Unconsumption

Jul 26

The Next Big Thing in Hardware: Smart Garbage - NYTimes.com -

This is a really thoughtful and engaging piece by Jenna Wortham:

By some measures, we are witnessing a rapid change in computing and the swift evolution of relationships between humans and automated helpers. A vision of the future is materializing before our very eyes, the development of networked helper bots that will manage every aspect of our lives, automating it and, theoretically, improving it by simplifying it.

But what happens when those devices go into disrepair — or worse, obsolescence — and their sleeker, faster successors go on sale, as part of the relentless cycle common among most major hardware companies?

Is smart garbage the next booming category of electronic waste?

Jul 25

Cool idea — and of course reminds me of The Uncollection! Love the idea of remixing what you own to replace logos, whether ours or something else!

Logo Removal Service takes discarded gimme shirts bedecked with sponsor logos, and carefully patches over them with new fabric, transforming them into amazing and abstract new one-of-a-kind garments.
They’ll also do custom work, covering over any stains, logos or graphics you want to disguise.
Take a Look // Logo Removal Service :: Never Any Repeats / Transform + Renew
 (via Upcycled t-shirts with patched-over logos - Boing Boing)

Cool idea — and of course reminds me of The Uncollection! Love the idea of remixing what you own to replace logos, whether ours or something else!

Logo Removal Service takes discarded gimme shirts bedecked with sponsor logos, and carefully patches over them with new fabric, transforming them into amazing and abstract new one-of-a-kind garments.

They’ll also do custom work, covering over any stains, logos or graphics you want to disguise.

Take a Look // Logo Removal Service :: Never Any Repeats / Transform + Renew

 (via Upcycled t-shirts with patched-over logos - Boing Boing)

Jul 24

significobs:


if you have a second copy of something or an old book you know you’ll never flip through again, this neat little Photo Album DIY from Photojojo is worth putting on your crafts to-do list.
The basic idea is to ‘upcycle’ the book into a photo album by cutting out windows in select pages, taping those pages to the next page on three sides using double-sided tape, and then sliding your prints of choice into the newly-created slots.

More: DIY: Upcycle an Old Book Into a Neat Photo Album in a Few Easy Steps

significobs:

if you have a second copy of something or an old book you know you’ll never flip through again, this neat little Photo Album DIY from Photojojo is worth putting on your crafts to-do list.

The basic idea is to ‘upcycle’ the book into a photo album by cutting out windows in select pages, taping those pages to the next page on three sides using double-sided tape, and then sliding your prints of choice into the newly-created slots.

More: DIY: Upcycle an Old Book Into a Neat Photo Album in a Few Easy Steps

Jul 23


Germany-based designer Sandman recently created this beautiful upcycled studio lamp out of a vinyl record and a camera tripod.
More upcycling projects on their blog.

More: A Clever Upcycled Lamp Made Out of an Old Vinyl Record and a Camera Tripod

Germany-based designer Sandman recently created this beautiful upcycled studio lamp out of a vinyl record and a camera tripod.

More upcycling projects on their blog.

More: A Clever Upcycled Lamp Made Out of an Old Vinyl Record and a Camera Tripod


A conceptual design for a London skyscraper by Paris studio Chartier-Corbasson Architectes proposes using waste generated by workers already in the building to help construct new floors as demand grows.

More: Chartier-Corbasson Architectes’ Organic Skyscraper made from rubbish

A conceptual design for a London skyscraper by Paris studio Chartier-Corbasson Architectes proposes using waste generated by workers already in the building to help construct new floors as demand grows.

More: Chartier-Corbasson Architectes’ Organic Skyscraper made from rubbish


Waste. What is the value of waste? In Cape Town everything is re-used and re-used and re-used until it falls apart. In Cape Town nothing is waste. Everywhere, from townships to more well–to-do areas, we can find products made of used or re-used materials. …. 
Department of Design is a three weeks event, initiated by the Dutch consulate, with Christine de Baan as program director. What makes this official Dutch participation in Cape Town Design Capital 2014 so special, is that it is not a ‘business as usual’ presentation of design objects. But this initiative rather seeks collaboration with South Africa on topics such as energy, water, health, education and town planning.

Read more here: What is waste worth? - Renny Ramakers

Waste. What is the value of waste? In Cape Town everything is re-used and re-used and re-used until it falls apart. In Cape Town nothing is waste. Everywhere, from townships to more well–to-do areas, we can find products made of used or re-used materials. ….

