3:40 pm - Wed, Apr 23, 2014
124 notes

Riding the bus in Detroit is not fun: Half of the city’s bus routes have been cancelled over the last decade, and waiting for a bus to show up can take as long as two hours. A new project is trying to make that wait a little more pleasant by building mobile bus shelters—and since this is Detroit, the shelters are made out of recycled parts from abandoned buildings.

More about the Door Stops project here: These Makeshift Detroit Bus Shelters Are Recycled From Abandoned Houses | Co.Exist | ideas impact

Riding the bus in Detroit is not fun: Half of the city’s bus routes have been cancelled over the last decade, and waiting for a bus to show up can take as long as two hours. A new project is trying to make that wait a little more pleasant by building mobile bus shelters—and since this is Detroit, the shelters are made out of recycled parts from abandoned buildings.

More about the Door Stops project here: These Makeshift Detroit Bus Shelters Are Recycled From Abandoned Houses | Co.Exist | ideas impact

12:20 pm
91 notes

Taiwanese design factory Fabcraft … wanted to find a way to bring 3D printing to the average person. They wound up getting some design plans and open-source software off the internet to build their own 3D printer, which they strapped to a bicycle and called Mobile Fab.



It has a workstation that grinds plastic cups (currently only No. 5 grade plastic) into a powder that is put into the 3D printer. The 3D printer converts the powder into an ink that is used to create gear-shaped tokens that are later fitted with LED lights and can be placed in bike spokes. The whole process takes about 2 hours.



The Fabcraft team bicycles around town asking people for their used cups and giving demonstrations on how the Mobile Fab works. They explain the many benefits of their creation, including reducing carbon footprints and pollution.

(h/t CNET)
More: Bike Turns Plastic Cups Into 3D Printer Ink - PSFK

Taiwanese design factory Fabcraft … wanted to find a way to bring 3D printing to the average person. They wound up getting some design plans and open-source software off the internet to build their own 3D printer, which they strapped to a bicycle and called Mobile Fab.

mobile-fab-demo.jpg

It has a workstation that grinds plastic cups (currently only No. 5 grade plastic) into a powder that is put into the 3D printer. The 3D printer converts the powder into an ink that is used to create gear-shaped tokens that are later fitted with LED lights and can be placed in bike spokes. The whole process takes about 2 hours.

mobile-fab-token.jpg

The Fabcraft team bicycles around town asking people for their used cups and giving demonstrations on how the Mobile Fab works. They explain the many benefits of their creation, including reducing carbon footprints and pollution.

(h/t CNET)

More: Bike Turns Plastic Cups Into 3D Printer Ink - PSFK

9:23 am
537 notes

An interesting, and somewhat confrontational, campaign to reduce consumption, featuring a shoe made of “shoreline rubbish.”

More at: EVERYTHING YOU BUY IS RUBBISH

3:40 pm - Tue, Apr 22, 2014
43 notes

Designer Alvaro Catalan de Ocon has created a range of wicker lamp shades woven with old plastic bottles by artisans in Chile for his PET Lamps project.

More: Plastic bottles woven with wicker form Chimbarongo light for PET Lamps

Designer Alvaro Catalan de Ocon has created a range of wicker lamp shades woven with old plastic bottles by artisans in Chile for his PET Lamps project.

More: Plastic bottles woven with wicker form Chimbarongo light for PET Lamps

12:20 pm
69 notes

Dutch designer Pepe Heykoop has made a series of furniture by casting recycled tin around wooden offcuts. 

(via Bits of Wood by Pepe Heykoop - Dezeen)

Dutch designer Pepe Heykoop has made a series of furniture by casting recycled tin around wooden offcuts.

(via Bits of Wood by Pepe Heykoop - Dezeen)

12:14 pm
34 notes

Eco-eclectic: Marine Debris Typeface by Dion Star, exploring product and waste, assembles an alphabet, each letter a carefully selected bit of marine debris, collected at Wherrytown Beach in Cornwall, England, presented exactly as found.

(via Marine Debris Typeface by Dion Star)

Eco-eclectic: Marine Debris Typeface by Dion Star, exploring product and waste, assembles an alphabet, each letter a carefully selected bit of marine debris, collected at Wherrytown Beach in Cornwall, England, presented exactly as found.

(via Marine Debris Typeface by Dion Star)

12:20 pm - Wed, Apr 16, 2014
73 notes

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.
Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.
He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.

Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.

He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

3:40 pm - Tue, Apr 15, 2014
135 notes

junkculture:

Gasoline Canister Sculptures by Gerd Rohling

German artist Gerd Rohling creates sculptural pieces of art using found materials that he collects from the streets of Berlin. His exhibition titled “NOTHING FOR ALL” at gallery Piet Hein Eek features a series of brilliantly inventive sculptures made from discarded gasoline containers which he has simply cut into angular faces. Some of the faces seem to be sporting masks, while others have halos and hats made from rubber tires and waste baskets. Rohling’s work is a visually striking statement against pollution and serves as a reminder to recycle plastic waste.
12:20 pm
96 notes

In an effort to prepare for a world after peak oil, design student Mark Colliass has invented a bike accessory that can only be described as Peak Hipster. His clever contraption transforms a fixie into a rolling factory capable of cranking out arty, limited-edition lampshades that would make killer Etsy listings.
The project makes manufacturing as easy as, well, riding a bike. A bespoke rotational casting machine attaches to a bicycle’s handlebars. A small shot of liquid resin is poured into a rubber mold and it is inserted into the rig. As the rider pedals, the front wheel rotates the mold, sloshing the plastic around the cavity. A chemical transformation begins, and 40 minutes later the rider can remove a fully formed lampshade.

More: This Contraption Turns Your Bicycle Into a Lamp-Making Factory | Design | WIRED

In an effort to prepare for a world after peak oil, design student Mark Colliass has invented a bike accessory that can only be described as Peak Hipster. His clever contraption transforms a fixie into a rolling factory capable of cranking out arty, limited-edition lampshades that would make killer Etsy listings.

The project makes manufacturing as easy as, well, riding a bike. A bespoke rotational casting machine attaches to a bicycle’s handlebars. A small shot of liquid resin is poured into a rubber mold and it is inserted into the rig. As the rider pedals, the front wheel rotates the mold, sloshing the plastic around the cavity. A chemical transformation begins, and 40 minutes later the rider can remove a fully formed lampshade.

More: This Contraption Turns Your Bicycle Into a Lamp-Making Factory | Design | WIRED

3:40 pm - Mon, Apr 14, 2014
15 notes

Mixed feelings about recycler robots!

ZRR 2-Robot Fast Picker in action (by ZenRobotics)

Only the action! This short clip concentrates on the picking action of the ZenRobotics Recycler

Via: http://www.wired.com/2014/03/zenrobotics-recycler/

12:20 pm
99 notes
My Yahoo Tech Colleague Dan Tynan has a great overview on getting rid of electronic devices that have outlived their utility: The 3 R’s of Retiring Your Old Gadgets: Reuse, Resell, or Recycle

According to the NPD Group, the average U.S. household owns nearly six Internet-connected devices. A recent survey by used gadget marketplace uSell reports that seven out of 10 Americans own gizmos they haven’t touched for at least two years. As a species, we generate 20 million to 50 million metric tons of e-waste each year, most of it toxic, the vast majority of which still goes into landfills.
So in my household and probably yours, it’s time for some serious spring cleaning. But if you want to do it in a responsible way, your options boil down to the three R’s: reuse, resell, or recycle.

And don’t miss his equally useful sidebar: Five Things You Must Do Before You Ditch Your Old Gadgets.

My Yahoo Tech Colleague Dan Tynan has a great overview on getting rid of electronic devices that have outlived their utility: The 3 R’s of Retiring Your Old Gadgets: Reuse, Resell, or Recycle

According to the NPD Group, the average U.S. household owns nearly six Internet-connected devices. A recent survey by used gadget marketplace uSell reports that seven out of 10 Americans own gizmos they haven’t touched for at least two years. As a species, we generate 20 million to 50 million metric tons of e-waste each year, most of it toxic, the vast majority of which still goes into landfills.

So in my household and probably yours, it’s time for some serious spring cleaning. But if you want to do it in a responsible way, your options boil down to the three R’s: reuse, resell, or recycle.

And don’t miss his equally useful sidebar: Five Things You Must Do Before You Ditch Your Old Gadgets.

3:40 pm - Sun, Apr 13, 2014
195 notes

Turn parking spaces into mini-cities?

Fully equipped with a kitchen, bathroom, and a flexible living space, the SCADPad could be the way to creatively reuse the parking lot—one of a city’s most wasteful uses of space.”

More: Fast Company.

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