Unconsumption

Apr 15

[video]


In an effort to prepare for a world after peak oil, design student Mark Colliass has invented a bike accessory that can only be described as Peak Hipster. His clever contraption transforms a fixie into a rolling factory capable of cranking out arty, limited-edition lampshades that would make killer Etsy listings.
The project makes manufacturing as easy as, well, riding a bike. A bespoke rotational casting machine attaches to a bicycle’s handlebars. A small shot of liquid resin is poured into a rubber mold and it is inserted into the rig. As the rider pedals, the front wheel rotates the mold, sloshing the plastic around the cavity. A chemical transformation begins, and 40 minutes later the rider can remove a fully formed lampshade.

More: This Contraption Turns Your Bicycle Into a Lamp-Making Factory | Design | WIRED

In an effort to prepare for a world after peak oil, design student Mark Colliass has invented a bike accessory that can only be described as Peak Hipster. His clever contraption transforms a fixie into a rolling factory capable of cranking out arty, limited-edition lampshades that would make killer Etsy listings.

The project makes manufacturing as easy as, well, riding a bike. A bespoke rotational casting machine attaches to a bicycle’s handlebars. A small shot of liquid resin is poured into a rubber mold and it is inserted into the rig. As the rider pedals, the front wheel rotates the mold, sloshing the plastic around the cavity. A chemical transformation begins, and 40 minutes later the rider can remove a fully formed lampshade.

More: This Contraption Turns Your Bicycle Into a Lamp-Making Factory | Design | WIRED

Apr 14

[video]

My Yahoo Tech Colleague Dan Tynan has a great overview on getting rid of electronic devices that have outlived their utility: The 3 R’s of Retiring Your Old Gadgets: Reuse, Resell, or Recycle

According to the NPD Group, the average U.S. household owns nearly six Internet-connected devices. A recent survey by used gadget marketplace uSell reports that seven out of 10 Americans own gizmos they haven’t touched for at least two years. As a species, we generate 20 million to 50 million metric tons of e-waste each year, most of it toxic, the vast majority of which still goes into landfills.
So in my household and probably yours, it’s time for some serious spring cleaning. But if you want to do it in a responsible way, your options boil down to the three R’s: reuse, resell, or recycle.

And don’t miss his equally useful sidebar: Five Things You Must Do Before You Ditch Your Old Gadgets.

My Yahoo Tech Colleague Dan Tynan has a great overview on getting rid of electronic devices that have outlived their utility: The 3 R’s of Retiring Your Old Gadgets: Reuse, Resell, or Recycle

According to the NPD Group, the average U.S. household owns nearly six Internet-connected devices. A recent survey by used gadget marketplace uSell reports that seven out of 10 Americans own gizmos they haven’t touched for at least two years. As a species, we generate 20 million to 50 million metric tons of e-waste each year, most of it toxic, the vast majority of which still goes into landfills.

So in my household and probably yours, it’s time for some serious spring cleaning. But if you want to do it in a responsible way, your options boil down to the three R’s: reuse, resell, or recycle.

And don’t miss his equally useful sidebar: Five Things You Must Do Before You Ditch Your Old Gadgets.

Apr 13

[video]

Apr 11


Valencia-based designer Dan Gestoso’s bicycle design concept, Boske, is an IKEA-like bike with a wooden frame and mechanical pieces that are made out of aluminum cans.

More: Bike Concept Is Made Out Of Old Soda Cans [Pics] - PSFK

Valencia-based designer Dan Gestoso’s bicycle design concept, Boske, is an IKEA-like bike with a wooden frame and mechanical pieces that are made out of aluminum cans.

More: Bike Concept Is Made Out Of Old Soda Cans [Pics] - PSFK

Apr 05

Plastic bottle caps = art. 
These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here. 
See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.
(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

Plastic bottle caps = art.

These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here

See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.

(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

Apr 04

IF you happen to have an old fishing pole that’s no longer useful for catching fish, you could simply repurpose it as wall decor, a la this item via DabbledDetails on Etsy. 
Now if you’re really a fan of nautical things, fishing pole wall decor could be paired with an old boat turned into a couch or a boat suspended from the ceiling (for use as a bed or daybed?). Or maybe not. :)

IF you happen to have an old fishing pole that’s no longer useful for catching fish, you could simply repurpose it as wall decor, a la this item via DabbledDetails on Etsy

Now if you’re really a fan of nautical things, fishing pole wall decor could be paired with an old boat turned into a couch or a boat suspended from the ceiling (for use as a bed or daybed?). Or maybe not. :)

Apr 02

[video]

Mar 28

[video]


The US military is still inundated with obsolete and unusable ordnance from as far back as the beginning of the Cold War. But rather than simply dispose of these old bombs by, say, blowing them up, one enterprising design studio is transforming them into helpful house wares.
Created by Stockpile Designs of Brooklyn, NY, the Megaton floor lamp utilizes the hand-polished casing of a Korean War-era 100-lb kinetic bomb seated 42 inches above the ground on a narrow stand—its explosive guts replaced with coax-wiring for its dual-bulb socket. 

(via The Megaton Floor Lamp Is Built from a Real Bomb)

The US military is still inundated with obsolete and unusable ordnance from as far back as the beginning of the Cold War. But rather than simply dispose of these old bombs by, say, blowing them up, one enterprising design studio is transforming them into helpful house wares.

Created by Stockpile Designs of Brooklyn, NY, the Megaton floor lamp utilizes the hand-polished casing of a Korean War-era 100-lb kinetic bomb seated 42 inches above the ground on a narrow stand—its explosive guts replaced with coax-wiring for its dual-bulb socket.

(via The Megaton Floor Lamp Is Built from a Real Bomb)

Mar 27

[video]