12:20 pm - Tue, Oct 7, 2014
137 notes

London’s red telephone boxes of yore are largely disused, although recent initiatives have seen some converted into miniature libraries or equipped with emergency medical equipment.
This is the phone box’s highest-tech renovation revolution, with the chosen boxes painted green and fitted with a roof-mounted solar panel.

More: London’s red phone boxes go green, are converted into solar-powered phone chargers - Gadgets and Tech - Life and Style - The Independent

London’s red telephone boxes of yore are largely disused, although recent initiatives have seen some converted into miniature libraries or equipped with emergency medical equipment.

This is the phone box’s highest-tech renovation revolution, with the chosen boxes painted green and fitted with a roof-mounted solar panel.

More: London’s red phone boxes go green, are converted into solar-powered phone chargers - Gadgets and Tech - Life and Style - The Independent

3:40 pm - Mon, Oct 6, 2014
29 notes

The Times follows up this story with a guide to options for properly disposing of you own phone. Read that here.

GameStop, a video game retailer that buys and sells used electronics and games, said it held a trade-in event last weekend. In three days, it accepted more than 15,000 devices. The items that were traded in the most included the more recent iPhones, like the 5, 5S and 5C, the company said.

EcoATM, a company that buys used cellphones through a network of kiosks, said that since the release of the iPhone on Friday, it had seen an 80 percent increase in iPhone trade-ins at its 1,100 kiosks in the United States. It declined to say how many devices it accepted over all.

Gazelle, a reseller that allows people to mail in their used electronics for cash back or credit on Amazon, said it was making 180 offers a minute in the week leading up to the release of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus on Friday. The iPhone 5 accounted for 38 percent of the devices being traded in ahead of the release. Gazelle also noted that in the week Apple introduced the latest iPhones, the number of trade-ins of Samsung products tripled compared with the week before.

Many older devices are not traded in at all. A study by OnePoll, a research company, found that about 54 percent of American consumers say they own two or more unused cellphones. The study estimates that Americans own about $34 billion worth of used cellphones.

Apple also offers a trade-in program at its stores, working with Brightstar, a company that buys and sells used electronics.

12:20 pm
41 notes

[This shoe] collection exclusively incorporates ‘rare’, ‘vintage’ and ‘ultra rare’ iconic retro textiles from the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and 90’s reclaimed from seats on London’s Underground tube carriages and buses.
Realising these visually striking fabrics were genuine relics of London’s design heritage, Central Saint Martin’s college graduate Robert Taylor and music promoter/film maker Caroline Read collected and preserved them before they were lost to landfill or incineration forever!


London’s first environment-conscious footwear range; Above+Below London™, is the evolution of this innovative recycling project, begun by the duo over ten years ago.

More: About Us

[This shoe] collection exclusively incorporates ‘rare’, ‘vintage’ and ‘ultra rare’ iconic retro textiles from the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and 90’s reclaimed from seats on London’s Underground tube carriages and buses.

Realising these visually striking fabrics were genuine relics of London’s design heritage, Central Saint Martin’s college graduate Robert Taylor and music promoter/film maker Caroline Read collected and preserved them before they were lost to landfill or incineration forever!

London’s first environment-conscious footwear range; Above+Below London™, is the evolution of this innovative recycling project, begun by the duo over ten years ago.

More: About Us

2:32 pm - Thu, Oct 2, 2014
95 notes

Bloomin Rubbish is delighted to be working with Disability Art Project Uganda (DAPU) to create a range of recycled bottle top clocks.

DAPU are now working to create a range of recycled bottle top clocks for sale in local craft markets and shops in Kampala. To get this project up and running DAPU need to buy essential tools and materials which are hard to come by in Uganda, including clock parts, cable ties and hand drills.

We’ve mentioned Bloomin Rubbish before — It’s a “pop up recycling project” created by (Unconsumption contributor!) Deirdre Nelson & Frances Priest in association with Covepark, involving creative reuse of castaway materials to make attractive new objects:

Bloomin Rubbish is about the importance of recycling materials, the fun of designing and making together and the need to raise awareness about the problem of plastic pollution.
Per above, project partner Frances Priest recently visited Disability Arts in Uganda, where a new collaboration is underway to make clocks from plastic bottle tops and lids in a Bloomin Rubbish Style.
While they’re working on prototypes, they’re looking for funding to buy drills, cable ties, clock motors and the like — to take the project to fruition, and create beautiful (sellable) remade objects.
Support their efforts here, via Go Fund Me.

