12:20 pm - Wed, Apr 16, 2014
67 notes

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.
Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.
He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.

Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.

He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

3:40 pm - Tue, Apr 15, 2014
131 notes

junkculture:

Gasoline Canister Sculptures by Gerd Rohling

German artist Gerd Rohling creates sculptural pieces of art using found materials that he collects from the streets of Berlin. His exhibition titled “NOTHING FOR ALL” at gallery Piet Hein Eek features a series of brilliantly inventive sculptures made from discarded gasoline containers which he has simply cut into angular faces. Some of the faces seem to be sporting masks, while others have halos and hats made from rubber tires and waste baskets. Rohling’s work is a visually striking statement against pollution and serves as a reminder to recycle plastic waste.
12:20 pm
95 notes

In an effort to prepare for a world after peak oil, design student Mark Colliass has invented a bike accessory that can only be described as Peak Hipster. His clever contraption transforms a fixie into a rolling factory capable of cranking out arty, limited-edition lampshades that would make killer Etsy listings.
The project makes manufacturing as easy as, well, riding a bike. A bespoke rotational casting machine attaches to a bicycle’s handlebars. A small shot of liquid resin is poured into a rubber mold and it is inserted into the rig. As the rider pedals, the front wheel rotates the mold, sloshing the plastic around the cavity. A chemical transformation begins, and 40 minutes later the rider can remove a fully formed lampshade.

More: This Contraption Turns Your Bicycle Into a Lamp-Making Factory | Design | WIRED

In an effort to prepare for a world after peak oil, design student Mark Colliass has invented a bike accessory that can only be described as Peak Hipster. His clever contraption transforms a fixie into a rolling factory capable of cranking out arty, limited-edition lampshades that would make killer Etsy listings.

The project makes manufacturing as easy as, well, riding a bike. A bespoke rotational casting machine attaches to a bicycle’s handlebars. A small shot of liquid resin is poured into a rubber mold and it is inserted into the rig. As the rider pedals, the front wheel rotates the mold, sloshing the plastic around the cavity. A chemical transformation begins, and 40 minutes later the rider can remove a fully formed lampshade.

More: This Contraption Turns Your Bicycle Into a Lamp-Making Factory | Design | WIRED

3:40 pm - Mon, Apr 14, 2014
14 notes

Mixed feelings about recycler robots!

ZRR 2-Robot Fast Picker in action (by ZenRobotics)

Only the action! This short clip concentrates on the picking action of the ZenRobotics Recycler

Via: http://www.wired.com/2014/03/zenrobotics-recycler/

12:20 pm
97 notes
My Yahoo Tech Colleague Dan Tynan has a great overview on getting rid of electronic devices that have outlived their utility: The 3 R’s of Retiring Your Old Gadgets: Reuse, Resell, or Recycle

According to the NPD Group, the average U.S. household owns nearly six Internet-connected devices. A recent survey by used gadget marketplace uSell reports that seven out of 10 Americans own gizmos they haven’t touched for at least two years. As a species, we generate 20 million to 50 million metric tons of e-waste each year, most of it toxic, the vast majority of which still goes into landfills.
So in my household and probably yours, it’s time for some serious spring cleaning. But if you want to do it in a responsible way, your options boil down to the three R’s: reuse, resell, or recycle.

And don’t miss his equally useful sidebar: Five Things You Must Do Before You Ditch Your Old Gadgets.

My Yahoo Tech Colleague Dan Tynan has a great overview on getting rid of electronic devices that have outlived their utility: The 3 R’s of Retiring Your Old Gadgets: Reuse, Resell, or Recycle

According to the NPD Group, the average U.S. household owns nearly six Internet-connected devices. A recent survey by used gadget marketplace uSell reports that seven out of 10 Americans own gizmos they haven’t touched for at least two years. As a species, we generate 20 million to 50 million metric tons of e-waste each year, most of it toxic, the vast majority of which still goes into landfills.

So in my household and probably yours, it’s time for some serious spring cleaning. But if you want to do it in a responsible way, your options boil down to the three R’s: reuse, resell, or recycle.

