a San Francisco-based nonprofit with a new Kickstarter campaign out, is converting old phones into devices to detect illegal logging and poaching in the rainforest in real-time.

Again, we don’t normally tout Kickstarter stuff here, but this has already hit its goal, and sounds fascinating. More here: A Network of Recycled Phones Is Listening for Illegal Logging in the Rainforest | Motherboard

When your smartphone reaches the end of its brief life, what will become of it? Will it be pawned off onto an unappreciative relative, or will it be discarded, its toxic innards eventually seeping into the earth?

Or, will it become a champion of conservation? Rainforest Connection, a San Francisco-based nonprofit with a new Kickstarter campaign out, is converting old phones into devices to detect illegal logging and poaching in the rainforest in real-time.

Again, we don’t normally tout Kickstarter stuff here, but this has already hit its goal, and sounds fascinating. More here: A Network of Recycled Phones Is Listening for Illegal Logging in the Rainforest | Motherboard

3:40 pm - Wed, Jul 16, 2014
186 notes

The Grotesque Apple, the Ridiculous Potato, the Failed Lemon.

This great video describes a campaign to, in essence, rebrand the imperfect-looking fruits and vegetables that are normally thrown out, into something special and unique.

Now you can eat five a day inglorious fruits and vegetables. As good, but 30% cheaper. The inglorious Fruits&Vegetables, a glorious fight against food waste.

Watch the video! Very clever!

(Source: youtube.com)

2:30 pm
37 notes
Here’s a fun contest that involves reusing electronic components:

Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).:
Send your photos or videos to sustainability_contest@sparkfun.com.
Submissions will be accepted until Friday August 1st.
The winner will receive $100 in SparkFun credit!

More details: Reused parts contest! - News - SparkFun Electronics

Here’s a fun contest that involves reusing electronic components:

Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).:

More details: Reused parts contest! - News - SparkFun Electronics

3:40 pm - Mon, Jul 14, 2014
113 notes

Selling Utah State University students on a new ‘Blue Goes Green’ fee to fund sustainability projects on campus has involved connecting sustainability with the students’ desires for freedom, saving money, physical fitness, and love.

More: Framing Sustainability for the Free, Frugal, and Fit & Fabulous | Solutions

Selling Utah State University students on a new ‘Blue Goes Green’ fee to fund sustainability projects on campus has involved connecting sustainability with the students’ desires for freedom, saving money, physical fitness, and love.

More: Framing Sustainability for the Free, Frugal, and Fit & Fabulous | Solutions

12:20 pm
57 notes

Dust is a collection of jewellery that allows the wearer to experience themes of transformation and disintegration. In this world everything existing is linked to the process of birth, decay and  disappearance. That is the way of life, the way of nature. Inspired by the tradition of the symbolic Vanitas paintings, the Dust collection is a reminder of the transience of all earthly pursuits and how it can be a motive for design.
 
This ideology led to an exploration of how to break traditions and create new ways in material use. It is a reflection on material worth. A contemplation for the constant transformation of matter.  We always demand that everything should be flawless but in the end, everything is dust or in time becomes dust. Is it possible to make use of materials that have always been considered nothing more than useless dirt?

More here: Dust
Dust is a collection of jewellery that allows the wearer to experience themes of transformation and disintegration. In this world everything existing is linked to the process of birth, decay and  disappearance. That is the way of life, the way of nature. Inspired by the tradition of the symbolic Vanitas paintings, the Dust collection is a reminder of the transience of all earthly pursuits and how it can be a motive for design.
 
This ideology led to an exploration of how to break traditions and create new ways in material use. It is a reflection on material worth. A contemplation for the constant transformation of matter.  We always demand that everything should be flawless but in the end, everything is dust or in time becomes dust. Is it possible to make use of materials that have always been considered nothing more than useless dirt?

More here: Dust

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