10:00 am - Mon, Sep 29, 2014
90 notes

David Taylor has launched SLAG, a new collection of candlesticks made from, well, slag, a waste product found around in the forest surrounding the now-closed iron foundry in Hälleförsnäs.

The foundry has been around the village for the last 600 years or so and using the material just about like it was found pays homage to the history.

More: SLAG: Tabletop Objects by David Taylor - Design Milk

12:20 pm - Fri, Sep 26, 2014
49 notes
Edition 02 by Tino Valentinitsch was made with parquet salvaged from a ca. 1850 Bolognese industrial villa | MOCO LOCO Submissions

Basing on the premise that historical building materials are of special value, spolia. makes a point of ’misappropriating’ valuable materials and setting them in a contemporary context. The result is a limited edition series of selected furniture and objects in which the historical structural elements take center stage: fine craftsmanship which has not only gained in value over time but carries history within it.

Edition 02 by Tino Valentinitsch was made with parquet salvaged from a ca. 1850 Bolognese industrial villa | MOCO LOCO Submissions

Basing on the premise that historical building materials are of special value, spolia. makes a point of ’misappropriating’ valuable materials and setting them in a contemporary context. The result is a limited edition series of selected furniture and objects in which the historical structural elements take center stage: fine craftsmanship which has not only gained in value over time but carries history within it.

3:40 pm - Thu, Sep 25, 2014
64 notes

This fantastic set of paper insects was created from reclaimed paper by Belgium-based ad agency Soon for paper company IGEPA Benelux. … 
You can watch the entire Soon team toiling away on the project in this making of video.

(via Reclaimed Paper Insects by ‘Soon’ | Colossal)

This fantastic set of paper insects was created from reclaimed paper by Belgium-based ad agency Soon for paper company IGEPA Benelux. …

You can watch the entire Soon team toiling away on the project in this making of video.

(via Reclaimed Paper Insects by ‘Soon’ | Colossal)

12:20 pm - Wed, Sep 24, 2014
71 notes
Some more nice press for our friends over at TerraCycle:

According to New Jersey-based Terracycle, a business that makes consumer products from pre-consumer and post-consumer waste, 99% of the total material flow in the US becomes garbage within six months. Founder Tom Szaky says it is important to note that from a strictly material or scientific standpoint, everything can be recycled. The only barrier to something being considered “recyclable” in our society is economics. “For-profit waste management companies are allowed to define what is recyclable based on what is profitable for them to collect. That is why our recycling system is broken,” says Szaky.
Cigarettes, baby diapers, cheese wrappers and more find a second life through TerraCycle by people simply taking the time to get rid of waste they create on a regular basis. Enlisting in-house teams to separate cigarette waste into its most basic components, the organic waste (ash, tobacco and paper) can be used in tobacco-specific compost, while the plastic (the filter) can be re-heated, extruded, and turned back into plastic pellets. Recycled plastic pellets like these mitigate the need for virgin plastics, and can be used to make ashtrays or industrial products such as shipping pallets.

(via Chicken feathers and cigarette butts put to use in circular economy | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional)

Some more nice press for our friends over at TerraCycle:

According to New Jersey-based Terracycle, a business that makes consumer products from pre-consumer and post-consumer waste, 99% of the total material flow in the US becomes garbage within six months. Founder Tom Szaky says it is important to note that from a strictly material or scientific standpoint, everything can be recycled. The only barrier to something being considered “recyclable” in our society is economics. “For-profit waste management companies are allowed to define what is recyclable based on what is profitable for them to collect. That is why our recycling system is broken,” says Szaky.

Cigarettes, baby diapers, cheese wrappers and more find a second life through TerraCycle by people simply taking the time to get rid of waste they create on a regular basis. Enlisting in-house teams to separate cigarette waste into its most basic components, the organic waste (ash, tobacco and paper) can be used in tobacco-specific compost, while the plastic (the filter) can be re-heated, extruded, and turned back into plastic pellets. Recycled plastic pellets like these mitigate the need for virgin plastics, and can be used to make ashtrays or industrial products such as shipping pallets.