And don’t miss his equally useful sidebar: Five Things You Must Do Before You Ditch Your Old Gadgets.

3:40 pm - Sun, Apr 13, 2014
191 notes

Turn parking spaces into mini-cities?

Fully equipped with a kitchen, bathroom, and a flexible living space, the SCADPad could be the way to creatively reuse the parking lot—one of a city’s most wasteful uses of space.”

More: Fast Company.

3:40 pm - Fri, Apr 11, 2014
121 notes

Valencia-based designer Dan Gestoso’s bicycle design concept, Boske, is an IKEA-like bike with a wooden frame and mechanical pieces that are made out of aluminum cans.

More: Bike Concept Is Made Out Of Old Soda Cans [Pics] - PSFK

Valencia-based designer Dan Gestoso’s bicycle design concept, Boske, is an IKEA-like bike with a wooden frame and mechanical pieces that are made out of aluminum cans.

More: Bike Concept Is Made Out Of Old Soda Cans [Pics] - PSFK

8:49 am - Sat, Apr 5, 2014
408 notes
Plastic bottle caps = art. 
These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here. 
See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.
(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

Plastic bottle caps = art.

These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here

See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.

(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

3:29 pm - Fri, Apr 4, 2014
194 notes
IF you happen to have an old fishing pole that’s no longer useful for catching fish, you could simply repurpose it as wall decor, a la this item via DabbledDetails on Etsy. 
Now if you’re really a fan of nautical things, fishing pole wall decor could be paired with an old boat turned into a couch or a boat suspended from the ceiling (for use as a bed or daybed?). Or maybe not. :)

IF you happen to have an old fishing pole that’s no longer useful for catching fish, you could simply repurpose it as wall decor, a la this item via DabbledDetails on Etsy

Now if you’re really a fan of nautical things, fishing pole wall decor could be paired with an old boat turned into a couch or a boat suspended from the ceiling (for use as a bed or daybed?). Or maybe not. :)

1:06 pm - Wed, Apr 2, 2014
1,835 notes

worldcafe:

Ever wonder what to do with old CDs?  A town in Bulgaria made them into public art.  More pictures and the story on Slate.

Upcycling used/unwanted/outdated CDs (6,000, in this case!) into works of art always is an interesting reuse. More examples of that, plus other new uses for CDs, in earlier Unconsumption posts here

(via npr)

12:33 pm - Fri, Mar 28, 2014
779 notes

npr:

Photos courtesy of Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent

"The Hippest Winery In Mexico Is Made Of Recycled Boats"

Architects Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent have carved a niche designing stunning, upscale wineries and other buildings in Baja.They specialize in finding uses for offbeat, reclaimed material. 

It’s wine o’clock — okay, it isn’t yet here in Texas, but it is somewhere — which means it’s time to share a wine-related repurposing find …

Today’s find:  A winery constructed from boats.

(See more in Unconsumption’s wine o’clock series here; previous boat-related posts: here.)

12:20 pm
122 notes

The US military is still inundated with obsolete and unusable ordnance from as far back as the beginning of the Cold War. But rather than simply dispose of these old bombs by, say, blowing them up, one enterprising design studio is transforming them into helpful house wares.
Created by Stockpile Designs of Brooklyn, NY, the Megaton floor lamp utilizes the hand-polished casing of a Korean War-era 100-lb kinetic bomb seated 42 inches above the ground on a narrow stand—its explosive guts replaced with coax-wiring for its dual-bulb socket. 

(via The Megaton Floor Lamp Is Built from a Real Bomb)

The US military is still inundated with obsolete and unusable ordnance from as far back as the beginning of the Cold War. But rather than simply dispose of these old bombs by, say, blowing them up, one enterprising design studio is transforming them into helpful house wares.

Created by Stockpile Designs of Brooklyn, NY, the Megaton floor lamp utilizes the hand-polished casing of a Korean War-era 100-lb kinetic bomb seated 42 inches above the ground on a narrow stand—its explosive guts replaced with coax-wiring for its dual-bulb socket.

(via The Megaton Floor Lamp Is Built from a Real Bomb)

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