Department of Design is a three weeks event, initiated by the Dutch consulate, with Christine de Baan as program director. What makes this official Dutch participation in Cape Town Design Capital 2014 so special, is that it is not a ‘business as usual’ presentation of design objects. But this initiative rather seeks collaboration with South Africa on topics such as energy, water, health, education and town planning.

Read more here: What is waste worth? - Renny Ramakers

Jul 22


A supermarket chain in the UK announced today that it’s going to power one of its stores entirely off food waste. It’s an attractive solution to two of the most gnawing sustainability concerns: waste and energy.
A Sainsbury’s in Cannock, a town in the West Midlands, will get all of its electricity from food waste through a process called anaerobic digestion. The process is pretty much what it sounds like: waste food is “digested” by microorganisms in huge tankers sealed off from the air, which Sainsbury’s compares to a human stomach.
Biffa, the waste management company working with the supermarket, explains that the waste is broken down into a slurry that degrades into an energy rich biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide. 

More: This British Supermarket Will Be Powered Entirely by Its Own Food Waste | Motherboard

A supermarket chain in the UK announced today that it’s going to power one of its stores entirely off food waste. It’s an attractive solution to two of the most gnawing sustainability concerns: waste and energy.

A Sainsbury’s in Cannock, a town in the West Midlands, will get all of its electricity from food waste through a process called anaerobic digestion. The process is pretty much what it sounds like: waste food is “digested” by microorganisms in huge tankers sealed off from the air, which Sainsbury’s compares to a human stomach.

Biffa, the waste management company working with the supermarket, explains that the waste is broken down into a slurry that degrades into an energy rich biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide.

More: This British Supermarket Will Be Powered Entirely by Its Own Food Waste | Motherboard

Jul 21

[video]

Jul 20

Here’s one of the more interesting quasi-unconsumption branding tactics I’ve encountered: Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh has been talking up the benefits of not washing your jeans: 

In a post on LinkedIn called “The Dirty Jeans Manifesto,” Bergh explains both the environmental and durability benefits of never washing your jeans.
"We learned that an average pair of jeans consumes roughly 3,500 liters of water – and that is after only two years of use, washing the jeans once a week," Bergh writes. "Nearly half of the total water consumption, or 1,600 liters, is the consumer throwing the jeans in the washing machine. That’s equivalent to 6,700 glasses of drinking water!"
He adds that not washing them also helps them to last longer.

More here (including what to do about stains, and the benefits of freezing jeans as a cleaning alternative): Levi’s CEO Explains Why Not To Wash Your Jeans | HUH.

Here’s one of the more interesting quasi-unconsumption branding tactics I’ve encountered: Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh has been talking up the benefits of not washing your jeans:

In a post on LinkedIn called “The Dirty Jeans Manifesto,” Bergh explains both the environmental and durability benefits of never washing your jeans.

"We learned that an average pair of jeans consumes roughly 3,500 liters of water – and that is after only two years of use, washing the jeans once a week," Bergh writes. "Nearly half of the total water consumption, or 1,600 liters, is the consumer throwing the jeans in the washing machine. That’s equivalent to 6,700 glasses of drinking water!"

He adds that not washing them also helps them to last longer.

More here (including what to do about stains, and the benefits of freezing jeans as a cleaning alternative): Levi’s CEO Explains Why Not To Wash Your Jeans | HUH.

[video]

Jul 19

Earlier we mentioned the event World Design Capital 2014. Here’s a follow up: 

A spectacular structure, designed by Dutch design studio Droog and made entirely of salvaged materials, pops up in Cape Town this week for the Department of Design, a temporary hub connecting Dutch and South African designers as part of World Design Capital 2014

More: Lookbook: Department of Design | Design Indaba

Earlier we mentioned the event World Design Capital 2014. Here’s a follow up:

A spectacular structure, designed by Dutch design studio Droog and made entirely of salvaged materials, pops up in Cape Town this week for the Department of Design, a temporary hub connecting Dutch and South African designers as part of World Design Capital 2014

More: Lookbook: Department of Design | Design Indaba


Skyscrapers don’t build themselves, but the designers at French architecture firm Chartier-Corbosson might have come up with the next best thing: London Organic Skyscraper, if realized, would constantly grow using, as building material, the recycled waste of its residents.

(via Eco-Skyscraper Concept Grows From The Recycled Garbage Of Its Occupants | The Creators Project)

Skyscrapers don’t build themselves, but the designers at French architecture firm Chartier-Corbosson might have come up with the next best thing: London Organic Skyscraper, if realized, would constantly grow using, as building material, the recycled waste of its residents.

(via Eco-Skyscraper Concept Grows From The Recycled Garbage Of Its Occupants | The Creators Project)