Unconsumption

Oct 18


So, where do our electronic relics end up once we finally decide it’s time to recycle them? And what does our relationship with these outdated technologies say about us as a culture?
Julia Christensen, a multidisciplinary artist focused on systems of technology and consumerism, is creatively exploring the issue of electronic trash with a series of research-heavy investigations called Project Project (first ‘project’ reads like the noun, second ‘project’ reads like the verb that describes what a projector does).
In Burnouts, the most recent part of Project Project, the artist uses outdated iPhones and other trashed tech to create functional projectors through which she beams animations of obsolete constellations— celestial configurations that have been retired from star maps, often because light pollution has made them too difficult to see from Earth.

 More: We Talked To The Artist Turning E-Waste Into Projected Star Maps | The Creators Project

So, where do our electronic relics end up once we finally decide it’s time to recycle them? And what does our relationship with these outdated technologies say about us as a culture?

Julia Christensen, a multidisciplinary artist focused on systems of technology and consumerism, is creatively exploring the issue of electronic trash with a series of research-heavy investigations called Project Project (first ‘project’ reads like the noun, second ‘project’ reads like the verb that describes what a projector does).

In Burnouts, the most recent part of Project Project, the artist uses outdated iPhones and other trashed tech to create functional projectors through which she beams animations of obsolete constellations— celestial configurations that have been retired from star maps, often because light pollution has made them too difficult to see from Earth.

 More: We Talked To The Artist Turning E-Waste Into Projected Star Maps | The Creators Project


Plastic bottles lend themselves to an elegant policy trick that can greatly reduce the environmental impact of all that guzzling. You might even have it where you live: It’s called a bottle bill.
Bottle bills require beverage retailers to collect a five-cent (or more) deposit on every recyclable bottle sold. The deposit is returned to the consumer when they return the bottle. Ten states, including California, Michigan and Massachusetts, currently have bottle bills in place.
Adding that tiny deposit—that little system of reward for those who consume responsibly—can have an enormous environmental impact. States with bottle bills recycle beverage containers at almost three times the rate of states that do not. In Michigan, which has the highest deposit rate in the nation (10 cents), the bottle bill has been credited with reducing total waste 6 to 8 percent a year.

More: How to Cap Plastic Bottle Waste

Plastic bottles lend themselves to an elegant policy trick that can greatly reduce the environmental impact of all that guzzling. You might even have it where you live: It’s called a bottle bill.

Bottle bills require beverage retailers to collect a five-cent (or more) deposit on every recyclable bottle sold. The deposit is returned to the consumer when they return the bottle. Ten states, including California, Michigan and Massachusetts, currently have bottle bills in place.

Adding that tiny deposit—that little system of reward for those who consume responsibly—can have an enormous environmental impact. States with bottle bills recycle beverage containers at almost three times the rate of states that do not. In Michigan, which has the highest deposit rate in the nation (10 cents), the bottle bill has been credited with reducing total waste 6 to 8 percent a year.

More: How to Cap Plastic Bottle Waste

Oct 17


When Paul Wilson cycles across town, he tends to attract a lot of attention. It’s not due to his attire …  but rather the size of his cargo load. Wilson is one of the East Side Compost Pedallers, a bike-powered compost recycling program in Austin, Texas. 
The for-profit organization is on a mission to reduce landfill waste in Austin one bin at a time, by pedaling “scrapple” (their term for compostable food scraps) from homes and businesses to urban farms, schools, and community gardens, where it is composted into rich soil.

(via A Healthy Cycle for Austin’s Compost Scene)

When Paul Wilson cycles across town, he tends to attract a lot of attention. It’s not due to his attire …  but rather the size of his cargo load. Wilson is one of the East Side Compost Pedallers, a bike-powered compost recycling program in Austin, Texas.

The for-profit organization is on a mission to reduce landfill waste in Austin one bin at a time, by pedaling “scrapple” (their term for compostable food scraps) from homes and businesses to urban farms, schools, and community gardens, where it is composted into rich soil.

