Unconsumption

Sep 16


Here’s an admirable design solution to the idea of the physical business card:

Designer: Cameron MollMaterial: Crane Lettra, Pearl Production: Letterpress; hand-cut and hand-stamped Printer: Bryce Knudson, Bjorn Press
…. 
“[My] cards are individually cut from my letterpress type posters using inventory that is damaged in some way (ink splatter, bent corner, etc) and stamped by hand,” Moll says.
- See more at: http://www.howdesign.com/how-design-blog/best-business-cards#sthash.XMF6BxDT.dpuf

 (via 14 Best Business Cards in the Biz - HOW Design)

Here’s an admirable design solution to the idea of the physical business card:

Designer: Cameron Moll
Material: Crane Lettra, Pearl
Production: Letterpress; hand-cut and hand-stamped
Printer: Bryce Knudson, Bjorn Press

…. 

“[My] cards are individually cut from my letterpress type posters using inventory that is damaged in some way (ink splatter, bent corner, etc) and stamped by hand,” Moll says.

- See more at: http://www.howdesign.com/how-design-blog/best-business-cards#sthash.XMF6BxDT.dpuf

 (via 14 Best Business Cards in the Biz - HOW Design)

damonaholathesis: “Nice piece on my thesis work in The Guardian.”: 

When you think about how fashion will work alongside technology in the future, it might be hard to break from science-fiction-heavy ideas. However, fashionably using solar, wind and even kinetic energy to charge devices, keep us connected and even donate our energy to non-profits is being explored by a number of design houses.
….
Last winter, Damon Ahola, a recent graduate of the School of Visual Arts, MFA in Products of Design, was running on a treadmill at the gym watching people bobbing up and down on ellipticals, stair masters and bikes. “I thought we were all exerting a huge amount of energy while at the same time consuming a vast amount of electrical energy.” His gym observation led him to question how to take advantage of kinetic energy through a project called Harvest which investigated the potential of integrating energy harvesting into our lives. Ahola said he began by approaching the work from a user-centric point of view, initially exploring what activities are appropriate for energy harvesting.

damonaholathesis: “Nice piece on my thesis work in The Guardian.”:

When you think about how fashion will work alongside technology in the future, it might be hard to break from science-fiction-heavy ideas. However, fashionably using solar, wind and even kinetic energy to charge devices, keep us connected and even donate our energy to non-profits is being explored by a number of design houses.

….

Last winter, Damon Ahola, a recent graduate of the School of Visual Arts, MFA in Products of Design, was running on a treadmill at the gym watching people bobbing up and down on ellipticals, stair masters and bikes. “I thought we were all exerting a huge amount of energy while at the same time consuming a vast amount of electrical energy.” His gym observation led him to question how to take advantage of kinetic energy through a project called Harvest which investigated the potential of integrating energy harvesting into our lives. Ahola said he began by approaching the work from a user-centric point of view, initially exploring what activities are appropriate for energy harvesting.

Sep 15


The world’s first washing-up liquid bottle made from reclaimed ocean plastic is to go on sale in UK supermarkets later this month.
The green cleaning brand Ecover will use the launch of its new Ocean Bottle washing-up liquid to highlight the long-term dangers of dumping plastic in the sea, which is killing fish on a large scale and threatening global ecosystems.
Ecover, a Belgian company, has been working with manufacturer Logoplaste to combine plastic trawled from the sea with a plastic made from sugarcane (which it calls Plant-astic) and recycled plastic, in what it is hailing as a world-first for packaging.

More: Washing-up liquid bottle made from ocean plastic aims to clean up seas | Environment | The Guardian

The world’s first washing-up liquid bottle made from reclaimed ocean plastic is to go on sale in UK supermarkets later this month.

The green cleaning brand Ecover will use the launch of its new Ocean Bottle washing-up liquid to highlight the long-term dangers of dumping plastic in the sea, which is killing fish on a large scale and threatening global ecosystems.

Ecover, a Belgian company, has been working with manufacturer Logoplaste to combine plastic trawled from the sea with a plastic made from sugarcane (which it calls Plant-astic) and recycled plastic, in what it is hailing as a world-first for packaging.

More: Washing-up liquid bottle made from ocean plastic aims to clean up seas | Environment | The Guardian


Joint Perspectives, a young design studio based in London formed by María Meller and Mirja Sick, recently completed a sideboard inspired by discarded pieces of materials the encountered around the shop.

Using copper and oak, the irregularity of the pieces, which were laid side by side to create the design, has an intense visual impact.
The pieces of copper and oak are in different stages of their lives – from old weathered oak is matched up with sheets of copper left outside for a month. Each piece of oak was cut individually, so they don’t line up, creating a sculptural effect and hiding the storage inside.

More: Oak and Copper Sideboard by Joint Perspectives - Design Milk

Joint Perspectives, a young design studio based in London formed by María Meller and Mirja Sick, recently completed a sideboard inspired by discarded pieces of materials the encountered around the shop.

Using copper and oak, the irregularity of the pieces, which were laid side by side to create the design, has an intense visual impact.

The pieces of copper and oak are in different stages of their lives – from old weathered oak is matched up with sheets of copper left outside for a month. Each piece of oak was cut individually, so they don’t line up, creating a sculptural effect and hiding the storage inside.

More: Oak and Copper Sideboard by Joint Perspectives - Design Milk

Sep 14

Does Responsible Consumption Benefit Companies More Than Consumers? | Co.Exist | ideas impact -

Interesting read, touching on themes that come up here on Unconsmption all the time.