(via Chicken feathers and cigarette butts put to use in circular economy | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional)

3:40 pm - Tue, Sep 23, 2014
316 notes

Remember video cassettes, those big black boxes that played pictures? Rendered useless by DVDs, they’ve found a new purpose. Some 4,000 of them have built a house, along with two tonnes of denim jeans, 2,000 used carpet tiles and 20,000 toothbrushes.
The result is Britain’s first house made almost entirely from rubbish. Based at the University of Brighton, the house opened its doors in June and is a live research project, acting as a test-bed for new windows, solar panels, insulation and construction materials.

More: The house made from 4,000 video cassettes and two tonnes of jeans | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional

Remember video cassettes, those big black boxes that played pictures? Rendered useless by DVDs, they’ve found a new purpose. Some 4,000 of them have built a house, along with two tonnes of denim jeans, 2,000 used carpet tiles and 20,000 toothbrushes.

The result is Britain’s first house made almost entirely from rubbish. Based at the University of Brighton, the house opened its doors in June and is a live research project, acting as a test-bed for new windows, solar panels, insulation and construction materials.

More: The house made from 4,000 video cassettes and two tonnes of jeans | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional

12:20 pm
240 notes

Earlier this year, Canadian engineer Aidin Delnavaz placed a pair of industrial earmuffs on his head, adjusted a special strap beneath his chin, and waited for the material to start harvesting energy while he chewed gum for two minutes.
He only generated a small amount of wattage, but it was enough for the researchers to conclude that wearing the chin strap for the duration of a meal could power a small hearing aid for two hours.

More: These Canadians Invented A Chin Strap That Generates Energy When You Chew | Co.Exist | ideas impact

Earlier this year, Canadian engineer Aidin Delnavaz placed a pair of industrial earmuffs on his head, adjusted a special strap beneath his chin, and waited for the material to start harvesting energy while he chewed gum for two minutes.

He only generated a small amount of wattage, but it was enough for the researchers to conclude that wearing the chin strap for the duration of a meal could power a small hearing aid for two hours.

More: These Canadians Invented A Chin Strap That Generates Energy When You Chew | Co.Exist | ideas impact

3:40 pm - Mon, Sep 22, 2014
247 notes

We can’t really endorse this — but it’s something!

This video of an anonymous Russian girl on a motorbike returning people’s trash to them in the messiest way possible. We’ve got two potentials here: either YouTubers start mimicking her actions to effect a global change or this channel goes HUGE and she becomes a star YouTuber.

More: Will Punishing Litterbugs Be The New YouTube Revenge Trend?

12:20 pm
717 notes

No cardboard, no cellophane, no throwaway plastic trays, and no brands: Berlin’s newest supermarket is certainly a step away from the usual neighborhood grocery store.
Opened last Saturday, Original Unverpackt (the name translates to “Original Unpackaged”) is a novel shop in Berlin’s Kreuzberg neighborhood that has dispensed entirely with disposable packaging. Granted, the term “supermarket” might be a little grandiose for this small but tightly packed store, but the concept’s legs are as long as the store’s frontage is narrow.
Not only is a minimum-waste grocery store a canny business idea in a country that’s packed with green-conscious consumers, it’s also an interesting pilot project relevant to any city trying to cut their landfill and recycling burden.

 (via The Supermarket of the Future Has No Packaging - CityLab)

No cardboard, no cellophane, no throwaway plastic trays, and no brands: Berlin’s newest supermarket is certainly a step away from the usual neighborhood grocery store.

Opened last Saturday, Original Unverpackt (the name translates to “Original Unpackaged”) is a novel shop in Berlin’s Kreuzberg neighborhood that has dispensed entirely with disposable packaging. Granted, the term “supermarket” might be a little grandiose for this small but tightly packed store, but the concept’s legs are as long as the store’s frontage is narrow.

Not only is a minimum-waste grocery store a canny business idea in a country that’s packed with green-conscious consumers, it’s also an interesting pilot project relevant to any city trying to cut their landfill and recycling burden.

 (via The Supermarket of the Future Has No Packaging - CityLab)

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