(via A Healthy Cycle for Austin’s Compost Scene)

Oct 14

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Oct 10


The idea of the lamp stems from the desire to reuse the tiles 40x40x1cm made of Carrara marble that are usually discarded. The waste of production is transformed into a resource through waterjet cutting.
morenoratti.com

(via Discarded marble reused: piùOmeno ( O-)_LED marble lamp | MOCO LOCO Submissions)

The idea of the lamp stems from the desire to reuse the tiles 40x40x1cm made of Carrara marble that are usually discarded. The waste of production is transformed into a resource through waterjet cutting.

morenoratti.com

(via Discarded marble reused: piùOmeno ( O-)_LED marble lamp | MOCO LOCO Submissions)


There’s only one gun store in Mexico, so Mexican drug dealers stocking up on AK-47s tend to look north of the border: Every year, more than 250,000 guns are smuggled in from the U.S.
As violence has increased over the last decade—in part thanks to the expiration of the U.S.’s assault weapons ban—artist Pedro Reyes decided to help bring new attention to the problem by making sculptures from melted guns.
“I wanted to make a kind of protest,” Reyes says. “A large number of weapons have entered Mexican territory, 90% from the United States. I wanted to turn that around and call attention to the need to stop the flow of weapons to Mexico.”

We have covered Reyes’ work in the past, but this is a good overview, and it’s notable that (for better or worse, given his source material!) he remains so productive:
 A Mexican Artist Turns Assault Weapons Into Musical Instruments And Art | Co.Exist | ideas impact

There’s only one gun store in Mexico, so Mexican drug dealers stocking up on AK-47s tend to look north of the border: Every year, more than 250,000 guns are smuggled in from the U.S.

As violence has increased over the last decade—in part thanks to the expiration of the U.S.’s assault weapons ban—artist Pedro Reyes decided to help bring new attention to the problem by making sculptures from melted guns.

“I wanted to make a kind of protest,” Reyes says. “A large number of weapons have entered Mexican territory, 90% from the United States. I wanted to turn that around and call attention to the need to stop the flow of weapons to Mexico.”

We have covered Reyes’ work in the past, but this is a good overview, and it’s notable that (for better or worse, given his source material!) he remains so productive:

 A Mexican Artist Turns Assault Weapons Into Musical Instruments And Art | Co.Exist | ideas impact

Oct 08


Adaptive reuse—in this case turning non-residential buildings into houses—lessens the physical proximity of the past to the future by sublimely juxtaposing sterile white voids with, say, a primal industrial exoskeleton. …
A Victorian water tower comes with six-foot-thick walls, while the façade of a medieval castle is relegated to mere ornament in the pursuit of both safety and functionality.
Inspired by Curbed’s avid Pinterest community, here’s a look back on a wide array of completely insane projects that (seemingly sane) architects have chosen to take on. Intrigued? Find some examples below, and visit the Pinterest board to see the ones that didn’t make the cut.

(via 17 Unexpected Things Converted Into Minimalist Homes - Conversions - Curbed National)

Adaptive reuse—in this case turning non-residential buildings into houses—lessens the physical proximity of the past to the future by sublimely juxtaposing sterile white voids with, say, a primal industrial exoskeleton. …

A Victorian water tower comes with six-foot-thick walls, while the façade of a medieval castle is relegated to mere ornament in the pursuit of both safety and functionality.

Inspired by Curbed’s avid Pinterest community, here’s a look back on a wide array of completely insane projects that (seemingly sane) architects have chosen to take on. Intrigued? Find some examples below, and visit the Pinterest board to see the ones that didn’t make the cut.

(via 17 Unexpected Things Converted Into Minimalist Homes - Conversions - Curbed National)

Oct 07


When it comes to camera bags, there’s no such thing as perfect.
But if you’re looking to get as close to perfect for you as possible, the best way to go about it is probably to create your own.
That’s exactly what Intructables user inspiredwood did with some help from his sewing skills, an old pair of jeans, and laptop bag he didn’t need any more. The result is a unique, functional, upcycled camera bag that looks great to boot!
The required materials will vary pending on what features you want your bag to have, but inspiredwood chose to use zippers, foam, nylon, bindings, ‘lots of’ velcro, a ruler, a sewing machine, scissors, a shoulder strap and some DIY skill to get the job done.

More: Make a Beautiful DIY Camera Bag from a Pair of Jeans and an Old Laptop Bag

When it comes to camera bags, there’s no such thing as perfect.

But if you’re looking to get as close to perfect for you as possible, the best way to go about it is probably to create your own.

That’s exactly what Intructables user inspiredwood did with some help from his sewing skills, an old pair of jeans, and laptop bag he didn’t need any more. The result is a unique, functional, upcycled camera bag that looks great to boot!

The required materials will vary pending on what features you want your bag to have, but inspiredwood chose to use zippers, foam, nylon, bindings, ‘lots of’ velcro, a ruler, a sewing machine, scissors, a shoulder strap and some DIY skill to get the job done.

More: Make a Beautiful DIY Camera Bag from a Pair of Jeans and an Old Laptop Bag