A new paper by Markus Giesler and Ela Veresiu, two researchers at York University’s Schulich School of Business, in Canada [argues] that responsible consumption subtly shifts responsibility for big problems to consumers, leaving corporations free to continue as usual.

Meanwhile, the people who should be changing the game—government and regulators—are left to one side.

There’s much to be said for us consumers (or unconsumers) doing our part. It’s true that government and regulators should, too.

But I’d emphasize that businesses, large and small, are among those who also “should be changing the game.”

Sep 10


Before it’s even time for dinner, the food-to-trash transfer has happened several times. Nixing that transfer entirely is the task at hand for Hannah Billqvist and Anna Glansén, who together are Swedish design group Tomorrow Machine.
Right now, the duo have a few inventions that fall under two novel approaches to sustainable packaging: food wrappers that can change shape to double as a dish or bowl, and packaging that’s meant to be composted or washed down the drain. 

More: 5 Futuristic Food Wrappers That You Don’t Have to Throw Away | Design | WIRED

Before it’s even time for dinner, the food-to-trash transfer has happened several times. Nixing that transfer entirely is the task at hand for Hannah Billqvist and Anna Glansén, who together are Swedish design group Tomorrow Machine.

Right now, the duo have a few inventions that fall under two novel approaches to sustainable packaging: food wrappers that can change shape to double as a dish or bowl, and packaging that’s meant to be composted or washed down the drain. 

More: 5 Futuristic Food Wrappers That You Don’t Have to Throw Away | Design | WIRED

Sep 09


The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.
A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.

A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

good:

Where New York’s trash went, 2012

Interesting, and rather blunt, follow-up to our recent post about NYC trash/recycling infrastructure, as well as this item addressing classifications of trash.

good:

Where New York’s trash went, 2012


Interesting, and rather blunt, follow-up to our recent post about NYC trash/recycling infrastructure, as well as this item addressing classifications of trash.

(via good)

Sep 08


Israeli designer Lou Moria has used a vacuum-forming process to create pairs of plastic slippers that can be produced quickly and cheaply. 
[The shoes can] be created from a single piece of recyclable rubbery plastic. [This responded to] research on cheap shoes, which often comprise many different materials and are assembled as part of a long process.
[In this instance] the designer creates the shoes using vacuum forming technology. A plastic sheet is heated until it is soft and draped over a mould inside the forming machine. … 
Waste pieces of the material can be recycled and used to create more shoes, which are available in any colour.

Fascinating! More here, including a video: Lou Moria uses vacuum forming to create recyclable shoes in seconds

Israeli designer Lou Moria has used a vacuum-forming process to create pairs of plastic slippers that can be produced quickly and cheaply.

[The shoes can] be created from a single piece of recyclable rubbery plastic. [This responded to] research on cheap shoes, which often comprise many different materials and are assembled as part of a long process.

[In this instance] the designer creates the shoes using vacuum forming technology. A plastic sheet is heated until it is soft and draped over a mould inside the forming machine. …

Waste pieces of the material can be recycled and used to create more shoes, which are available in any colour.

Fascinating! More here, including a video: Lou Moria uses vacuum forming to create recyclable shoes in seconds

Sep 07

From designer Dirk Vander Kooij:

It looks like a brilliant gold colored celestial body, but it’s a lamp made out of recycled synthetics and metal.
The form is derived from the Fresnel lens - a special lens that concentrates light into a relatively narrow beam which is used in for instance lighthouses, searchlights and navigation lights.

(via Fresnel Pending Lamp by Dirk Vander Kooij)

From designer Dirk Vander Kooij:

It looks like a brilliant gold colored celestial body, but it’s a lamp made out of recycled synthetics and metal.

The form is derived from the Fresnel lens - a special lens that concentrates light into a relatively narrow beam which is used in for instance lighthouses, searchlights and navigation lights.

(via Fresnel Pending Lamp by Dirk Vander Kooij)

Sep 05

[video]

The Art of “Kipple”
A project from photographer Dan Tobin Smith was evidently inspired by Philp K. Dick’s notion of “Kipple”

"Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday’s homeopape [newspaper]. When nobody’s around, kipple reproduces itself… the entire universe is moving towards a final state of total, absolute kippleization." From Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

According to Creative Review, Tobin Smith set out to “create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects.”So there was an open call for stuff people didn’t want anymore. And now: 

Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
The concept of kipple, says Tobin Smith, “inspired me to start thinking about design and products – we make so much stuff but we’ve got limited resources. Often it’s bound up with taste, we think because it’s beautiful it’s okay – but if it’s useless, it’s useless.”

More here: Creative Review - Dan Tobin Smith’s art of useless objects

The Art of “Kipple”

A project from photographer Dan Tobin Smith was evidently inspired by Philp K. Dick’s notion of “Kipple”

"Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday’s homeopape [newspaper]. When nobody’s around, kipple reproduces itself… the entire universe is moving towards a final state of total, absolute kippleization." From Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

According to Creative Review, Tobin Smith set out to “create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects.”So there was an open call for stuff people didn’t want anymore. And now:

Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.

The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.

The concept of kipple, says Tobin Smith, “inspired me to start thinking about design and products – we make so much stuff but we’ve got limited resources. Often it’s bound up with taste, we think because it’s beautiful it’s okay – but if it’s useless, it’s useless.”

More here: Creative Review - Dan Tobin Smith’s art of useless objects